• We present multi-wavelength follow-up campaigns by the AstroSat-CZTI and GROWTH collaborations to search for an electromagnetic counterpart to the gravitational wave event GW170104. At the time of the GW170104 trigger, the AstroSat CZTI field-of-view covered 50.3\% of the sky localization. We do not detect any hard X-ray (>100 keV) signal at this time, and place an upper limit of $\approx 4.5 \times 10^{-7}~{\rm erg~cm}^{-2}{\rm~s}^{-1}$ for a 1\,s timescale. Separately, the ATLAS survey reported a rapidly fading optical source dubbed ATLAS17aeu in the error circle of GW170104. Our panchromatic investigation of ATLAS17aeu shows that it is the afterglow of an unrelated long, soft GRB~170105A, with only a fortuitous spatial coincidence with GW170104. We then discuss the properties of this transient in the context of standard long GRB afterglow models.
  • We report the first maximum-light far-Ultraviolet to near-infrared spectra (1000A - 1.62um, rest) of a H-poor superluminous supernova, Gaia16apd. At z=0.1018, it is one of the closest and the UV brightest such events, with 17.4 (AB) magnitude in Swift UV band (1928A) at -11days pre-maximum. Assuming an exponential form, we derived the rise time of 33days and the peak bolometric luminosity of 3x10^{44}ergs^-1. At maximum light, the estimated photospheric temperature and velocity are 17,000K and 14,000kms^-1 respectively. The inferred radiative and kinetic energy are roughly 1x10^{51} and 2x10^{52}erg. Gaia16apd is extremely UV luminous, emitting 50% of its total luminosity at 1000 - 2500A. Compared to the UV spectra (normalized at 3100A) of well studied SN1992A (Ia), SN2011fe(Ia), SN1999em (IIP) and SN1993J (IIb), it has orders of magnitude more far-UV emission. This excess is interpreted primarily as a result of weaker metal line blanketing due to much lower abundance of iron-group elements in the outer ejecta. Because these elements originate either from the natal metallicity of the star, or have been newly produced, our observation provides direct evidence that little of these freshly synthesized material, including 56Ni, was mixed into the outer ejecta, and the progenitor metallicity is likely sub-solar. This disfavors Pair-Instability Supernova (PISN) models with Helium core masses >=90Msun, where substantial 56Ni material is produced. Higher photospheric temperature of Gaia16apd than that of normal SNe may also contribute to the observed far-UV excess. We find some indication that UV luminous SLSNe-I like Gaia16apd could be common. Using the UV spectra, we show that WFIRST could detect SLSNe-I out to redshift of 8.
  • SN 2014J in M82 is the closest Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in decades. The proximity allows for detailed studies of supernova physics and provides insights into the circumstellar and interstellar environment. In this work we analyze Spitzer mid-IR data of SN 2014J in the 3.6 and 4.5 {\mu}m wavelength range, together with several other nearby and well-studied SNe Ia. We compile the first composite mid-IR light-curve templates from our sample of SNe~Ia, spanning the range from before peak brightness well into the nebular phase. Our observations indicate that SNe Ia form a very homogeneous class of objects at these wavelengths. Using the low-reddening supernovae for comparison, we constrain possible thermal emission from circumstellar dust around the highly reddened SN 2014J. We also study SNe 2006X and 2007le, where the presence of matter in the circumstellar environment has been suggested. No significant mid-IR excess is detected, allowing us to place upper limits on the amount of pre-existing dust in the circumstellar environment. For SN 2014J, $M_{dust} < 10^{-5}$ M$_{\odot}$ within $r_{dust} \sim 10^{17}$ cm, which is insufficient to account for the observed extinction. Similar limits are obtained for SNe 2006X and 2007le.
  • We present the results of optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared observations of M101 OT2015-1 (PSN J14021678+5426205), a luminous red transient in the Pinwheel galaxy (M101), spanning a total of 16 years. The lightcurve showed two distinct peaks with absolute magnitudes $M_r\leq-12.4$ and $M_r \simeq-12$, on 2014 November 11 and 2015 February 17, respectively. The spectral energy distributions during the second maximum show a cool outburst temperature of $\approx$3700 K and low expansion velocities ($\approx-$300 \kms) for the H I, Ca II, Ba II and K I lines. From archival data spanning 15 to 8 years before the outburst, we find a single source consistent with the optically discovered transient which we attribute to being the progenitor; it has properties consistent with being an F-type yellow supergiant with $L$~$\sim$~8.7~$\times\ 10^4$ \Lsun, $T_{\rm{eff}}\approx$7000~K and an estimated mass of $\rm{M1}= 18\pm 1$ \Msun. This star has likely just finished the H burning phase in the core, started expanding, and is now crossing the Hertzsprung gap. Based on the combination of observed properties, we argue that the progenitor is a binary system, with the more evolved system overfilling the Roche lobe. Comparison with binary evolution models suggests that the outburst was an extremely rare phenomenon, likely associated with the ejection of the common envelope. The initial mass of the binary progenitor system fills the gap between the merger candidates V838 Mon (5$-$10 \Msun) and NGC~4490-OT~(30~\Msun).
