• In this work we present spectra of all $\gamma$-ray burst (GRB) afterglows that have been promptly observed with the X-shooter spectrograph until 31-03-2017. In total, we obtained spectroscopic observations of 103 individual GRBs observed within 48 hours of the GRB trigger. Redshifts have been measured for 97 per cent of these, covering a redshift range from 0.059 to 7.84. Based on a set of observational selection criteria that minimize biases with regards to intrinsic properties of the GRBs, the follow-up effort has been focused on producing a homogeneous sample of 93 afterglow spectra for GRBs discovered by the Swift satellite. We here provide a public release of all the reduced spectra, including continuum estimates and telluric absorption corrections. For completeness, we also provide reductions for the 18 late-time observations of the underlying host galaxies. We provide an assessment of the degree of completeness with respect to the parent GRB population, in terms of the X-ray properties of the bursts in the sample and find that the sample presented here is representative of the full Swift sample. We constrain the fraction of dark bursts to be < 28 per cent and we confirm previous results that higher optical darkness is correlated with increased X-ray absorption. For the 42 bursts for which it is possible, we provide a measurement of the neutral hydrogen column density, increasing the total number of published HI column density measurements by $\sim$ 33 per cent. This dataset provides a unique resource to study the ISM across cosmic time, from the local progenitor surroundings to the intervening universe.
  • We report the detection of the CO(3-2) emission line from the host galaxy of Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) 080207 at $z$ = 2.086. This is the first detection of molecular gas in emission from a GRB host galaxy beyond redshift 1. We find this galaxy to be rich in molecular gas with a mass of $1.1 \times 10^{11}\,\rm M_{\odot}$ assuming $\alpha_{\rm CO}=$ 4.36 $\rm M_{\odot}(\rm K\,km\,s^{-1}\,pc^2)^{-1}$. The molecular gas mass fraction of the galaxy is $\sim$ 0.5, typical of star forming galaxies (SFGs) with similar stellar masses and redshifts. With a $\rm SFR_{FIR}$ of 260 $\rm M_{\odot}\,yr^{-1}$, we measure a molecular-gas-depletion timescale of 0.43 Gyr, near the peak of the depletion timescale distribution of SFGs at similar redshifts. Our findings are therefore in contradiction with the proposed molecular gas deficiency in GRB host galaxies. We argue that the reported molecular gas deficiency for GRB hosts could be the artifact of improper comparisons or neglecting the effect of the typical low metallicities of GRB hosts on the CO-to-molecular-gas conversion factor. We also compare the kinematics of the CO(3-2) emission line to that of the H$\alpha$ emission line from the host galaxy. We find the H$\alpha$ emission to have contributions from two separate components, a narrow and a broad one. The narrow component matches the CO emission well in velocity space. The broad component, with a FWHM of $\sim$ 1100 $\rm km\,s^{-1}$, is separated by $+390$ $\rm km\,s^{-1}$ in velocity space from the narrow component. We speculate this broad component to be associated with a powerful outflow in the host galaxy or in an interacting system.
  • We present a comprehensive temporal and spectral analysis of the long Swift GRB 120327A afterglow data to investigate the possible causes of the observed early time colour variations. We collected data from various instruments/telescopes in different bands (X-rays, ultra- violet, optical and near-infrared) and determined the shapes of the afterglow early-time light curves. We studied the overall temporal behaviour and the spectral energy distributions from early to late times. The ultra-violet, optical, and near-infrared light curves can be modelled with a single power-law component between 200 and 2e4 s after the burst event. The X-ray light curve shows a canonical steep-shallow-steep behaviour, typical of long gamma-ray bursts. At early times a colour variation is observed in the ultra-violet/optical bands, while at very late times a hint of a re-brightening is visible. The observed early time colour change can be explained as a variation in the intrinsic optical spectral index, rather than an evolution of the optical extinction.
