• We present a detailed analysis of a recent $500$ ks net exposure \textit{Suzaku} observation, carried out in 2013, of the nearby ($z=0.184$) luminous (L$_{\rm bol}\sim10^{47}$ erg s$^{-1}$) quasar PDS 456 in which the X-ray flux was unusually low. The short term X-ray spectral variability has been interpreted in terms of variable absorption and/or intrinsic continuum changes. In the former scenario, the spectral variability is due to variable covering factors of two regions of partially covering absorbers. We find that these absorbers are characterised by an outflow velocity comparable to that of the highly ionised wind, i.e. $\sim0.25$ c, at the $99.9\%$ $(3.26\sigma)$ confidence level. This suggests that the partially absorbing clouds may be the denser clumpy part of the inhomogeneous wind. Following an obscuration event we obtained a direct estimate of the size of the X-ray emitting region, to be not larger than $20~R_{\rm g}$ in PDS 456.
  • Active galactic nuclei (AGN) show evidence for reprocessing gas, outflowing from the accreting black hole. The combined effects of absorption and scattering from the circumnuclear material likely explains the `hard excess' of X-ray emission above 20 keV, compared with extrapolation of spectra from lower X-ray energies. In a recent {\it Suzaku} study, we established the ubiquitous hard excess in hard X-ray-selected, radio-quiet type\,1 AGNs to be consistent with reprocessing of the X-ray continuum an ensemble of clouds, located tens to hundreds of gravitational radii from the nuclear black hole. Here we add hard X-ray-selected, type\,2 AGN to extend our original study and show that the gross X-ray spectral properties of the entire local population of radio quiet AGN may be described by a simple unified scheme. We find a broad, continuous distribution of spectral hardness ratio and Fe\,K$\alpha$ equivalent width across all AGN types, which can be reproduced by varying the observer's sightline through a single, simple model cloud ensemble, provided the radiative transfer through the model cloud distribution includes not only photoelectric absorption but also 3D Compton scattering. Variation in other parameters of the cloud distribution, such as column density or ionisation, should be expected between AGN, but such variation is not required to explain the gross X-ray spectral properties.
  • We present the analysis of a Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the local Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365. The source, well known for its dramatic X-ray spectral variability, was caught in a reflection-dominated, Compton-thick state. The high spatial resolution afforded by Chandra allowed us to isolate the soft X-ray emission from the active nucleus, neglecting most of the contribution from the kpc-scale starburst ring. The HETG spectra thus revealed a wealth of He- and H-like lines from photoionized gas, whereas in larger aperture observations these are almost exclusively produced through collisional ionization in the circumnuclear environment. Once the residual thermal component is accounted for, the emission-line properties of the photoionized region close to the hard X-ray continuum source indicate that NGC 1365 has some similarities to the local population of obscured active galaxies. In spite of the limited overall data quality, several soft X-ray lines seem to have fairly broad profiles (~800-1300 km/s full-width at half maximum), and a range of outflow velocities (up to ~1600 km/s, but possibly reaching a few thousands km/s) appears to be involved. At higher energies, the K$\alpha$ fluorescence line from neutral iron is resolved with > 99 per cent confidence, and its width of ~3000 km/s points to an origin from the same broad-line region clouds responsible for eclipsing the X-ray source and likely shielding the narrow-line region.
  • Ongoing studies with XMM-Newton have shown that powerful accretion disc winds, as revealed through highly-ionised Fe\,K-shell absorption at E>=6.7 keV, are present in a significant fraction of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the local Universe (Tombesi et al. 2010). In Gofford et al. (2013) we analysed a sample of 51 Suzaku-observed AGN and independently detected Fe K absorption in ~40% of the sample, and we measured the properties of the absorbing gas. In this work we build upon these results to consider the properties of the associated wind. On average, the fast winds (v_out>0.01c) are located <r>~10^{15-18} cm (typically ~10^{2-4} r_s) from their black hole, their mass outflow rates are of the order <M_out>~0.01-1 Msun/yr or ~(0.01-1) M_edd and kinetic power is constrained to <L_k> ~10^{43-45} erg/s, equivalent to ~(0.1-10%) L_edd. We find a fundamental correlation between the source bolometric luminosity and the wind velocity, with v_out \propto L_bol^{\alpha} and \alpha=0.4^{+0.3}_{-0.2}$ (90% confidence), which indicates that more luminous AGN tend to harbour faster Fe K winds. The mass outflow rate M_out, kinetic power L_k and momentum flux P_out of the winds are also consequently correlated with L_bol, such that more massive and more energetic winds are present in more luminous AGN. We investigate these properties in the framework of a continuum-driven wind, showing that the observed relationships are broadly consistent with a wind being accelerated by continuum-scattering. We find that, globally, a significant fraction (~85%) of the sample can plausibly exceed the L_k/L_bol~0.5% threshold thought necessary for feedback, while 45% may also exceed the less conservative ~5% of L_bol threshold as well. This suggests that the winds may be energetically significant for AGN--host-galaxy feedback processes.
