• We present a detailed analysis of the radial distribution of light-element multiple populations (LE-MPs) in the massive and dense globular cluster M80 based on the combination of UV and optical Hubble Space Telescope data. Surprisingly, we find that first generation stars (FG) are significantly more centrally concentrated than extreme second generation ones (SG) out to $\sim 2.5 r_h$ from the cluster center. To understand the origin of such a peculiar behavior, we used a set of $N$-body simulations following the long-term dynamical evolution of LE-MPs. We find that, given the advanced dynamical state of the cluster, the observed difference does not depend on the primordial relative distributions of FG and SG stars. On the contrary, a difference of $\sim 0.05-0.10 M_{\odot}$ between the average masses of the two sub-populations is needed to account for the observed radial distributions. We argue that such a mass difference might be the result of the higher He abundance of SG stars (of the order of $\Delta Y\sim 0.05-0.06$) with respect to FG. Interestingly, we find that a similar He variation is necessary to reproduce the horizontal branch morphology of M80. These results demonstrate that differences in mass among LE-MPs, due to different He content, should be properly taken into account for a correct interpretation of their radial distribution, at least in dynamically evolved systems.
  • Current sheet is believed to be the region of energy dissipation via magnetic reconnection in solar flares. However, its properties, for example, the dynamic process, have not been fully understood. Here we report a current sheet in a solar flare (SOL2017-09-10T16:06) that was clearly observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory as well as the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode. The high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations show that the current sheet is mainly visible in high temperature (>10 MK) passbands, particularly in the Fe XXIV 192.03 line with a formation temperature of ~18 MK. The hot Fe XXIV 192.03 line exhibits very large nonthermal velocities up to 200 km/s in the current sheet, suggesting that turbulent motions exist there. The largest turbulent velocity occurs at the edge of the current sheet, with some offset with the strongest line intensity. At the central part of the current sheet, the turbulent velocity is negatively correlated with the line intensity. From the line emission and turbulent features we obtain a thickness in the range of 7--11 Mm for the current sheet. These results suggest that the current sheet has internal fine and dynamic structures that may help the magnetic reconnection within it proceeds efficiently.
  • Using hundreds of XMM-Newton and Chandra archival observations and nearly a thousand RXTE observations, we have generated a comprehensive library of the known pulsars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC, LMC). The pulsars are detected multiple times across the full parameter spaces of X-ray luminosity ($L_X= 10^{31-38}$~erg/s) and spin period ( P$<$1s -- P$>$1000s) and the library enables time-domain studies at a range of energy scales. The high time-resolution and sensitivity of the EPIC cameras are complemented by the angular resolution of Chandra and the regular monitoring of RXTE. Our processing %$\sim$15 year pipeline uses the latest calibration files and software to generate a suite of useful products for each pulsar detection: event lists, high time-resolution light curves, periodograms, spectra, and complete histories of $\dot{P}$, the pulsed fraction, etc., in the broad (0.2-12 keV), soft (0.2-2 keV), and hard (2-12 keV) energy bands. After combining the observations from these telescopes, we found that 28 pulsars show long-term spin up and 25 long-term spin down. We also used the faintest and brightest sources to map out the lower and upper boundaries of accretion-powered X-ray emission: the propeller line and the Eddington line, respectively. We are in the process of comparing the observed pulse profiles to geometric models of X-ray emission in order to constrain the physical parameters of the pulsars. Finally we are preparing a public release of the library so that it can be used by others in the astronomical community.
  • Pion energy spectra are presented for central collisions of neutron-rich 132Sn+124Sn and neutron-deficient 108Sn+112Sn systems using simulations with Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport model. These calculations, which incorporate isospin-dependent mean field potentials for relevant baryons and mesons, display a sensitivity to the pion spectra that could allow significant constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy and its mean field potential at supra-saturation densities. The predicted sensitivity increases with the isospin asymmetry of the total system and decreases with incident energy.