  • Previous studies have shown that the incidence rate of intervening strong MgII absorbers towards GRBs were a factor of 2 - 4 higher than towards quasars. Exploring the similar sized and uniformly selected legacy data sets XQ-100 and XSGRB, each consisting of 100 quasar and 81 GRB afterglow spectra obtained with a single instrument (VLT/X-shooter), we demonstrate that there is no disagreement in the number density of strong MgII absorbers with rest-frame equivalent widths $W_r^{2796} >$ 1 {\AA} towards GRBs and quasars in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 5. With large and similar sample sizes, and path length coverages of $\Delta$z = 57.8 and 254.4 for GRBs and quasars, respectively, the incidences of intervening absorbers are consistent within 1 sigma uncertainty levels at all redshifts. For absorbers at z < 2.3 the incidence towards GRBs is a factor of 1.5$\pm$0.4 higher than the expected number of strong MgII absorbers in SDSS quasar spectra, while for quasar absorbers observed with X-shooter we find an excess factor of 1.4$\pm$0.2 relative to SDSS quasars. Conversely, the incidence rates agree at all redshifts with reported high spectral resolution quasar data, and no excess is found. The only remaining discrepancy in incidences is between SDSS MgII catalogues and high spectral resolution studies. The rest-frame equivalent width distribution also agrees to within 1 sigma uncertainty levels between the GRB and quasar samples. Intervening strong MgII absorbers towards GRBs are therefore neither unusually frequent, nor unusually strong.
  • It is notoriously difficult to localize short $\gamma$-ray bursts (sGRBs) and their hosts to measure their redshifts. These measurements, however, are critical to constrain the nature of sGRB progenitors, their redshift distribution and the $r$-process element enrichment history of the universe. Here, we present spectroscopy of the host galaxy of GRB111117A and measure its redshift to be $z = 2.211$. This makes GRB111117A the most distant high-confidence short duration GRB detected to date. Our spectroscopic redshift supersedes a lower, previously estimated photometric redshift value for this burst. We use the spectroscopic redshift, as well as new imaging data to constrain the nature of the host galaxy and the physical parameters of the GRB. The rest-frame X-ray derived hydrogen column density, for example, is the highest compared to a complete sample of sGRBs and seems to follow the evolution with redshift as traced by the hosts of long GRBs (lGRBs). The host lies in the brighter end of the expected sGRB host brightness distribution at $z = 2.211$, and is actively forming stars. Using the host as a benchmark for redshift determination, we find that between 43 and 71 per cent of all sGRB redshifts should be missed due to host faintness for hosts at $z\sim2$. The high redshift of GRB111117A is evidence against a lognormal delay-time model for sGRBs through the predicted redshift distribution of sGRBs, which is very sensitive to high-$z$ sGRBs. From the age of the universe at the time of GRB explosion, an initial neutron star (NS) separation of $a_0 < 3.2~R_\odot$ is required in the case where the progenitor system is a circular pair of inspiralling NSs. This constraint excludes some of the longest sGRB formation channels for this burst.
  • We present a catalog of early-time (~10^2-10^4s) photometry and polarimetry of all Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) optical afterglows observed with RINGO2 imaging polarimeter on the Liverpool Telescope. For the 19 optical afterglows observed, the following 9 were bright enough to perform photometry and attempt polarimetry: GRB 100805A, GRB 101112A, GRB 110205A, GRB 110726A, GRB 120119A, GRB 120308A, GRB 120311A, GRB 120326A and GRB 120327A. We present multi-wavelength light curves for these 9 GRBs, together with estimates of their optical polarization degrees and/or limits. We carry out a thorough investigation of detection probabilities, instrumental properties and systematics. Using two independent methods, we confirm previous reports of significant polarization in GRB 110205A and 120308A, and report new detection of $P=6^{+3}_{-2}\%$ in GRB101112A. We discuss the results for the sample in the context of the reverse and forward shock afterglow scenario, and show that GRBs with detectable optical polarization at early time have clearly identifiable signatures of reverse-shock emission in their optical light curves. This supports the idea that GRB ejecta contain large-scale magnetic fields and highlights the importance of rapid-response polarimetry.
  • Star forming galaxies have long been considered the dominant sources of the cosmic ultraviolet background radiation at early epochs. However, observing and characterizing the galaxy population with significant ionizing emission has proven to be challenging. In particular, the fraction of ionizing radiation that escapes the local environment to the intergalactic medium is poorly known. We investigate the relation between the escape fraction and galaxy luminosity. We combine the deep ultraviolet observations of Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UVUDF) with the deep Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) observations of the same field, collecting a sample of 165 faint star forming galaxies in the $3 < z < 4$ redshift range with deep rest-frame observations of the Lyman continuum. In our sample, we do not find any galaxy with significant emission of LyC radiation. We bin the galaxies in various redshift and brightness intervals and stack their images. From stacked images we estimate the relative escape fraction upper limits as a function of the luminosity. Thanks to the depth of the sample we measure meaningful 1$\sigma$ upper limits of $f_{esc,rel} < 0.07, 0.2$ and 0.6 at $L \sim L_{\rm z=3}^{*}, 0.5L_{\rm z=3}^{*}$ and $0.1L_{\rm z=3}^{*}$, respectively. We use our estimates and theoretical predictions from the literature to study a possible dependence of the escape fraction on galaxy luminosity by modelling the ionizing background with different prescriptions of $f_{\rm esc} (M_{\rm UV})$. We show that the understanding of the luminosity dependence hinges on the ability to constrain the escape fraction down to $M_{\rm UV} \sim -18$ mag in the future.
