• Photonic states with large and fixed photon numbers, such as Fock states, enable quantum-enhanced metrology but remain an experimentally elusive resource. A potentially simple, deterministic and scalable way to generate these states consists of fully exciting $N$ quantum emitters equally coupled to a common photonic reservoir, which leads to a collective decay known as Dicke superradiance. The emitted $N$-photon state turns out to be a highly entangled multimode state, and to characterise its metrological properties in this work we: (i) develop theoretical tools to compute the Quantum Fisher Information of general multimode photonic states; (ii) use it to show that Dicke superradiant photons in 1D waveguides achieve Heisenberg scaling, which can be saturated by a parity measurement; (iii) and study the robustness of these states to experimental limitations in state-of-art atom-waveguide QED setups.
  • We present a general framework for the generation of random unitaries based on random quenches in atomic Hubbard and spin models, forming approximate unitary $n$-designs, and their application to the measurement of R\'enyi entropies. We generalize our protocol presented in [Elben2017: arXiv:1709.05060, to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett.] to a broad class of atomic and spin lattice models. We further present an in-depth numerical and analytical study of experimental imperfections, including the effect of decoherence and statistical errors, and discuss connections of our approach with many-body quantum chaos.
  • Single and two-mode multiphoton states are the cornerstone of many quantum technologies, e.g., metrology. In the optical regime these states are generally obtained combining heralded single-photons with linear optics tools and post-selection, leading to inherent low success probabilities. In a recent paper, we design several protocols that harness the long-range atomic interactions induced in waveguide QED to improve fidelities and protocols of single-mode multiphoton emission. Here, we give full details of these protocols, revisit them to simplify some of their requirements and also extend them to generate two-mode multiphoton states, such as Yurke or NOON states.
  • In this work we study the quantum dynamics emerging when quantum emitters exchange excitations with a two-dimensional bosonic bath with hexagonal symmetry. We show that a single quantum emitter spectrally tuned to the middle of the band relaxes following a logarithmic law in time due to the existence of a singular point with vanishing density of states, i.e., the Dirac point. Moreover, when several emitters are coupled to the bath at that frequency, long-range coherent interactions between them appear which decay inversely proportional to their distance without exponential attenuation. We analyze both the finite and infinite system situation using both perturbative and non-perturbative methods.
  • We show that the coupling of quantum emitters to a two-dimensional reservoir with a simple band structure gives rise to exotic quantum dynamics with no analogue in other scenarios and which can not be captured by standard perturbative treatments. In particular, for a single quantum emitter with its transition frequency in the middle of the band we predict an exponential relaxation at a rate different from that predicted by the Fermi's Golden rule, followed by overdamped oscillations and slow relaxation decay dynamics. This is accompanied by directional emission into the reservoir. This directionality leads to a modification of the emission rate for few emitters and even perfect subradiance, i.e., suppression of spontaneous emission, for four quantum emitters.
  • The interaction of quantum emitters with structured baths modifies both their individual and collective dynamics. In Gonz\'alez-Tudela \emph{et al} we show how exotic quantum dynamics emerge when QEs are spectrally tuned around the middle of the band of a two-dimensional structured reservoir, where we predict the failure of perturbative treatments, anisotropic interactions and novel super and subradiant behaviour. In this work, we provide further analysis of that situation, together with a complete analysis for the quantum emitter dynamics in spectral regions different from the center of the band.
  • We characterize the information dynamics of strongly disordered systems using a combination of analytics, exact diagonalization, and matrix product operator simulations. More specifically, we study the spreading of quantum information in three different scenarios: thermalizing, Anderson localized, and many-body localized. We qualitatively distinguish these cases by quantifying the amount of remnant information in a local region. The nature of the dynamics is further explored by computing the propagation of mutual information with respect to varying partitions. Finally, we demonstrate that classical simulability, as captured by the magnitude of MPO truncation errors, exhibits enhanced fluctuations near the localization transition, suggesting the possibility of its use as a diagnostic of the critical point.
  • We theoretically show that an externally driven dipole placed inside a cylindrical hollow waveguide can generate a train of ultrashort and ultrafocused electromagnetic pulses. The waveguide encloses vacuum with perfect electric conducting walls. A dipole driven by a single short pulse, which is properly engineered to exploit the linear spectral filtering of the cylindrical hollow waveguide, excites longitudinal waveguide modes that are coherently re-focused at some particular instances of time. A dipole driven by a pulse with a lower-bounded temporal width can thus generate, in principle, a finite train of arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic pulses. We numerically show that such ultrafocused pulses persist outside the cylindrical waveguide at distances comparable to its radius.