  • The $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model successfully reproduces many aspects of the galaxy and structure formation of the universe. However, the growth of large-scale structures (LSSs) in the early universe is not well tested yet with observational data. Here, we have utilized wide and deep optical--near-infrared data in order to search for distant galaxy clusters and superclusters ($0.8<z<1.2$). From the spectroscopic observation with the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) on the Magellan telescope, three massive clusters at $z\sim$0.91 are confirmed in the SSA22 field. Interestingly, all of them have similar redshifts within $\Delta z\sim$0.01 with velocity dispersions ranging from 470 to 1300 km s$^{-1}$. Moreover, as the maximum separation is $\sim$15 Mpc, they compose a supercluster at $z\sim$0.91, meaning that this is one of the most massive superclusters at this redshift to date. The galaxy density map implies that the confirmed clusters are embedded in a larger structure stretching over $\sim$100 Mpc. $\Lambda$CDM models predict about one supercluster like this in our surveyed volume, consistent with our finding so far. However, there are more supercluster candidates in this field, suggesting that additional studies are required to determine if the $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model can successfully reproduce the LSSs at high redshift.
  • We have explored, computationally and experimentally, the magnetic properties of \fecob{} alloys. Calculations provide a good agreement with experiment in terms of the saturation magnetization and the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy with some difficulty in describing Co$_2$B, for which it is found that both full potential effects and electron correlations treated within dynamical mean field theory are of importance for a correct description. The material exhibits a uniaxial magnetic anisotropy for a range of cobalt concentrations between $x=0.1$ and $x=0.5$. A simple model for the temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy suggests that the complicated non-monotonous temperature behaviour is mainly due to variations in the band structure as the exchange splitting is reduced by temperature. Using density functional theory based calculations we have explored the effect of substitutional doping the transition metal sublattice by the whole range of 5$d$ transition metals and found that doping by Re or W elements should significantly enhance the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy. Experimentally, W doping did not succeed in enhancing the magnetic anisotropy due to formation of other phases. On the other hand, doping by Ir and Re was successful and resulted in magnetic anisotropies that are in agreement with theoretical predictions. In particular, doping by 2.5~at.\% of Re on the Fe/Co site shows a magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy which is increased by 50\% compared to its parent (Fe$_{0.7}$Co$_{0.3}$)$_2$B compound, making this system interesting, for example, in the context of permanent magnet replacement materials or in other areas where a large magnetic anisotropy is of importance.
  • Numerous observational studies have revealed the ubiquitous presence of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters and cast many hard challenges for the study of the formation and dynamical history of these stellar systems. In this Letter we present the results of a study of the kinematic properties of multiple populations in NGC 2808 based on high-precision Hubble Space Telescope proper-motion measurements. In a recent study, Milone et al. have identified five distinct populations (A, B, C, D, and E) in NGC 2808. Populations D and E coincide with the helium-enhanced populations in the middle and the blue main sequences (mMS and bMS) previously discovered by Piotto et al.; populations A, B, and C correspond to the redder main sequence (rMS) that in the Piotto et al. was associated with the primordial stellar population. Our analysis shows that, in the outermost regions probed (between about 1.5 and 2 times the cluster half-light radius), the velocity distribution of populations D and E is radially anisotropic (the deviation from an isotropic distribution is significant at the ~3.5-sigma level). Stars of populations D and E have a smaller tangential velocity dispersion than those of populations A, B, and C, while no significant differences are found in the radial-velocity dispersion. We present the results of a numerical simulation showing that the observed differences between the kinematics of these stellar populations are consistent with the expected kinematic fingerprint of the diffusion towards the cluster outer regions of stellar populations initially more centrally concentrated.
  • In 1961, R. Landauer proposed the principle that logical irreversibility is associated with physical irreversibility and further theorized that the erasure of information is fundamentally a dissipative process. Landauer posited that a fundamental energy cost is incurred by the erasure of information contained in the memory of a computation device. His theory states that to erase one binary bit of information from a physical memory element in contact with a heat bath at a given temperature, at least kT ln(2) of heat must be dissipated from the memory into the environment, where k is the Boltzmann constant and T is the temperature. Although this connection between information theory and thermodynamics has proven to be very useful for establishing boundary limits for physical processes, Landauer principle has been a subject of some debate. Despite the theoretical controversy and fundamental importance of Landauer erasure in information technology, this phenomenon has not been experimentally explored using any practical physical implementation for digital information. Here, we report an investigation of the thermodynamic limits of the memory erasure process using nanoscale magnetic memory bits, by far the most ubiquitous digital storage technology today. Through sensitive, temperature dependent magnetometry measurements, we observed that the amount of dissipated energy is consistent with the Landauer limit during an adiabatic erasure process in nanoscale, single domain magnetic thin film islands. This result confirms the connection between information thermodynamics and physical systems and also provides a foundation for the development of practical information processing technologies that approach the fundamental limit of energy dissipation.