  • We investigate the existence of a metallicity threshold for the production of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). We used the host galaxies of the Swift/BAT6 sample of LGRBs. We considered the stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and metallicity determined from the host galaxy photometry and spectroscopy up to z = 2 and used them to compare the distribution of host galaxies to that of field galaxies in the mass-metallicity and fundamental metallicity relation plane. We find that although LGRBs also form in galaxies with relatively large stellar masses, the large majority of host galaxies have metallicities below log(O=H)~8.6. The extension to z = 2 results in a good sampling of stellar masses also above Log(Mstar/Msun)~9.5 and provides evidence that LGRB host galaxies do not follow the fundamental metallicity relation. As shown by the comparison with dedicated numerical simulations of LGRB host galaxy population, these results are naturally explained by the existence of a mild (~0.7 Zsun) threshold for the LGRB formation. The present statistics does not allow us to discriminate between different shapes of the metallicity cutoff, but the relatively high metallicity threshold found in this work is somewhat in disagreement to most of the standard single-star models for LGRB progenitors.
  • We present the extensive follow-up campaign on the afterglow of GRB 110715A at 17 different wavelengths, from X-ray to radio bands, starting 81 seconds after the burst and extending up to 74 days later. We performed for the first time a GRB afterglow observation with the ALMA observatory. We find that the afterglow of GRB 110715A is very bright at optical and radio wavelengths. We use optical and near infrared spectroscopy to provide further information about the progenitor's environment and its host galaxy. The spectrum shows weak absorption features at a redshift z = 0.8225, which reveal a host galaxy environment with low ionization, column density and dynamical activity. Late deep imaging shows a very faint galaxy, consistent with the spectroscopic results. The broadband afterglow emission is modelled with synchrotron radiation using a numerical algorithm and we determine the best fit parameters using Bayesian inference in order to constrain the physical parameters of the jet and the medium in which the relativistic shock propagates. We fitted our data with a variety of models, including different density profiles and energy injections. Although the general behaviour can be roughly described by these models, none of them are able to fully explain all data points simultaneously. GRB 110715A shows the complexity of reproducing extensive multi-wavelength broadband afterglow observations, and the need of good sampling in wavelength and time and more complex models to accurately constrain the physics of GRB afterglows.
  • Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) and superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are both explosive transients with very massive progenitor stars. Clues about the nature of the progenitors can be found by investigating environments in which such transients occur. While studies of LGRB host galaxies have a long history, dedicated observational campaigns have only recently resulted in a high enough number of photometrically and spectroscopically observed SLSN hosts to allow statistically significant analysis of their properties. In this paper we make a comparison of the host galaxies of hydrogen-poor (H-poor) SLSNe and the Swift/BAT6 sample of LGRBs. In contrast to previous studies we use a complete sample of LGRBs and we address a special attention to the comparison methodology and the selection of SLSN sample whose data have been compiled from the available literature. At intermediate redshifts (0.3 < z < 0.7) the two classes of transients select galaxies whose properties (stellar mass, luminosity, star-formation rate, specific star-formation rate and metallicity) do not differ on average significantly. Moreover, the host galaxies of both classes of objects follow the fundamental metallicity relation and the fundamental plane of metallicity. In contrast to previous studies we show that at intermediate redshifts the emission line equivalent widths of the two populations are essentially the same and that the previous claims regarding the higher fraction of SLSN hosts among the extreme emission line galaxies with respect to LGRBs are mostly due to a larger fraction of strong-line emitters among SLSN hosts at z < 0.3, where samples of LGRB hosts are small and poorly defined.
  • Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive stars and could thus be a potentially powerful tool to trace cosmic star formation. However, especially at low redshifts (z < 1.5) LGRBs seem to prefer particular types of environment. Our aim is to study the host galaxies of a complete sample of bright LGRBs to investigate the impact of the environment on GRB formation. We study host galaxy spectra of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of 14 z < 1 bright LGRBs. We use the detected nebular emission lines to measure the dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR) and nebular metallicity (Z) of the hosts and supplement the data set with previously measured stellar masses M$_{\star}$. The distributions of the obtained properties and their interrelations (e.g. mass-metallicity and SFR-M$_{\star}$ relations) are compared to samples of field star-forming galaxies.We find that LGRB hosts at z < 1 have on average lower SFRs than if they were direct star-formation tracers. By directly comparing metallicity distributions of LGRB hosts and star-forming galaxies, we find a good match between the two populations up to Z $\sim 8.4-8.5$, after which the paucity of metal-rich LGRB hosts becomes apparent. The LGRB host galaxies of our complete sample are not inconsistent with the mass-metallicity relation at similar mean redshift and stellar masses. The cutoff against high metallicities (and high masses) can explain the low SFR values of LGRB hosts. We find a hint of increased incidence of starburst galaxies in the Swift/BAT6 z < 1 sample with respect to that of a field star-forming population. Given that the SFRs are low on average, the latter is ascribed to low stellar masses. Nevertheless the limits on the completeness and metallicity availability of current surveys, coupled with the limited number of LGRB host galaxies, prevent us from reaching more quantitative conclusions.
  • [Abridged] We present data and initial results from VLT/X-Shooter emission-line spectroscopy of 96 GRB-selected galaxies at 0.1<z<3.6, the largest sample of GRB host spectroscopy available to date. Most of our GRBs were detected by Swift and 76% are at 0.5<z<2.5 with a median z~1.6. Based on Balmer and/or forbidden lines of oxygen, nitrogen, and neon, we measure systemic redshifts, star formation rates (SFRs), visual attenuations, oxygen abundances (12+log(O/H)), and emission-line widths. We find a strong change of the typical physical properties of GRB hosts with redshift. The median SFR, for example, increases from ~0.6 M_sun/yr at z~0.6 up to ~15 M_sun/yr at z~2. A higher ratio of [OIII]/[OII] at higher redshifts leads to an increasing distance of GRB-selected galaxies to the locus of local galaxies in the BPT diagram. Oxygen abundances of the galaxies are distributed between 12+log(O/H)=7.9 and 12+log(O/H)=9.0 with a median of 12+log(O/H)~8.5. The fraction of GRB-selected galaxies with super-solar metallicities is around 20% at z<1 in the adopted metallicity scale. This is significantly less than the fraction of star formation in similar galaxies, illustrating that GRBs are scarce in high-metallicity environments. At z~3, sensitivity limits us to probing only the most luminous GRB hosts for which we derive metallicities of Z ~< 0.5 Z_sun. Together with a high incidence of galaxies with similar metallicity in our sample at z~1.5, this indicates that the metallicity dependence observed at low redshift will not be dominant at z~3.
  • Gamma-ray burst GRB 140430A was detected by the Swift satellite and observed promptly with the imaging polarimeter RINGO3 mounted on the Liverpool Telescope, with observations beginning while the prompt $\gamma$-ray emission was still ongoing. In this paper, we present densely sampled (10-second temporal resolution) early optical light curves in 3 optical bands and limits to the degree of optical polarization. We compare optical, X-ray and gamma-ray properties and present an analysis of the optical emission during a period of high-energy flaring. The complex optical light curve cannot be explained merely with a combination of forward and reverse shock emission from a standard external shock, implying additional contribution of emission from internal shock dissipation. We estimate an upper limit for time averaged optical polarization during the prompt phase to be as low as P < 12% (1$\sigma$). This suggests that the optical flares and early afterglow emission in this GRB are not highly polarized. Alternatively, time averaging could mask the presence of otherwise polarized components of distinct origin at different polarization position angles.
