• We propose a stochastic model for gene transcription coupled to DNA supercoiling, where we incorporate the experimental observation that polymerases create supercoiling as they unwind the DNA helix, and that these enzymes bind more favourably to regions where the genome is unwound. Within this model, we show that when the transcriptionally induced flux of supercoiling increases, there is a sharp crossover from a regime where torsional stresses relax quickly and gene transcription is random, to one where gene expression is highly correlated and tightly regulated by supercoiling. In the latter regime, the model displays transcriptional bursts, waves of supercoiling, and up-regulation of divergent or bidirectional genes. It also predicts that topological enzymes which relax twist and writhe should provide a pathway to down-regulate transcription. This article has been published in Physical Review Letters, May 2016.
  • We propose a model for the formation of chromatin loops based on the diffusive sliding of a DNA-bound factor which can dimerise to form a molecular slip-link. Our slip-links mimic the behaviour of cohesin-like molecules, which, along with the CTCF protein, stabilize loops which organize the genome. By combining 3D Brownian dynamics simulations and 1D exactly solvable non-equilibrium models, we show that diffusive sliding is sufficient to account for the strong bias in favour of convergent CTCF-mediated chromosome loops observed experimentally. Importantly, our model does not require any underlying, and energetically costly, motor activity of cohesin. We also find that the diffusive motion of multiple slip-links along chromatin may be rectified by an intriguing ratchet effect that arises if slip-links bind to the chromatin at a preferred "loading site". This emergent collective behaviour is driven by a 1D osmotic pressure which is set up near the loading point, and favours the extrusion of loops which are much larger than the ones formed by single slip-links.
  • Biophysicists are modeling conformations of interphase chromosomes, often basing the strengths of interactions between segments distant on the genetic map on contact frequencies determined experimentally. Here, instead, we develop a fitting-free, minimal model: bivalent red and green "transcription factors" bind to cognate sites in runs of beads ("chromatin") to form molecular bridges stabilizing loops. In the absence of additional explicit forces, molecular dynamic simulations reveal that bound "factors' spontaneously cluster -- red with red, green with green, but rarely red with green -- to give structures reminiscent of transcription factories. Binding of just two transcription factors (or proteins) to active and inactive regions of human chromosomes yields rosettes, topological domains, and contact maps much like those seen experimentally. This emergent "bridging-induced attraction" proves to be a robust, simple, and generic force able to organize interphase chromosomes at all scales.
  • The first supernovae will soon be visible at the edge of the observable universe, revealing the birthplaces of Population III stars. With upcoming near-infrared missions, a broad analysis of the detectability of high-$z$ supernovae is paramount. We combine cosmological and radiation transport simulations, instrument specifications, and survey strategies to create synthetic observations of primeval core-collapse, Type IIn and pair-instability supernovae with the James Webb Space Telescope ($JWST$). We show that a dedicated observational campaign with the $JWST$ can detect up to $\sim 15$ pair-instability explosions, $\sim 300$ core-collapse supernovae, but less than one Type IIn explosion per year, depending on the Population III star formation history. Our synthetic survey also shows that $\approx 1-2 \times10^2$ supernovae detections, depending on the accuracy of the classification, are sufficient to discriminate between a Salpeter and flat mass distribution for high redshift stars with a confidence level greater than 99.5 per cent. We discuss how the purity of the sample affects our results and how supervised learning methods may help to discriminate between CC and PI SNe.
  • We present here the detection of a system of four low-mass planets around the bright (V=5.5) and close-by (6.5 pc) star HD219134. This is the first result of the Rocky Planet Search program with HARPS-N on the TNG in La Palma. The inner planet orbits the star in 3.0937 +/-0.0004 days, on a quasi-circular orbit with a semi-major axis of 0.0382 +/- 0.0003 AU. Spitzer observations allowed us to detect the transit of the planet in front of the star making HD219134b the nearest known transiting planet to date. From the amplitude of the radial-velocity variation (2.33 +/- 0.24 m/s) and observed depth of the transit (359 +/- 38 ppm), the planet mass and radius are estimated to be 4.46 +/- 0.47 M_{\oplus} and 1.606 +/- 0.086 R_{\oplus} leading to a mean density of 5.89 +/- 1.17 g/cc, suggesting a rocky composition. One additional planet with minimum mass of 2.67 +/- 0.59 M_{\oplus} moves on a close-in, quasi-circular orbit with a period of 6.765 +/- 0.005 days. The third planet in the system has a period of 46.78 +/- 0.16 days and a minimum mass of 8.7 +/- 1.1 M{\oplus}, at 0.234 +/- 0.002 AU from the star. Its eccentricity is 0.32 +/- 0.14. The period of this planet is close to the rotational period of the star estimated from variations of activity indicators (42.3 +/- 0.1 days). The planetary origin of the signal is, however, the preferred solution as no indication of variation at the corresponding frequency is observed for activity-sensitive parameters. Finally, a fourth additional longer-period planet of mass of 62 +/- 6 M_{\oplus} orbits the star in 1190 days, on an eccentric orbit (e=0.27 +/- 0.11) at a distance of 2.14 +/- 0.27 AU.
