• We report the discovery of a metamagnetic phase transition in a polar antiferromagnet Ni$_3$TeO$_6$ that occurs at 52 T. The new phase transition accompanies a colossal magnetoelectric effect, with a magnetic-field-induced polarization change of 0.3 $\mu$C/cm$^2$, a value that is 4 times larger than for the spin-flop transition at 9 T in the same material, and also comparable to the largest magnetically-induced polarization changes observed to date. Via density-functional calculations we construct a full microscopic model that describes the data. We model the spin structures in all fields and clarify the physics behind the 52 T transition. The high-field transition involves a competition between multiple different exchange interactions which drives the polarization change through the exchange-striction mechanism. The resultant spin structure is rather counter-intuitive and complex, thus providing new insights on design principles for materials with strong magnetoelectric coupling.
  • We report a de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) oscillation study on IrTe2 single crystals showing complex dimer formations. By comparing the angle dependence of dHvA oscillations with band structure calculations, we show distinct Fermi surface reconstruction induced by a 1/5-type and a 1/8-type dimerizations. This verifies that an intriguing quasi-two-dimensional conducting plane across the layers is induced by dimerization in both cases. A phase transition to the 1/8 phase with higher dimer density reveals that local instabilities associated with intra- and interdimer couplings are the main driving force for complex dimer formations in IrTe2.
  • Structural and magnetic chiralities are found to coexist in a small group of materials in which they produce intriguing phenomenologies such as the recently discovered skyrmion phases. Here, we describe a previously unknown manifestation of this interplay in MnSb2O6, a trigonal oxide with a chiral crystal structure. Unlike all other known cases, the MnSb2O6 magnetic structure is based on co-rotating cycloids rather than helices. The coupling to the structural chirality is provided by a magnetic axial vector, related to the so-called vector chirality. We show that this unique arrangement is the magnetic ground state of the symmetric-exchange Hamiltonian, based on ab-initio theoretical calculations of the Heisenberg exchange interactions, and is stabilised by out-of-plane anisotropy. MnSb2O6 is predicted to be multiferroic with a unique ferroelectric switching mechanism.
  • Selenium (Se) substitution drastically increases the transition temperature of iridium ditelluride (IrTe$_{2}$) to a diamagnetic superstructure from 278 K to 560 K. Transmission electron microscopy experiments revealed that this enhancement is accompanied by the evolution of non-sinusoidal structure modulations from $q = 1/5(10\bar{1})$- to $q = 1/6(10\bar{1})$-types. These comprehensive results are consistent with the concept of the destabilization of polymeric Te-Te bonds at the transition, the temperature of which is increased by chemical and hydrostatic pressure and by the substitution of Te with the more electronegative Se. This temperature-induced depolymerization transition in IrTe$_{2}$ is unique in crystalline inorganic solids.
  • In the DAE{\delta}ALUS (Decay-At-rest Experiment for {\delta}CP studies At the Laboratory for Underground Science) project, high power H+2 cyclotron chains are proposed to efficiently provide proton beams with a kinetic energy of 800 MeV and an average power in the MW range. Space charge plays a pivotal role in both the injector and the ring cyclotrons. Large-scale particle simulations show that the injector cyclotron is a space charge dominated cyclotron and that a 5mA beam current can be extracted with tolerable beam losses on the septum. In contrast, in the ring cyclotron, no space charge induced beam loss is observed during acceleration and extraction.
  • DAE$\delta$ALUS (Decay-At-rest Experiment for $\delta_{CP}$ studies At the Laboratory for Underground Science) provides a new approach to the search for CP violation in the neutrino sector. High-power continuous-wave proton cyclotrons efficiently provide the necessary proton beams with an energy of up to 800 MeV to create neutrinos from pion and muon decay-at-rest. The experiment searches for $\bar{\nu}_{\mu} \rightarrow \bar{\nu}_e$ at short baselines corresponding to the atmospheric $\Delta m^2$ region. The $\bar{\nu}_e$ will be detected via inverse beta decay. Thus, the cyclotrons will be employed at a future ultra-large gadolinium-doped water or scintillator detector. In this paper we address the most challenging questions regarding a cyclotron-based high-power proton driver in the megawatt range with a kinetic energy of 800 MeV. Aspects of important subsystems like the ion source and injection chain, the magnet design and radio frequency system will be addressed. Precise beam dynamics simulations, including space charge and the $\text{H}_2^+$ stripping process, are the base for the characterization and quantification of the beam halo -- one of the most limiting processes in high-power particle accelerators.