  • LGRBs are associated with massive stars and are therefore linked to star formation. The conditions necessary to produce LGRBs can affect the relation between the LGRB rate and star formation. By using the power of a complete LGRB sample, our aim is to understand whether such a bias exists and, if it does, what is its origin. In this first paper, we build the SED of the z<1 host galaxies of the BAT6 LGRB sample, and determine their stellar masses from SED fitting. We compare the resulting stellar mass distribution (i) with star-forming galaxies observed in deep surveys (UltraVISTA); (ii) with semi-analitical models of the z<1 star forming galaxy population and (iii) with numerical simulations of LGRB hosts having different metallicity thresholds for the progenitor star environment. We find that at z<1 LGRBs tend to avoid massive galaxies and are powerful in selecting faint low-mass star-forming galaxies. The stellar mass distribution of the hosts is not consistent with that of the UltraVISTA star-forming galaxies weighted for their SFR. This implies that, at least at z<1, LGRBs are not unbiased tracers of star formation. To make the two distributions consistent, a much steeper faint-end of the mass function would be required, or a very shallow SFR-Mass relation for the low mass galaxy population. GRB host galaxy simulations indicates that, to reproduce the stellar mass distribution, a metallicity threshold of the order of Z_th=0.3-0.5Z_sun is necessary. Models without a metallicity threshold or with an extreme threshold of Z_th = 0.1Z_sun are excluded at z<1. The use of the BAT6 complete sample makes this result not affected by possible biases which could have influenced past results based on incomplete samples. The preference for low metallicities (Z<~0.5Z_sun) can be a consequence of the particular conditions needed for the progenitor star to produce a GRB. (Abridged)
  • Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the death of massive stars. Their host galaxies therefore represent a unique class of objects tracing star formation across the observable Universe. Indeed, recently accumulated evidence shows that GRB hosts do not differ substantially from general population of galaxies at high (z > 2) redshifts. However, it has been long recognised that the properties of z < 1.5 hosts, compared to general star-forming population, are unusual. To better understand the reasons for the supposed difference in LGRB hosts properties at z < 1.5, we obtained VLT/X- Shooter spectra of six hosts lying in the redshift range of 0.8 < z < 1.3. Some of these hosts have been observed before, yet we still lack well constrained information on their characteristics such as metallicity, dust extinction and star formation rate. We search for emission lines in the VLT/X-Shooter spectra of the hosts and measure their fluxes. We perform a detailed analysis, estimating host average extinction, star-formation rates, metallicities and electron densities where possible. Measured quantities of our hosts are compared to a larger sample of previously observed GRB hosts at z < 2. Star-formation rates and metallicities are measured for all the hosts analyzed in this paper and metallicities are well determined for 4 hosts. The mass-metallicity relation, the fundamental metallicity relation and SFRs derived from our hosts occupy similar parameter space as other host galaxies investigated so-far at the same redshift. We therefore conclude that GRB hosts in our sample support the found discrepancy between the properties of low-redshift GRB hosts and the general population of star- forming galaxies.
  • High-redshift gamma-ray bursts have several advantages for the study of the distant universe, providing unique information about the structure and properties of the galaxies in which they exploded. Spectroscopic identification with large ground-based telescopes has improved our knowledge of the class of such distant events. We present the multi-wavelength analysis of the high-$z$ Swift gamma-ray burst GRB140515A ($z = 6.327$). The best estimate of the neutral hydrogen fraction of the intergalactic medium (IGM) towards the burst is $x_{HI} \leq 0.002$. The spectral absorption lines detected for this event are the weakest lines ever observed in gamma-ray burst afterglows, suggesting that GRB140515A exploded in a very low density environment. Its circum-burst medium is characterised by an average extinction (A$_{\rm V} \sim 0.1$) that seems to be typical of $z \ge 6$ events. The observed multi-band light curves are explained either with a very flat injected spectrum ($p = 1.7$) or with a multi-component emission ($p = 2.1$). In the second case a long-lasting central engine activity is needed in order to explain the late time X-ray emission. The possible origin of GRB140515A from a Pop III (or from a Pop II stars with local environment enriched by Pop III) massive star is unlikely.
  • Gamma Ray Bursts are detectable in the gamma-ray band if their jets are oriented towards the observer. However, for each GRB with a typical theta_jet, there should be ~2/theta_jet^2 bursts whose emission cone is oriented elsewhere in space. These off-axis bursts can be eventually detected when, due to the deceleration of their relativistic jets, the beaming angle becomes comparable to the viewing angle. Orphan Afterglows (OA) should outnumber the current population of bursts detected in the gamma-ray band even if they have not been conclusively observed so far at any frequency. We compute the expected flux of the population of orphan afterglows in the mm, optical and X-ray bands through a population synthesis code of GRBs and the standard afterglow emission model. We estimate the detection rate of OA by on-going and forthcoming surveys. The average duration of OA as transients above a given limiting flux is derived and described with analytical expressions: in general OA should appear as daily transients in optical surveys and as monthly/yearly transients in the mm/radio band. We find that ~ 2 OA yr^-1 could already be detected by Gaia and up to 20 OA yr^-1 could be observed by the ZTF survey. A larger number of 50 OA yr^-1 should be detected by LSST in the optical band. For the X-ray band, ~ 26 OA yr^-1 could be detected by the eROSITA. For the large population of OA detectable by LSST, the X-ray and optical follow up of the light curve (for the brightest cases) and/or the extensive follow up of their emission in the mm and radio band could be the key to disentangle their GRB nature from other extragalactic transients of comparable flux density.
