• The C-Band All-Sky Survey (C-BASS) is an all-sky full-polarisation survey at a frequency of 5 GHz, designed to provide complementary data to the all-sky surveys of WMAP and Planck, and future CMB B-mode polarization imaging surveys. The observing frequency has been chosen to provide a signal that is dominated by Galactic synchrotron emission, but suffers little from Faraday rotation, so that the measured polarization directions provide a good template for higher frequency observations, and carry direct information about the Galactic magnetic field. Telescopes in both northern and southern hemispheres with matched optical performance are used to provide all-sky coverage from a ground-based experiment. A continuous-comparison radiometer and a correlation polarimeter on each telescope provide stable imaging properties such that all angular scales from the instrument resolution of 45 arcmin up to full sky are accurately measured. The northern instrument has completed its survey and the southern instrument has started observing. We expect that C-BASS data will significantly improve the component separation analysis of Planck and other CMB data, and will provide important constraints on the properties of anomalous Galactic dust and the Galactic magnetic field.
  • Traditional radio interferometric correlators produce regular-gridded samples of the true $uv$-distribution by averaging the signal over constant, discrete time-frequency intervals. This regular sampling and averaging then translate to be irregular-gridded samples in the $uv$-space, and results in a baseline-length-dependent loss of amplitude and phase coherence, which is dependent on the distance from the image phase centre. The effect is often referred to as "decorrelation" in the $uv$-space, which is equivalent in the source domain to "smearing". This work discusses and implements a regular-gridded sampling scheme in the $uv$-space (baseline-dependent sampling) and windowing that allow for data compression, field-of-interest shaping and source suppression. The baseline-dependent sampling requires irregular-gridded sampling in the time-frequency space i.e. the time-frequency interval becomes baseline-dependent. Analytic models and simulations are used to show that decorrelation remains constant across all the baselines when applying baseline-dependent sampling and windowing. Simulations using MeerKAT telescope and the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network show that both data compression, field-of-interest shaping and outer field-of-interest suppression are achieved.
  • In radio interferometry, observed visibilities are intrinsically sampled at some interval in time and frequency. Modern interferometers are capable of producing data at very high time and frequency resolution; practical limits on storage and computation costs require that some form of data compression be imposed. The traditional form of compression is a simple averaging of the visibilities over coarser time and frequency bins. This has an undesired side effect: the resulting averaged visibilities "decorrelate", and do so differently depending on the baseline length and averaging interval. This translates into a non-trivial signature in the image domain known as "smearing", which manifests itself as an attenuation in amplitude towards off-centre sources. With the increasing fields of view and/or longer baselines employed in modern and future instruments, the trade-off between data rate and smearing becomes increasingly unfavourable. In this work we investigate alternative approaches to low-loss data compression. We show that averaging of the visibility data can be treated as a form of convolution by a boxcar-like window function, and that by employing alternative baseline-dependent window functions a more optimal interferometer smearing response may be induced. In particular, we show improved amplitude response over a chosen field of interest, and better attenuation of sources outside the field of interest. The main cost of this technique is a reduction in nominal sensitivity; we investigate the smearing vs. sensitivity trade-off, and show that in certain regimes a favourable compromise can be achieved. We show the application of this technique to simulated data from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and the European Very-long-baseline interferometry Network (EVN).
  • This paper presents a component-level comparison of the polarized v=1 J =1-0, v=2 J=1-0 and v=1 J=2-1 SiO maser emission towards the supergiant star VY CMa at milliarcsecond-scale, as observed using the VLBA at $\lambda=7$mm and $\lambda=3$mm. An earlier paper considered overall maser morphology and constraints on SiO maser excitation and pumping derived from these data. The goal of the current paper is to use the measured polarization properties of individual co-spatial components detected across multiple transitions to provide constraints on several competing theories for the transport of polarized maser emission. This approach minimizes the significant effects of spatial blending. We present several diagnostic tests designed to distinguish key features of competing theoretical models for maser polarization. The number of coincident features is limited by sensitivity however, particularly in the v=1 J=2-1 transition at 86 GHz, and deeper observations are needed. Preliminary conclusions based on the current data provide some support for: i) spin-independent solutions for linear polarization; ii) the influence of geometry on the distribution of fractional linear polarization with intensity; and, iii) $\pi/2$ rotations in linear polarization position angle arising from transitions across the Van Vleck angle ($\sin^2{\theta}=2/3$) between the maser line-of-sight and magnetic field. There is weaker evidence for several enumerated non-Zeeman explanations for circular polarization. The expected 2:1 ratio in circular polarization between J=1-0 and J=2-1 predicted by standard Zeeman theory cannot unfortunately be tested conclusively due to insufficient coincident components.
  • Circinus X-1 is a bright and highly variable X-ray binary which displays strong and rapid evolution in all wavebands. Radio flaring, associated with the production of a relativistic jet, occurs periodically on a ~17-day timescale. A longer-term envelope modulates the peak radio fluxes in flares, ranging from peaks in excess of a Jansky in the 1970s to an historic low of milliJanskys during the years 1994 to 2007. Here we report first observations of this source with the MeerKAT test array, KAT-7, part of the pathfinder development for the African dish component of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), demonstrating successful scientific operation for variable and transient sources with the test array. The KAT-7 observations at 1.9 GHz during the period 13 December 2011 to 16 January 2012 reveal in temporal detail the return to the Jansky-level events observed in the 1970s. We compare these data to contemporaneous single-dish measurements at 4.8 and 8.5 GHz with the HartRAO 26-m telescope and X-ray monitoring from MAXI. We discuss whether the overall modulation and recent dramatic brightening is likely to be due to an increase in the power of the jet due to changes in accretion rate or changing Doppler boosting associated with a varying angle to the line of sight.
  • We carry out climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE driven by ten measured or estimated climate forcings. An ensemble of climate model runs is carried out for each forcing acting individually and for all forcing mechanisms acting together. We compare side-by-side simulated climate change for each forcing, all forcings, observations, unforced variability among model ensemble members, and, if available, observed variability. Discrepancies between observations and simulations with all forcings are due to model deficiencies, inaccurate or incomplete forcings, and imperfect observations. Although there are notable discrepancies between model and observations, the fidelity is sufficient to encourage use of the model for simulations of future climate change. By using a fixed well-documented model and accurately defining the 1880-2003 forcings, we aim to provide a benchmark against which the effect of improvements in the model, climate forcings, and observations can be tested. Principal model deficiencies include unrealistically weak tropical El Nino-like variability and a poor distribution of sea ice, with too much sea ice in the Northern Hemisphere and too little in the Southern Hemisphere. The greatest uncertainties in the forcings are the temporal and spatial variations of anthropogenic aerosols and their indirect effects on clouds.
  • We investigate the issue of "dangerous human-made interference with climate" using simulations with GISS modelE driven by measured or estimated forcings for 1880-2003 and extended to 2100 for IPCC greenhouse gas scenarios as well as the 'alternative' scenario of Hansen and Sato. Identification of 'dangerous' effects is partly subjective, but we find evidence that added global warming of more than 1 degree C above the level in 2000 has effects that may be highly disruptive. The alternative scenario, with peak added forcing ~1.5 W/m2 in 2100, keeps further global warming under 1 degree C if climate sensitivity is \~3 degrees C or less for doubled CO2. We discuss three specific sub-global topics: Arctic climate change, tropical storm intensification, and ice sheet stability. Growth of non-CO2 forcings has slowed in recent years, but CO2 emissions are now surging well above the alternative scenario. Prompt actions to slow CO2 emissions and decrease non-CO2 forcings are needed to achieve the low forcing of the alternative scenario.