  • We show a fundamental limitation in the description of quantum many-body mixed states with tensor networks in purification form. Namely, we show that there exist mixed states which can be represented as a translationally invariant (TI) matrix product density operator (MPDO) valid for all system sizes, but for which there does not exist a TI purification valid for all system sizes. The proof is based on an undecidable problem and on the uniqueness of canonical forms of matrix product states. The result also holds for classical states.
  • We present a platform for the simulation of quantum magnetism with full control of interactions between pairs of spins at arbitrary distances in one- and two-dimensional lattices. In our scheme, two internal atomic states represent a pseudo-spin for atoms trapped within a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW). With the atomic transition frequency aligned inside a band gap of the PCW, virtual photons mediate coherent spin-spin interactions between lattice sites. To obtain full control of interaction coefficients at arbitrary atom-atom separations, ground-state energy shifts are introduced as a function of distance across the PCW. In conjunction with auxiliary pump fields, spin-exchange versus atom-atom separation can be engineered with arbitrary magnitude and phase, and arranged to introduce non-trivial Berry phases in the spin lattice, thus opening new avenues for realizing novel topological spin models. We illustrate the broad applicability of our scheme by explicit construction for several well known spin models.
  • We propose a scheme to realize a topological insulator with optical-passive elements, and analyze the effects of Kerr-nonlinearities in its topological behavior. In the linear regime, our design gives rise to an optical spectrum with topological features and where the bandwidths and bandgaps are dramatically broadened. The resulting edge modes cover a very wide frequency range. We relate this behavior to the fact that the effective Hamiltonian describing the system's amplitudes is long-range. We also develop a method to analyze the scheme in the presence of a Kerr medium. We assess robustness and stability of the topological features, and predict the presence of chiral squeezed fluctuations at the edges in some parameter regimes.
  • In spite of decades of effort, it has not yet been possible to create single-mode multiphoton states of light with high success probability and near unity fidelity. Complex quantum states of propagating optical photons would be an enabling resource for diverse protocols in quantum information science, including for interconnecting quantum nodes in quantum networks. Here, we propose several methods to generate heralded mutipartite entangled atomic and photonic states by using the strong and long-range dissipative couplings between atoms emerging in waveguide QED setups. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates high success probabilities and fidelities are possible exploiting waveguide QED properties.
  • The formation of bound states involving multiple particles underlies many interesting quantum physical phenomena, such as Efimov physics or superconductivity. In this work we show the existence of an infinite number of such states for some boson impurity models. They describe free bosons coupled to an impurity and include some of the most representative models in quantum optics. We also propose a family of wavefunctions to describe the bound states and verify that it accurately characterizes all parameter regimes by comparing its predictions with exact numerical calculations for a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian. For that model, we also analyze the nature of the bound states by studying the scaling relations of physical quantities such as the ground state energy and localization length, and find a non-analytical behavior as a function of the coupling strength. Finally, we discuss how to test our theoretical predictions in experimental platforms such as photonic crystal structures and cold atoms in optical lattices.
  • The Schwinger model, or 1+1 dimensional QED, offers an interesting object of study, both at zero and non-zero temperature, because of its similarities to QCD. In this proceeding, we present the a full calculation of the temperature dependent chiral condensate of this model in the continuum limit using Matrix Product States (MPS). MPS methods, in general tensor networks, constitute a very promising technique for the non-perturbative study of Hamiltonian quantum systems. In the last few years, they have shown their suitability as ansatzes for ground states and low-lying excita- tions of lattice gauge theories. We show the feasibility of the approach also for finite temperature, both in the massless and in the massive case.
  • We demonstrate the suitability of tensor network techniques for describing the thermal evolution of lattice gauge theories. As a benchmark case, we have studied the temperature dependence of the chiral condensate in the Schwinger model, using matrix product operators to approximate the thermal equilibrium states for finite system sizes with non-zero lattice spacings. We show how these techniques allow for reliable extrapolations in bond dimension, step width, system size and lattice spacing, and for a systematic estimation and control of all error sources involved in the calculation. The reached values of the lattice spacing are small enough to capture the most challenging region of high temperatures and the final results are consistent with the analytical prediction by Sachs and Wipf over a broad temperature range.