  • NASA's re-purposed Kepler mission -- dubbed K2 -- has brought new scientific opportunities that were not anticipated for the original Kepler mission. One science goal that makes optimal use of K2's capabilities, in particular its 360-degree ecliptic field of view, is galactic archaeology -- the study of the evolution of the Galaxy from the fossil stellar record. The thrust of this research is to exploit high-precision, time-resolved photometry from K2 in order to detect oscillations in red giant stars. This asteroseismic information can provide estimates of stellar radius (hence distance), mass and age of vast numbers of stars across the Galaxy. Here we present the initial analysis of a subset of red giants, observed towards the North Galactic Gap, during the mission's first full science campaign. We investigate the feasibility of using K2 data for detecting oscillations in red giants that span a range in apparent magnitude and evolutionary state (hence intrinsic luminosity). We demonstrate that oscillations are detectable for essentially all cool giants within the $\log g$ range $\sim 1.9-3.2$. Our detection is complete down to $\mathit{Kp}\sim 14.5$, which results in a seismic sample with little or no detection bias. This sample is ideally suited to stellar population studies that seek to investigate potential shortcomings of contemporary Galaxy models.
  • Zinc dialkyldithiophosphates (ZDDPs) are one of the most common anti-wear additives present in commercially-available motor oils. The ZDDP concentrations of motor oils are most commonly determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). As part of an undergraduate research project, we have determined the Zn concentrations of eight commercially-available motor oils and one oil additive using neutron activation analysis (NAA), which has potential for greater accuracy and less sensitivity to matrix effects as compared to ICP-AES. The 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectra were also obtained for several oil additive samples which have been heated to various temperatures in order to study the thermal decomposition of ZDDPs.
  • Results of decay spectroscopy on nuclei in vicinity of the doubly magic 48Ni are presented. The measurements were performed with a Time Projection Chamber with optical readout which records tracks of ions and protons in the gaseous volume. Six decays of 48Ni including four events of two-proton ground-state radioactivity were recorded. An advanced reconstruction procedure yielded the 2p decay energy for 48Ni of Q2p = 1.29(4) MeV. In addition, the energy spectra of \b{eta}-delayed protons emitted in the decays of 44Cr and 46Fe, as well as half-lives and branching ratios were determined. The results were found to be consistent with the previous measurements made with Si detectors. A new proton line in the decay of 44Cr corresponding to the decay energy of 760 keV is reported. The first evidence for the \b{eta}2p decay of 46 Fe, based on one clear event, is shown.
  • We present ~47,000 periodic variables found during the analysis of 5.4 million variable star candidates within a 20,000 square degree region covered by the Catalina Surveys Data Release-1 (CSDR1). Combining these variables with type-ab RR Lyrae from our previous work, we produce an on-line catalog containing periods, amplitudes, and classifications for ~61,000 periodic variables. By cross-matching these variables with those from prior surveys, we find that > 90% of the ~8,000 known periodic variables in the survey region are recovered. For these sources we find excellent agreement between our catalog and prior values of luminosity, period and amplitude, as well as classification. We investigate the rate of confusion between objects classified as contact binaries and type-c RR Lyrae (RRc's) based on periods, colours, amplitudes, metalicities, radial velocities and surface gravities. We find that no more than few percent of these variables in these classes are misidentified. By deriving distances for this clean sample of ~5,500 RRc's, we trace the path of the Sagittarius tidal streams within the Galactic halo. Selecting 146 outer-halo RRc's with SDSS radial velocities, we confirm the presence of a coherent halo structure that is inconsistent with current N-body simulations of the Sagittarius tidal stream. We also find numerous long-period variables that are very likely associated within the Sagittarius tidal streams system. Based on the examination of 31,000 contact binary light curves we find evidence for two subgroups exhibiting irregular lightcurves. One subgroup presents significant variations in mean brightness that are likely due to chromospheric activity. The other subgroup shows stable modulations over more than a thousand days and thereby provides evidence that the O'Connell effect is not due to stellar spots.