  • In recent years, millisecond duration radio signals originating from distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called Fast Radio Bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. While every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, none before now have had a redshift measurement, due to the difficulty in pinpointing their celestial coordinates. Here we present the discovery of a fast radio burst and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting $\sim 6$ days after the event, which we use to identify the host galaxy; we measure the galaxy's redshift to be $z=0.492\pm0.008$. The dispersion measure and redshift, in combination, provide a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionised baryons in the intergalactic medium of $\Omega_{\mathrm{IGM}}=4.9 \pm 1.3\%$, in agreement with the expectation from WMAP, and including all of the so-called "missing baryons". The $\sim6$-day transient is largely consistent with a short gamma-ray burst radio afterglow, and its existence and timescale do not support progenitor models such as giant pulses from pulsars, and supernovae. This contrasts with the interpretation of another recently discovered fast radio burst, suggesting there are at least two classes of bursts.
  • ASASSN-14ae is a candidate tidal disruption event (TDE) found at the center of SDSS J110840.11+340552.2 ($d\simeq200$~Mpc) by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN). We present ground-based and Swift follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations of the source, finding that the transient had a peak luminosity of $L\simeq8\times10^{43}$~erg~s$^{-1}$ and a total integrated energy of $E\simeq1.7\times10^{50}$ ergs radiated over the $\sim5$ months of observations presented. The blackbody temperature of the transient remains roughly constant at $T\sim20,000$~K while the luminosity declines by nearly 1.5 orders of magnitude during this time, a drop that is most consistent with an exponential, $L\propto e^{-t/t_0}$ with $t_0\simeq39$~days. The source has broad Balmer lines in emission at all epochs as well as a broad He II feature emerging in later epochs. We compare the color and spectral evolution to both supernovae and normal AGN to show that {\name} does not resemble either type of object and conclude that a TDE is the most likely explanation for our observations. At $z=0.0436$, ASASSN-14ae is the lowest-redshift TDE candidate discovered at optical/UV wavelengths to date, and we estimate that ASAS-SN may discover $0.1 - 3$ of these events every year in the future.
  • After the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) discovered a significant brightening of the inner region of NGC 2617, we began a ~70 day photometric and spectroscopic monitoring campaign from the X-ray through near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. We report that NGC 2617 went through a dramatic outburst, during which its X-ray flux increased by over an order of magnitude followed by an increase of its optical/ultraviolet (UV) continuum flux by almost an order of magnitude. NGC 2617, classified as a Seyfert 1.8 galaxy in 2003, is now a Seyfert 1 due to the appearance of broad optical emission lines and a continuum blue bump. Such "changing look Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN)" are rare and provide us with important insights about AGN physics. Based on the Hbeta line width and the radius-luminosity relation, we estimate the mass of central black hole to be (4 +/- 1) x 10^7 M_sun. When we cross-correlate the light curves, we find that the disk emission lags the X-rays, with the lag becoming longer as we move from the UV (2-3 days) to the NIR (6-9 days). Also, the NIR is more heavily temporally smoothed than the UV. This can largely be explained by a simple model of a thermally emitting thin disk around a black hole of the estimated mass that is illuminated by the observed, variable X-ray fluxes.
  • We discuss ASASSN-13db, an EX Lupi-type ("EXor") accretion event on the young stellar object (YSO) SDSS J051011.01$-$032826.2 (hereafter SDSSJ0510) discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). Using archival photometric data of SDSSJ0510 we construct a pre-outburst spectral energy distribution (SED) and find that it is consistent with a low-mass class II YSO near the Orion star forming region ($d \sim 420$ pc). We present follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations of the source after the $\Delta V \sim-$5.4 magnitude outburst that began in September 2013 and ended in early 2014. These data indicate an increase in temperature and luminosity consistent with an accretion rate of $\sim10^{-7}$ $\rm{M}_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, three or more orders of magnitude greater than in quiescence. Spectroscopic observations show a forest of narrow emission lines dominated by neutral metallic lines from Fe I and some low-ionization lines. The properties of ASASSN-13db are similar to those of the EXor prototype EX Lupi during its strongest observed outburst in late 2008.
  • We analyze a $\Delta V\sim-9$ magnitude flare on the newly identified M8 dwarf SDSS J022116.84+194020.4 (hereafter SDSSJ0221) detected as part of the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN). Using infrared and optical spectra, we confirm that SDSSJ0221 is a relatively nearby (d$\sim$76 pc) M8 dwarf with strong quiescent H$\alpha$ emission. Based on kinematics and the absence of features consistent with low-gravity (young) ultracool dwarfs, we place a lower limit of 200 Myr on the age of SDSSJ0221. When modeled with a simple, classical flare light-curve, this flare is consistent with a total $U$-band flare energy $E_U\sim$ 10$^{34}$ erg, confirming that the most dramatic flares are not limited to warmer, more massive stars. Scaled to include a rough estimate of the emission line contribution to the $V$ band, we estimate a blackbody filling factor of $\sim$$10-30\%$ during the flare peak and $\sim$$0.5-1.6\%$ during the flare decay phase. These filling factors correspond to flare areas that are an order of magnitude larger than those measured for most mid-M dwarf flares.