  • We prove that the integral closedness of any ideal of height at least two is compatible with specialization by a generic element. This opens the possibility for proofs using induction on the height of an ideal. Also, with additional assumptions, we show that an element is integral over a module if it is integral modulo a generic element of the module. This turns questions about integral closures of modules into problems about integral closures of ideals, by means of a construction known as Bourbaki ideal.
  • We present the Chasing the Identification of ASCA Galactic Objects (ChIcAGO) survey, which is designed to identify the unknown X-ray sources discovered during the ASCA Galactic Plane Survey (AGPS). Little is known about most of the AGPS sources, especially those that emit primarily in hard X-rays (2-10 keV) within the F_x ~ 10^-13 to 10^-11 erg cm^-2 s^-1 X-ray flux range. In ChIcAGO, the subarcsecond localization capabilities of Chandra have been combined with a detailed multi-wavelength follow-up program, with the ultimate goal of classifying the >100 unidentified sources in the AGPS. Overall to date, 93 unidentified AGPS sources have been observed with Chandra as part of the ChIcAGO survey. A total of 253 X-ray point sources have been detected in these Chandra observations within 3' of the original ASCA positions. We have identified infrared and optical counterparts to the majority of these sources, using both new observations and catalogs from existing Galactic plane surveys. X-ray and infrared population statistics for the X-ray point sources detected in the Chandra observations reveal that the primary populations of Galactic plane X-ray sources that emit in the F_x ~ 10^-13 to 10^-11 erg cm^-2 s^-1 flux range are active stellar coronae, massive stars with strong stellar winds that are possibly in colliding-wind binaries, X-ray binaries, and magnetars. There is also a fifth population that is still unidentified but, based on its X-ray and infrared properties, likely comprise partly of Galactic sources and partly of active galactic nuclei.
  • For a Noetherian local ring $(\RR, \m)$, the first two Hilbert coefficients, $e_0$ and $e_1$, of the $I$-adic filtration of an $\m$-primary ideal $I$ are known to code for properties of $\RR$, of the blowup of $\spec(\RR)$ along $V(I)$, and even of their normalizations. We give estimations for these coefficients when $I$ is enlarged (in the case of $e_1$ in the same integral closure class) for general Noetherian local rings.
  • Using deep Chandra observations of the globular cluster M28, we study the quiescent X-ray emission of a neutron star in a low-mass X-ray binary in order to constrain the chemical composition of the neutron star atmosphere and the equation of state of dense matter. We fit the spectrum with different neutron star atmosphere models composed of hydrogen, helium or carbon. The parameter values obtained with the carbon model are unphysical and such a model can be ruled out. Hydrogen and helium models give realistic parameter values for a neutron star, and the derived mass and radius are clearly distinct depending on the composition of the atmosphere. The hydrogen model gives masses/radii consistent with the canonical values of 1.4 Msun and 10 km, and would allow for the presence of exotic matter inside neutron stars. On the other hand, the helium model provides solutions with higher masses/radii, consistent with the stiffest equations of state. Measurements of neutron star masses/radii by spectral fitting should consider the possibility of heavier element atmospheres, which produce larger masses/radii for the same data, unless the composition of the accretor is known independently.