  • We investigate the chemo-kinematic properties of the Milky Way disc by exploring the first year of data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and compare our results to smaller optical high-resolution samples in the literature, as well as results from lower resolution surveys such as GCS, SEGUE and RAVE. We start by selecting a high-quality sample in terms of chemistry ($\sim$ 20.000 stars) and, after computing distances and orbital parameters for this sample, we employ a number of useful subsets to formulate constraints on Galactic chemical and chemodynamical evolution processes in the Solar neighbourhood and beyond (e.g., metallicity distributions -- MDFs, [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams, and abundance gradients). Our red giant sample spans distances as large as 10 kpc from the Sun. We find remarkable agreement between the recently published local (d $<$ 100 pc) high-resolution high-S/N HARPS sample and our local HQ sample (d $<$ 1 kpc). The local MDF peaks slightly below solar metallicity, and exhibits an extended tail towards [Fe/H] $= -$1, whereas a sharper cut-off is seen at larger metallicities. The APOGEE data also confirm the existence of a gap in the [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] abundance diagram. When expanding our sample to cover three different Galactocentric distance bins, we find the high-[$\alpha$/Fe] stars to be rare towards the outer zones, as previously suggested in the literature. For the gradients in [Fe/H] and [$\alpha$/Fe], measured over a range of 6 $ < $ R $ <$ 11 kpc in Galactocentric distance, we find a good agreement with the gradients traced by the GCS and RAVE dwarf samples. For stars with 1.5 $<$ z $<$ 3 kpc, we find a positive metallicity gradient and a negative gradient in [$\alpha$/Fe].
  • We report a new, high-precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio \mu_p G_E/G_M for the four-momentum transfer squared Q^2 = 0.3-0.7 (GeV/c)^2. The measurement was performed at Jefferson Lab (JLab) in Hall A using recoil polarimetry. With a total uncertainty of approximately 1%, the new data clearly show that the deviation of the ratio \mu_p G_E/G_M from unity observed in previous polarization measurements at high Q^2 continues down to the lowest Q^2 value of this measurement. The updated global fit that includes the new results yields an electric (magnetic) form factor roughly 2% smaller (1% larger) than the previous global fit in this Q^2 range. We obtain new extractions of the proton electric and magnetic radii, which are <r^2_E>^(1/2)=0.875+/-0.010 fm and <r^2_M>^(1/2)=0.867+/-0.020 fm. The charge radius is consistent with other recent extractions based on the electron-proton interaction, including the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements, which suggests a missing correction in the comparison of measurements of the proton charge radius using electron probes and the recent extraction from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift.
  • We present a method of analyzing a set of N time signals f_i(t) that consist of local measurements of the same physical observable taken at N sequential locations Z_i along the length of an experimental device. The result is an algorithm for reconstructing an approximation F(z,t) of the field f(z,t) in the inaccessible regions between the points of measurement. We also explore the conditions needed for this approximation to hold, and test the algorithm under a variety of conditions. We apply this method to analyze the magnetic field measurements taken on the Compact Toroid Injection eXperiment (CTIX) plasma accelerator; providing a direct means of visualizing experimental data, quantifying global properties, and benchmarking simulation.
  • We report the discovery of a massive (Mp = 9.04+/-0.50 MJup) planet transiting the bright (V = 8.7) F8 star HD 147506, with an orbital period of 5.63341+/-0.00013 days and an eccentricity of e = 0.520+/-0.010. From the transit light curve we determine that the radius of the planet is Rp = 0.982^{+0.038}_{0.105}RJup. HD 147506b (also coined HAT-P-2b) has a mass about 9 times the average mass of previously-known transiting exoplanets, and a density of rho = 11.9 g cm-3, greater than that of rocky planets like the Earth. Its mass and radius are marginally consistent with theories of structure of massive giant planets composed of pure H and He, and may require a large (~100 Earth mass) core to account for. The high eccentricity causes a 9-fold variation of insolation of the planet between peri- and apastron. Using follow-up photometry, we find that the center of transit is Tmid = 2,454,212.8559 +/- 0.0007 (HJD), and the transit duration is 0.177 +/-0.002 d.
  • The N2K consortium is carrying out a distributed observing campaign with the Keck, Magellan and Subaru telescopes, as well as the automatic photometric telescopes of Fairborn Observatory, in order to search for short-period gas giant planets around metal-rich stars. We have established a reservoir of more than 14,000 main sequence and subgiant stars, closer than 110 pc, brighter than V=10.5 and with $0.4 < B-V < 1.2$. Because the fraction of stars with planets is a sensitive function of stellar metallicity, a broadband photometric calibration has been developed to identify a subset of 2000 stars with [Fe/H] $> 0.1$ dex for this survey. We outline the strategy and report the detection of a planet orbiting the metal-rich G5IV star HD 88133 with a period of 3.41 days, semi-velocity amplitude, K=35.7 \mse and \msini = 0.29 \mjupe. Photometric observations reveal that HD 88133 is constant on the 3.415-day radial velocity period to a limit of 0.0005 mag. Despite a transit probability of 15.6%, our photometry rules out the shallow transits predicted by the large stellar radius.
  • Ti K-edge x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) was used to explore the Ti valence and coordination in Ti-activated sodium alanate. An empirical relationship was established between the Ti valence and the Ti K-edge onset based on a set of standards. This relationship was used to estimate oxidation states of the titanium catalyst in 2 mol% and 4 mol% Ti-doped NaAlH4. These results demonstrate that the formal titanium valence is zero in doped sodium alanate and nearly invariant during hydrogen cycling. A qualitative comparison of the edge fine structure suggests that the Ti is present on the surface in the form of amorphous TiAl3.