  • We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parametrization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. (2007) and Melandri et al. (2010) in which the typical frequency of the reverse shock was suggested to lie at radio, rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct reverse-shock radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1 -- 1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects - typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical reverse-shock emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/mm emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency reverse shocks at early time.
  • In this work we use gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra observed with the VLT/X-shooter spectrograph to measure rest-frame extinction in GRB lines-of-sight by modeling the broadband near-infrared (NIR) to X-ray afterglow spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Our sample consists of nine Swift GRBs, eight of them belonging to the long-duration and one to the short-duration class. Dust is modeled using the average extinction curves of the Milky Way and the two Magellanic Clouds. We derive the rest-frame extinction of the entire sample, which fall in the range $0 \lesssim {\it A}_{\rm V} \lesssim 1.2$. Moreover, the SMC extinction curve is the preferred extinction curve template for the majority of our sample, a result which is in agreement with those commonly observed in GRB lines-of-sights. In one analysed case (GRB 120119A), the common extinction curve templates fail to reproduce the observed extinction. To illustrate the advantage of using the high-quality X-shooter afterglow SEDs over the photometric SEDs, we repeat the modeling using the broadband SEDs with the NIR-to-UV photometric measurements instead of the spectra. The main result is that the spectroscopic data, thanks to a combination of excellent resolution and coverage of the blue part of the SED, are more successful in constraining the extinction curves and therefore the dust properties in GRB hosts with respect to photometric measurements. In all cases but one the extinction curve of one template is preferred over the others. We show that the modeled values of the extinction and the spectral slope, obtained through spectroscopic and photometric SED analysis, can differ significantly for individual events. Finally we stress that, regardless of the resolution of the optical-to-NIR data, the SED modeling gives reliable results only when the fit is performed on a SED covering a broader spectral region.
  • The long ${\it Swift}$ gamma-ray burst GRB 120326A at redshift $z=1.798$ exhibited a multi-band light curve with a striking feature: a late-time, long-lasting achromatic rebrightening, rarely seen in such events. Peaking in optical and X-ray bands $\sim 35$ ks ($\sim 12.5$ ks in the GRB rest frame) after the 70-s GRB prompt burst, the feature brightens nearly two orders of magnitude above the underlying optical power-law decay. Modelling the multiwavelength light curves, we investigate possible causes of the rebrightening in the context of the standard fireball model. We exclude a range of scenarios for the origin of this feature: reverse-shock flash, late-time forward shock peak due to the passage of the maximal synchrotron frequency through the optical band, late central engine optical/X-ray flares, interaction between the expanding blast wave and a density enhancement in the circumburst medium and gravitational microlensing. Instead we conclude that the achromatic rebrightening may be caused by a refreshed forward shock or a geometrical effect. In addition, we identify an additional component after the end of the prompt emission, that shapes the observed X-ray and optical light curves differently, ruling out a single overall emission component to explain the observed early time emission.
  • Context. Gamma-ray burst (GRBs) afterglows probe sightlines to star-forming regions in distant star-forming galaxies. Here we present a study of the peculiar afterglow spectrum of the z = 0.889 Swift GRB 140506A. Aims. Our aim is to understand the origin of the very unusual properties of the absorption along the line-of-sight. Methods. We analyse spectroscopic observations obtained with the X-shooter spectrograph mounted on the ESO/VLT at two epochs 8.8 h and 33 h after the burst as well as imaging from the GROND instrument. We also present imaging and spectroscopy of the host galaxy obtained with the Magellan telescope. Results. The underlying afterglow appears to be a typical afterglow of a long-duration GRB. However, the material along the line-of- sight has imprinted very unusual features on the spectrum. Firstly, there is a very broad and strong flux drop below 8000 AA (4000 AA in the rest frame), which seems to be variable between the two spectroscopic epochs. We can reproduce the flux-drops both as a giant 2175 AA extinction bump and as an effect of multiple scattering on dust grains in a dense environment. Secondly, we detect absorption lines from excited H i and He i. We also detect molecular absorption from CH+ . Conclusions. We interpret the unusual properties of these spectra as reflecting the presence of three distinct regions along the line-of-sight: the excited He i absorption originates from an H ii-region, whereas the Balmer absorption must originate from an associated photodissociation region. The strong metal line and molecular absorption and the dust extinction must originate from a third, cooler region along the line-of-sight. The presence of (at least) three separate regions is reflected in the fact that the different absorption components have different velocities relative to the systemic redshift of the host galaxy.
  • Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are produced by the collapse of very massive stars. Due to the short lifetime of their progenitors, LGRBs pinpoint star-forming galaxies. We present here a multi-band search for the host galaxy of the long dark GRB 050219A within the enhanced Swift/XRT error circle. We used spectroscopic observations acquired with VLT/X-shooter to determine the redshift and star-formation rate of the putative host galaxy. We compared the results with the optical/IR spectral energy distribution obtained with different facilities. Surprisingly, the host galaxy is a old and quiescent early-type galaxy at z = 0.211 characterised by an unprecedentedly low specific star-formation rate. It is the first LGRB host to be also an early-type post-starburst galaxy. This is further evidence that GRBs can explode in all kind of galaxies, with the only requirement being an episode of star-formation.
  • We use a parent sample of 118 gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, with known redshift and host galaxy extinction, to separate afterglows with and without signatures of dominant reverse-shock emission and to determine which physical conditions lead to a prominent reverse-shock emission. We identify 10 GRBs with reverse shock signatures - GRBs 990123, 021004, 021211, 060908, 061126, 080319B, 081007, 090102, 090424 and 130427A. By modeling their optical afterglows with reverse and forward shock analytic light curves and using Monte Carlo simulations, we estimate the parameter space of the physical quantities describing the ejecta and circumburst medium. We find that physical properties cover a wide parameter space and do not seem to cluster around any preferential values. Comparing the rest-frame optical, X-ray and high-energy properties of the larger sample of non-RS-dominated GRBs, we show that the early-time ($<$ 1ks) optical spectral luminosity, X-ray afterglow luminosity and $\gamma$-ray energy output of our reverse-shock dominated sample do not differ significantly from the general population at early times. However, the GRBs with dominant reverse shock emission have fainter than average optical forward-shock emission at late time ($>$ 10 ks). We find that GRBs with an identifiable reverse shock component show high magnetization parameter $R_{\mathrm{B}} = \varepsilon_{\rm B,r}/\varepsilon_{\rm B,f} \sim 2 - 10^4$. Our results are in agreement with the mildly magnetized baryonic jet model of GRBs.
  • Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars, and are typically found in the distant Universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity ($L\sim 3 \times 10^{53}$ erg s$^{-1}$) and its relative proximity ($z=0.34$), GRB 130427A was a unique event that reached the highest fluence observed in the gamma-ray band. Here we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-m Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early Universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.
  • We use high--quality, multi-band observations of Swift GRB120404A, from gamma-ray to radio frequencies, together with the new hydrodynamics code of van Eerten et al. (2012) to test the standard synchrotron shock model. The evolution of the radio and optical afterglow, with its prominent optical rebrightening at t_rest 260-2600 s, is remarkably well modelled by a decelerating jet viewed close to the jet edge, combined with some early re-energization of the shock. We thus constrain the geometry of the jet with half-opening and viewing angles of 23 and 21 deg respectively and suggest that wide jets viewed off-axis are more common in GRBs than previously thought. We also derive the fireball microphysics parameters epsilon_B=2.4e-4 and epsilon_e=9.3e-2 and a circumburst density of n=240 cm^-3. The ability to self-consistently model the microphysics parameters and jet geometry in this way offers an alternative to trying to identify elusive canonical jet breaks at late times. The mismatch between the observed and model-predicted X-ray fluxes is explained by the local rather than the global cooling approximation in the synchrotron radiation model, constraining the microphysics of particle acceleration taking place in a relativistic shock and, in turn, emphasising the need for a more realistic treatment of cooling in future developments of theoretical models. Finally, our interpretation of the optical peak as due to the passage of the forward shock synchrotron frequency highlights the importance of high quality multi-band data to prevent some optical peaks from being erroneously attributed to the onset of fireball deceleration.