  • We present a multi-object optical spectroscopy follow-up study of X-ray sources in a field along the Galactic Plane (l=327.42 deg, b=2.26 deg) which is part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane survey (ChaMPlane). We obtained spectra for 46 stars, including 15 likely counterparts to X-ray sources, and sources showing an H-alpha color excess. This has led to the identification of a new cataclysmic variable (CV), CXOPS J154305.5-522709, also named ChaMPlane Bright Source 7 (CBS~7), and we identified 8 X-ray sources in the field as active late-type stars. CBS~7 was previously studied in X-rays and showed a hard spectrum and two periods: 1.22+/-0.08 h and 2.43+/-0.26 h. We present here clear evidence that the source is a CV through the detection of H, HeI and HeII emission lines in its optical spectrum. The hard X-ray spectrum and the presence of the HeII 4686 in emission with a large equivalent width suggest a magnetic CV. The near-infrared counterpart is significantly variable, and we found a period consistent with the longest X-ray period at 2.39+/-0.05 h but not the shortest X-ray period. If this period is the orbital period, this would place the system in the CV period gap. The possible orbital period suggests a dM4+/-1 companion star. The distance is then estimated to be ~1 kpc. The system could be a relatively hard and X-ray luminous polar or an intermediate polar, possibly nearly-synchronous.
  • We successfully carried out the first high-altitude balloon flight of a wide-field hard X-ray coded-aperture telescope ProtoEXIST1, which was launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico on October 9, 2009. ProtoEXIST1 is the first implementation of an advanced CdZnTe (CZT) imaging detector in our ongoing program to establish the technology required for next generation wide-field hard X-ray telescopes. The CZT detector plane in ProtoEXIST1 consists of an 8 x 8 array of closely tiled 2 cm x 2 cm x 0.5 cm thick pixellated CZT crystals, each with 8 x 8 pixels, covering a 256 cm^2 active area with 2.5 mm pixels. A tungsten mask, mounted at 90 cm above the detector provides shadowgrams of X-ray sources in the 30 - 600 keV band for imaging, allowing a fully coded field of view of 9 Deg x 9 Deg with an angular resolution of 20 arcmin. To reduce the background radiation, the detector is surrounded by semi-graded (Pb/Sn/Cu) passive shields on the four sides all the way to the mask. On the back side, a 26 cm x 26 cm x 2 cm CsI(Na) active shield provides signals to tag charged particle induced events as well as >~ 100 keV background photons from below. The flight duration was only about 7.5 hours due to strong winds (60 knots) at float altitude (38-39 km). Throughout the flight, the CZT detector performed excellently. The telescope observed Cyg X-1 for ~ 1 hour at the end of the flight. Despite a few problems with the pointing and aspect systems that caused the telescope to track about 6.4 deg off the target, the analysis of the Cyg X-1 data revealed an X-ray source at 7.2 sigma in the 30-100 keV energy band at the expected location from the optical images taken by the onboard daytime star camera. The success of this first flight is very encouraging for the future development of the advanced CZT imaging detectors (ProtoEXIST2, with 0.6 mm pixels).
  • A problem posed by Wolmer V. Vasconcelos on the variation of the first Hilbert coefficients of parameter ideals with a common integral closure in a local ring is studied. Affirmative answers are given and counterexamples are explored as well.
  • The hard X-ray sky now being studied by INTEGRAL and Swift and soon by NuSTAR is rich with energetic phenomena and highly variable non-thermal phenomena on a broad range of timescales. The High Energy Telescope (HET) on the proposed Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) mission will repeatedly survey the full sky for rare and luminous hard X-ray phenomena at unprecedented sensitivities. It will detect and localize (<20", at 5 sigma threshold) X-ray sources quickly for immediate followup identification by two other onboard telescopes - the Soft X-ray imager (SXI) and Optical/Infrared Telescope (IRT). The large array (4.5 m^2) of imaging (0.6 mm pixel) CZT detectors in the HET, a coded-aperture telescope, will provide unprecedented high sensitivity (~0.06 mCrab Full Sky in a 2 year continuous scanning survey) in the 5 - 600 keV band. The large field of view (90 deg x 70 deg) and zenith scanning with alternating-orbital nodding motion planned for the first 2 years of the mission will enable nearly continuous monitoring of the full sky. A 3y followup pointed mission phase provides deep UV-Optical-IR-Soft X-ray and Hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopy for thousands of sources discovered in the Survey. We review the HET design concept and report the recent progress of the CZT detector development, which is underway through a series of balloon-borne wide-field hard X-ray telescope experiments, ProtoEXIST. We carried out a successful flight of the first generation of fine pixel large area CZT detectors (ProtoEXIST1) on Oct 9, 2009. We also summarize our future plan (ProtoEXIST2 & 3) for the technology development needed for the HET.