  • The evolution of galaxies is connected to the growth of supermassive black holes in their centers. During the quasar phase, a huge luminosity is released as matter falls onto the black hole, and radiation-driven winds can transfer most of this energy back to the host galaxy. Over five different epochs, we detected the signatures of a nearly spherical stream of highly ionized gas in the broadband X-ray spectra of the luminous quasar PDS 456. This persistent wind is expelled at relativistic speeds from the inner accretion disk, and its wide aperture suggests an effective coupling with the ambient gas. The outflow's kinetic power larger than 10^46 ergs per second is enough to provide the feedback required by models of black hole and host galaxy co-evolution.
  • We present the time-resolved spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton data of NGC 1365, collected during one XMM-Newton observation, which caught this "changing-look" AGN in a high flux state characterized also by a low column density ($N_{\mathrm{H}}\sim 10^{22}$ cm $^{-2}$) of the X-ray absorber. During this observation the low energy photoelectric cut-off is at about $\sim 1$ keV and the primary continuum can be investigated with the XMM-Newton-RGS data, which show strong spectral variability that can be explained as a variable low $N_{\mathrm{H}}$, which decreased from $N_{\mathrm{H}} \sim10^{23}$ cm $^{-2}$ to $10^{22}$ cm $^{-2}$ in a 100 ks time-scale. The spectral analysis of the last segment of the observation revealed the presence of several absorption features that can be associated with an ionized (log $\xi \sim 2$ erg cm s$^{-1}$) outflowing wind ($v_{\mathrm{out}} \sim 2000$ km s$^{-1}$). We detected for the first time a possible P-Cygni profile of the Mg\,\textsc{xii} Ly$\alpha$ line associated with this mildly ionized absorber indicative of a wide angle outflowing wind. We suggest that this wind is a low ionization zone of the highly ionized wind present in NGC 1365, which is responsible for the iron K absorption lines and is located within the variable X-ray absorber. At the end of the observation, we detected a strong absorption line at $E\sim 0.76$ keV most likely associated with a lower ionization zone of the absorber (log $\xi \sim 0.2$ erg cm s$^{-1}$, $N_{\mathrm{H}} \sim 10^{22}$ cm $^{-2}$), which suggests that the variable absorber in NGC 1365 could be a low ionization zone of the disk wind.
  • We report on a comprehensive X-ray spectral analysis of the nearby radio-quiet quasar MR 2251-178, based on the long-look (~ 400 ks) XMM-Newton observation carried out in November 2011. As the properties of the multiphase warm absorber (thoroughly discussed in a recent, complementary work) hint at a steep photoionizing continuum, here we investigate into the nature of the intrinsic X-ray emission of MR 2251-178 by testing several physical models. The apparent 2-10 keV flatness as well as the subtle broadband curvature can be ascribed to partial covering of the X-ray source by a cold, clumpy absorption system with column densities ranging from a fraction to several x10^23 cm^-2. As opposed to more complex configurations, only one cloud is required along the line of sight in the presence of a soft X-ray excess, possibly arising as Comptonized disc emission in the accretion disc atmosphere. On statistical grounds, even reflection with standard efficiency off the surface of the inner disc cannot be ruled out, although this tentatively overpredicts the observed ~ 14-150 keV emission. It is thus possible that each of the examined physical processes is relevant to a certain degree, and hence only a combination of high-quality, simultaneous broadband spectral coverage and multi-epoch monitoring of X-ray spectral variability could help disentangling the different contributions. Yet, regardless of the model adopted, we infer for MR 2251-178 a bolometric luminosity of ~ 5-7 x 10^45 erg/s, implying that the central black hole is accreting at ~ 15-25 per cent of the Eddington limit.
  • We present evidence for the rapid variability of the high velocity iron K-shell absorption in the nearby ($z=0.184$) quasar PDS456. From a recent long Suzaku observation in 2013 ($\sim1$Ms effective duration) we find that the the equivalent width of iron K absorption increases by a factor of $\sim5$ during the observation, increasing from $<105$eV within the first 100ks of the observation, towards a maximum depth of $\sim500$eV near the end. The implied outflow velocity of $\sim0.25$c is consistent with that claimed from earlier (2007, 2011) Suzaku observations. The absorption varies on time-scales as short as $\sim1$ week. We show that this variability can be equally well attributed to either (i) an increase in column density, plausibly associated with a clumpy time-variable outflow, or (ii) the decreasing ionization of a smooth homogeneous outflow which is in photo-ionization equilibrium with the local photon field. The variability allows a direct measure of absorber location, which is constrained to within $r=200-3500$$\rm{r_{g}}$ of the black hole. Even in the most conservative case the kinetic power of the outflow is $\gtrsim6\%$ of the Eddington luminosity, with a mass outflow rate in excess of $\sim40\%$ of the Eddington accretion rate. The wind momentum rate is directly equivalent to the Eddington momentum rate which suggests that the flow may have been accelerated by continuum-scattering during an episode of Eddington-limited accretion.