  • A scheme to utilize atom-like emitters coupled to nanophotonic waveguides is proposed for the generation of many-body entangled states and for the reversible mapping of these states of matter to photonic states of an optical pulse in the waveguide. Our protocol makes use of decoherence-free subspaces (DFS) for the atomic emitters with coherent evolution within the DFS enforced by strong dissipative coupling to the waveguide. By switching from subradiant to superradiant states, entangled atomic states are mapped to photonic states with high fidelity. An implementation using ultracold atoms coupled to a photonic crystal waveguide is discussed.
  • It is typically assumed that disorder is essential to realize Anderson localization. Recently, a number of proposals have suggested that an interacting, translation invariant system can also exhibit localization. We examine these claims in the context of a one-dimensional spin ladder. At intermediate time scales, we find slow growth of entanglement entropy consistent with the phenomenology of many-body localization. However, at longer times, all finite wavelength spin polarizations decay in a finite time, independent of system size. We identify a single length scale which parametrically controls both the eventual spin transport times and the divergence of the susceptibility to spin glass ordering. We dub this long pre-thermal dynamical behavior, intermediate between full localization and diffusion, quasi-many body localization.
  • We propose the use of photonic crystal structures to design subwavelength optical lattices in two dimensions for ultracold atoms by using both Guided Modes and Casimir-Polder forces. We further show how to use Guided Modes for photon-induced large and strongly long-range interactions between trapped atoms. Finally, we analyze the prospects of this scheme to implement spin models for quantum simulation
  • We propose to use sub-wavelength confinement of light associated with the near field of plasmonic systems to create nanoscale optical lattices for ultracold atoms. Our approach combines the unique coherence properties of isolated atoms with the sub-wavelength manipulation and strong light-matter interaction associated with nano-plasmonic systems. It allows one to considerably increase the energy scales in the realization of Hubbard models and to engineer effective long-range interactions in coherent and dissipative many-body dynamics. Realistic imperfections and potential applications are discussed.
  • We show the feasibility of tensor network solutions for lattice gauge theories in Hamiltonian formulation by applying matrix product states algorithms to the Schwinger model with zero and non-vanishing fermion mass. We introduce new techniques to compute excitations in a system with open boundary conditions, and to identify the states corresponding to low momentum and different quantum numbers in the continuum. For the ground state and both the vector and scalar mass gaps in the massive case, the MPS technique attains precisions comparable to the best results available from other techniques.
  • We propose and analyze a nanoengineered vortex array in a thin-film type-II superconductor as a magnetic lattice for ultracold atoms. This proposal addresses several of the key questions in the development of atomic quantum simulators. By trapping atoms close to the surface, tools of nanofabrication and structuring of lattices on the scale of few tens of nanometers become available with a corresponding benefit in energy scales and temperature requirements. This can be combined with the possibility of magnetic single site addressing and manipulation together with a favorable scaling of superconducting surface-induced decoherence.
  • We propose and analyze a scheme to observe topological phenomena with ions in microtraps. We consider a set of trapped ions forming a regular structure in two spatial dimensions and interacting with lasers. We find phonon bands with non-trivial topological properties, which are caused by the breaking of time reversal symmetry induced by the lasers. We investigate the appearance of edge modes, as well as their robustness against perturbations. Long-range hopping of phonons caused by the Coulomb interaction gives rise to flat bands which, together with induced phonon-phonon interactions, can be used to produce and explore strongly correlated states. Furthermore, some of these ideas can also be implemented with cold atoms in optical lattices.
  • We show that by magnetically trapping a superconducting microsphere close to a quantum circuit, it is experimentally feasible to perform ground-state cooling and to prepare quantum superpositions of the center-of-mass motion of the microsphere. Due to the absence of clamping losses and time dependent electromagnetic fields, the mechanical motion of micrometer-sized metallic spheres in the Meissner state is predicted to be very well isolated from the environment. Hence, we propose to combine the technology of magnetic microtraps and superconducting qubits to bring relatively large objects to the quantum regime.
  • A new approach for realization of a quantum interface between single photons and single ions in an ion crystal is proposed and analyzed. In our approach the coupling between a single photon and a single ion is enhanced via the collective degrees of freedom of the ion crystal. Applications including single-photon generation, a memory for a quantum repeater, and a deterministic photon-photon, photon-phonon, or photon-ion entangler are discussed.
  • We propose a method to prepare and verify spatial quantum superpositions of a nanometer-sized object separated by distances of the order of its size. This method provides unprecedented bounds for objective collapse models of the wave function by merging techniques and insights from cavity quantum optomechanics and matter wave interferometry. An analysis and simulation of the experiment is performed taking into account standard sources of decoherence. We provide an operational parameter regime using present day and planned technology.