  • The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is designed to i) use the birth of stellar mass black holes, as revealed by cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), as probes of the very first stars and galaxies to exist in the Universe. Both their extreme luminosity (~104 times larger than the most luminous quasars) and their hard X-ray detectability over the full sky with wide-field imaging make them ideal "back-lights" to measure cosmic structure with X-ray, optical and near-IR (nIR) spectra over many sight lines to high redshift. The full-sky imaging detection and rapid followup narrow-field imaging and spectroscopy allow two additional primary science objectives: ii) novel surveys of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) accreting as very luminous but rare quasars, which can trace the birth and growth of the first SMBHs as well as quiescent SMBHs (non-accreting) which reveal their presence by X-ray flares from the tidal disruption of passing field stars; and iii) a multiwavelength Time Domain Astrophysics (TDA) survey to measure the temporal variability and physics of a wide range of objects, from birth to death of stars and from the thermal to non-thermal Universe. These science objectives are achieved with the telescopes and mission as proposed for EXIST described here.
  • This gives an alternate proof of the Theorem by the authors that shows the first Hilbert coefficient of parameter ideals in an unmixed Noetherian local ring is always negative unless the ring is Cohen--Macaulay.
  • The epochs of origin of the first stars and galaxies, and subsequent growth of the first supermassive black holes, are among the most fundamental questions. Observations of the highest redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) will be the most compelling in situ probe of the history of initial star formation and consequent epoch of reionization if their prompt and precise detection can be followed immediately by sensitive near-IR imaging and spectroscopy. Blazars are the persistent analogs of GRBs and for the same reason (beaming) can be observed at highest redshifts where they might best trace the high accretion rate-driven jets and growth of supermassive black holes in galaxies. The proposed EXIST mission can uniquely probe these questions, and many others, given its unparalled combination of sensitivity and spatial-spectral-temporal coverage and resolution. Here we provide a brief summary of the mission design, key science objectives, mission plan and readiness for EXIST, as proposed to Astro2010.
  • The primary instrument of the proposed EXIST mission is a coded mask high energy telescope (the HET), that must have a wide field of view and extremely good sensitivity. It will be crucial to minimize systematic errors so that even for very long total integration times the imaging performance is close to the statistical photon limit. There is also a requirement to be able to reconstruct images on-board in near real time in order to detect and localize gamma-ray bursts. This must be done while the spacecraft is scanning the sky. The scanning provides all-sky coverage and is key to reducing systematic errors. The on-board computational problem is made even more challenging for EXIST by the very large number of detector pixels. Numerous alternative designs for the HET have been evaluated. The baseline concept adopted depends on a unique coded mask with two spatial scales. Monte Carlo simulations and analytic analysis techniques have been used to demonstrate the capabilities of the design and of the proposed two-step burst localization procedure.
  • The conjecture of Wolmer Vasconcelos on the vanishing of the first Hilbert coefficient $e_1(Q)$ is solved affirmatively, where $Q$ is a parameter ideal in a Noetherian local ring. Basic properties of the rings for which $e_1(Q)$ vanishes are derived. The invariance of $e_1(Q)$ for parameter ideals $Q$ and its relationship to Buchsbaum rings are studied.
  • The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a proposed next generation multi-wavelength survey mission. The primary instrument is a High Energy telescope (HET) that conducts the deepest survey for Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs), obscured-accreting and dormant Supermassive Black Holes and Transients of all varieties for immediate followup studies by the two secondary instruments: a Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) and an Optical/Infrared Telescope (IRT). EXIST will explore the early Universe using high redshift GRBs as cosmic probes and survey black holes on all scales. The HET is a coded aperture telescope employing a large array of imaging CZT detectors (4.5 m^2, 0.6 mm pixel) and a hybrid Tungsten mask. We review the current HET concept which follows an intensive design revision by the HET imaging working group and the recent engineering studies in the Instrument and Mission Design Lab at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The HET will locate GRBs and transients quickly (<10-30 sec) and accurately (< 20") for rapid (< 1-3 min) onboard followup soft X-ray and optical/IR (0.3-2.2 micron) imaging and spectroscopy. The broad energy band (5-600 keV) and the wide field of view (~90 deg x 70 deg at 10% coding fraction) are optimal for capturing GRBs, obscured AGNs and rare transients. The continuous scan of the entire sky every 3 hours will establish a finely-sampled long-term history of many X-ray sources, opening up new possibilities for variability studies.