  • We present a comparison of two Suzaku X-ray observations of the nearby (z=0.184), luminous ($L_{bol} \sim 10^{47}$ erg s$^{-1}$) type I quasar, PDS456. A new 125ks Suzaku observation in 2011 caught the quasar during a period of low X-ray flux and with a hard X-ray spectrum, in contrast to a previous 190ks Suzaku observation in 2007 when the quasar appeared brighter and had a steep ($\Gamma>2$) X-ray spectrum. The 2011 X-ray spectrum contains a pronounced trough near 9\,keV in the quasar rest frame, which can be modeled with blue-shifted iron K-shell absorption, most likely from the He and H-like transitions of iron. The absorption trough is observed at a similar rest-frame energy as in the earlier 2007 observation, which appears to confirm the existence of a persistent high velocity wind in PDS 456, at an outflow velocity of $0.25-0.30$c. The spectral variability between 2007 and 2011 can be accounted for by variations in a partial covering absorber, increasing in covering fraction from the brighter 2007 observation to the hard and faint 2011 observation. Overall the low flux 2011 observation can be explained if PDS 456 is observed at relatively low inclination angles through a Compton thick wind, originating from the accretion disk, which significantly attenuates the X-ray flux from the quasar.
  • High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the warm absorber in the nearby quasar, MR2251-178 (z = 0.06398) is presented. The observations were carried out in 2011 using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating and the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer, with net exposure times of approximately 400 ks each. A multitude of absorption lines from C to Fe are detected, revealing at least 3 warm absorbing components ranging in ionization parameter from log(\xi/erg cm s^-1) = 1-3 and with outflow velocities < 500 km/s. The lowest ionization absorber appears to vary between the Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, which implies a radial distance of between 9-17 pc from the black hole. Several broad soft X-ray emission lines are strongly detected, most notably from He-like Oxygen, with FWHM velocity widths of up to 10000 km/s, consistent with an origin from Broad Line Region (BLR) clouds. In addition to the warm absorber, gas partially covering the line of sight to the quasar appears to be present, of typical column density N_H = 10^23 cm^-2. We suggest that the partial covering absorber may arise from the same BLR clouds responsible for the broad soft X-ray emission lines. Finally the presence of a highly ionised outflow in the iron K band from both 2002 and 2011 Chandra HETG observations appears to be confirmed, which has an outflow velocity of -15600 \pm 2400 km/s. However a partial covering origin for the iron K absorption cannot be excluded, resulting from low ionization material with little or no outflow velocity.
  • We present the analysis of a new broad-band X-ray spectrum (0.6-180.0 keV) of the radio-quiet quasar MR 2251-178 which uses data obtained with both Suzaku and the Swift/BAT. In accordance with previous observations, we find that the general continuum can be well described by a power-law with {\Gamma}=1.6 and an apparent soft-excess below 1 keV. Warm absorption is clearly present and absorption lines due to the Fe UTA, Fe L (Fe XXIII-XXIV), S XV and S XVI are detected below 3 keV. At higher energies, Fe K absorption from Fe XXV-XXVI is detected and a relatively weak (EW=25[+12,-8] eV) narrow Fe K{\alpha} emission line is observed at E=6.44\pm0.04 keV. The Fe K{\alpha} emission is well modelled by the presence of a mildly ionised ({\xi}\leq30) reflection component with a low reflection fraction (R<0.2). At least 5 ionised absorption components with 10^{20} \leq N_H \leq 10^{23} cm^{-2} and 0 \leq log({\xi})/erg cm s^{-1} \leq 4 are required to achieve an adequate spectral fit. Alternatively, we show that the continuum can also be fit if a {\Gamma}~2.0 power-law is absorbed by a column of N_H~10^{23} cm^{-2} which covers ~30% of the source flux. Independent of which continuum model is adopted, the Fe L and Fe XXV He{\alpha} lines are described by a single absorber outflowing with v_out~0.14 c. Such an outflow/disk wind is likely to be substantially clumped (b~10^{-3}) in order to not vastly exceed the likely accretion rate of the source.
  • Here we present the results of a Suzaku observation of the Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445. We confirm the results obtained with the previous X-ray observations which unveiled the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines and an overall X-ray emission which strongly resembles a typical Seyfert 2 despite of the optical classification as an unobscured AGN. The broad band spectrum allowed us to measure for the first time the amount of reflection (R~0.9) which together with the relatively strong neutral Fe Kalpha emission line (EW ~ 100 eV) strongly supports a scenario where a Compton-thick mirror is present. The primary X-ray continuum is strongly obscured by an absorber with a column density of NH =2-3 x10^{23} cm^{-2}. Two possible scenarios are proposed for the absorber: a neutral partial covering or a mildly ionised absorber with an ionisation parameter log\xi ~ 1.0 erg cm s^{-1}. A comparison with the past and more recent X-ray observations of 3C 445 performed with XMM-Newton and Chandra is presented, which provided tentative evidence that the ionised and outflowing absorber varied. We argue that the absorber is probably associated with an equatorial disk-wind located within the parsec scale molecular torus.