  • We have constructed a moderately large area (32 cm2), fine pixel (2.5 mm pixel, 5 mm thick) CZT imaging detector which constitutes the first section of a detector module (256 cm2) developed for a balloon-borne wide-field hard X-ray telescope, ProtoEXIST1. ProtoEXIST1 is a prototype for the High Energy Telescope (HET) in the Energetic X-ray imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST), a next generation space-borne multi-wavelength telescope. We have constructed a large (nearly gapless) detector plane through a modularization scheme by tiling of a large number of 2 cm x 2 cm CZT crystals. Our innovative packaging method is ideal for many applications such as coded-aperture imaging, where a large, continuous detector plane is desirable for the optimal performance. Currently we have been able to achieve an energy resolution of 3.2 keV (FWHM) at 59.6 keV on average, which is exceptional considering the moderate pixel size and the number of detectors in simultaneous operation. We expect to complete two modules (512 cm2) within the next few months as more CZT becomes available. We plan to test the performance of these detectors in a near space environment in a series of high altitude balloon flights, the first of which is scheduled for Fall 2009. These detector modules are the first in a series of progressively more sophisticated detector units and packaging schemes planned for ProtoEXIST2 & 3, which will demonstrate the technology required for the advanced CZT imaging detectors (0.6 mm pixel, 4.5 m2 area) required in EXIST/HET.
  • We use semi-analytic techniques to evaluate the burst sensitivity of designs for the EXIST hard X-ray survey mission. Applying these techniques to the mission design proposed for the Beyond Einstein program, we find that with its very large field-of-view and faint gamma-ray burst detection threshold, EXIST will detect and localize approximately two bursts per day, a large fraction of which may be at high redshift. We estimate that EXIST's maximum sensitivity will be ~4 times greater than that of Swift's Burst Alert Telescope. Bursts will be localized to better than 40 arcsec at threshold, with a burst position as good as a few arcsec for strong bursts. EXIST's combination of three different detector systems will provide spectra from 3 keV to more than 10 MeV. Thus, EXIST will enable a major leap in the understanding of bursts, their evolution, environment, and utility as cosmological probes.
  • We report our progress on the development of pixellated imaging CZT detector arrays for our first-generation balloon-borne wide-field hard X-ray (20 - 600 keV) telescope, ProtoEXIST1. Our ProtoEXIST program is a pathfinder for the High Energy Telescope (HET) on the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey telescope (EXIST), a proposed implementation of the Black Hole Finder Probe. ProtoEXIST1 consists of four independent coded-aperture telescopes with close-tiled (~0.4 mm gaps) CZT detectors that preserve their 2.5mm pixel pitch. Multiple shielding/field-of-view configurations are planned to identify optimal geometry for the HET in EXIST. The primary technical challenge in ProtoEXIST is the development of large area, close-tiled modules of imaging CZT detectors (1000 cm2 for ProtoEXIST1), with all readout and control systems for the ASIC readout vertically stacked. We describe the overall telescope configuration of ProtoEXIST1 and review the current development status of the CZT detectors, from individual detector crystal units (DCUs) to a full detector module (DM). We have built the first units of each component for the detector plane and have completed a few Rev2 DCUs (2x2 cm2), which are under a series of tests. Bare DCUs (pre-crystal bonding) show high, uniform ASIC yield (~70%) and ~30% reduction in electronics noise compared to the Rev1 equivalent. A Rev1 DCU already achieved ~1.2% FWHM at 662 keV, and preliminary analysis of the initial radiation tests on a Rev2 DCU shows ~ 4 keV FWHM at 60 keV (vs. 4.7 keV for Rev1). We therefore expect about <~1% FWHM at 662 keV with the Rev2 detectors.