• Complex organic molecules are readily detected in the inner regions of the gaseous envelopes of forming protostars. In particular, molecules that contain nitrogen are interesting due to the role nitrogen plays in the development of life and the compact scales such molecules have been found to trace around forming protostars. The goal of this work is to determine the inventory of one family of nitrogen-bearing organic molecules, complex nitriles (molecules with a $-$CN functional group) towards two hot corino sources in the low-mass protostellar binary IRAS 16293$-$2422. This work explores the abundance differences between the two sources, the isotopic ratios, and the spatial extent derived from molecules containing the nitrile functional group. Using data from the Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS) obtained with ALMA we determine abundances and excitation temperatures for the detected nitriles. We also present a new method for determining the spatial structure of sources with high line density and large velocity gradients $-$ Velocity-corrected INtegrated emission (VINE) maps. We detect methyl cyanide (CH$_3$CN) as well as 5 of its isotopologues, including the detection of CHD$_2$CN which is the first detection in the ISM. We also detect ethyl cyanide (C$_2$H$_5$CN), vinyl cyanide (C$_2$H$_3$CN), and cyanoacetylene (HC$_3$N). We find that abundances are similar between IRAS 16293A and IRAS 16293B on small scales except for vinyl cyanide which is only detected towards the latter source. This suggests an important difference between the sources either in their evolutionary stage or warm-up timescales. We also detect a spatially double-peaked emission for the first time in molecular emission in the A source, suggesting that this source is showing structure related to a rotating toroid of material.
  • (Abridged) Astronomers recently started discovering exoplanets around binary systems. Therefore, understanding the formation and evolution of circumbinary disks is crucial for a complete scenario of planet formation. The aim of this paper is to present the detection of a circumbinary disk around Oph-IRS67 and analyse its structure. We present high-angular-resolution (0.4", 60 AU) observations of C17O, H13CO+ , C34S, SO2, C2H and c-C3H2 molecular transitions with ALMA at 0.8 mm. The spectrally and spatially resolved maps reveal the kinematics of the circumbinary disk as well as its chemistry. Molecular abundances are estimated using RADEX. The continuum emission reveals the presence of a circumbinary disk around the two sources. This disk has a diameter of ~620 AU and is well traced by C17O and H13CO+ emission. C2H and c-C3H2 trace a higher-density region which is spatially offset from the sources (~430 AU). Finally, SO2 shows compact emission around one of the sources, Oph-IRS67 B. The molecular transitions which trace the circumbinary disk are consistent with a Keplerian profile on disk scales (< 200 AU) and an infalling profile for envelope scales (> 200 AU). The Keplerian fit leads to a mass of 2.2 Msun. Inferred CO abundances w.r.t. H2 are comparable to the canonical ISM value of 2.7e-4. This study proves the first detection of the circumbinary disk associated with Oph-IRS67. The disk is chemically differentiated from the nearby high-density region. The lack of methanol emission suggests the extended disk dominates the mass budget in the inner- most regions of the protostellar envelope, generating a flat density profile where less material is exposed to high temperatures. Thus, complex organic molecules would be associated with lower column densities. Finally, Oph-IRS67 is a promising candidate for the detection of both circumstellar disks with higher-angular-resolution observations.
  • Searches for the prebiotically-relevant cyanamide (NH$_2$CN) towards solar-type protostars have not been reported in the literature. We here present the first detection of this species in the warm gas surrounding two solar-type protostars, using data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS) of IRAS 16293-2422 B and observations from the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer of NGC1333 IRAS2A. We furthermore detect the deuterated and $^{13}$C isotopologues of NH$_2$CN towards IRAS 16293-2422 B. This is the first detection of NHDCN in the interstellar medium. Based on a local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis, we find that the deuteration of cyanamide ($\sim$ 1.7%) is similar to that of formamide (NH$_2$CHO), which may suggest that these two molecules share NH$_2$ as a common precursor. The NH$_2$CN/NH$_2$CHO abundance ratio is about 0.2 for IRAS 16293-2422 B and 0.02 for IRAS2A, which is comparable to the range of values found for Sgr B2. We explored the possible formation of NH$_2$CN on grains through the NH$_2$ + CN reaction using the chemical model MAGICKAL. Grain-surface chemistry appears capable of reproducing the gas-phase abundance of NH$_2$CN with the correct choice of physical parameters.
  • Context. The Class 0 protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422 is an interesting target for (sub)millimeter observations due to, both, the rich chemistry toward the two main components of the binary and its complex morphology. Its proximity to Earth allows the study of its physical and chemical structure on solar system scales using high angular resolution observations. Such data reveal a complex morphology that cannot be accounted for in traditional, spherical 1D models of the envelope. Aims. The purpose of this paper is to study the environment of the two components of the binary through 3D radiative transfer modeling and to compare with data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Such comparisons can be used to constrain the protoplanetary disk structures, the luminosities of the two components of the binary and the chemistry of simple species. Methods. We present 13CO, C17O and C18O J=3-2 observations from the ALMA Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS), together with a qualitative study of the dust and gas density distribution of IRAS 16293-2422. A 3D dust and gas model including disks and a dust filament between the two protostars is constructed which qualitatively reproduces the dust continuum and gas line emission. Results and conclusions. Radiative transfer modeling of source A and B, with the density solution of an infalling, rotating collapse or a protoplanetary disk model, can match the constraints for the disk-like emission around source A and B from the observed dust continuum and CO isotopologue gas emission. If a protoplanetary disk model is used around source B, it has to have an unusually high scale-height in order to reach the dust continuum peak emission value, while fulfilling the other observational constraints. Our 3D model requires source A to be much more luminous than source B; LA ~ 18 $L_\odot$ and LB ~ 3 $L_\odot$.
  • [abridged] The enhanced degrees of deuterium fractionation observed in envelopes around protostars demonstrate the importance of chemistry at low temperatures, relevant in pre- and protostellar cores. formaldehyde is an important species in the formation of methanol and more complex molecules. Here, we present the first study of formaldehyde deuteration on small scales around the prototypical low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422 using high spatial and spectral resolution Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations. Numerous isotopologues of formaldehyde are detected, among them H$_2$C$^{17}$O, and D$_2^{13}$CO for the first time in the ISM. The large range of upper energy levels covered by the HDCO lines help constrain the excitation temperature to 106$\pm$13 K. Using the derived column densities, formaldehyde shows a deuterium fractionation of HDCO/H$_2$CO=6.5$\pm$1%, D$_2$CO/HDCO=12.8$^{+3.3}_{-4.1}$%, and D$_2$CO/H$_2$CO=0.6(4)$\pm$0.1%. The isotopic ratios derived are $^{16}$O/$^{18}$O=805, $^{18}$O/$^{17}$O=3.2 and $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C=56. The HDCO/H$_2$CO ratio is lower than found in previous studies, highlighting the uncertainties involved in interpreting single dish observations of the inner warm regions. The D$_2$CO/HDCO ratio is only slightly larger than the HDCO/H$_2$CO ratio. This is consistent with formaldehyde forming in the ice as soon as CO has frozen onto the grains, with most of the deuteration happening towards the end of the prestellar core phase. A comparison with available time-dependent chemical models indicates that the source is in the early Class 0 stage.
  • Methyl isocyanate (CH$_{3}$NCO) belongs to a select group of interstellar molecules considered to be relevant precursors in the formation of larger organic compounds, including those with peptide bonds. The molecule has only been detected in a couple of high-mass protostars and potentially on comets. A formation route on icy grains has been postulated for this molecule but experimental evidence is lacking. Here we extend the range of environments where methyl isocyanate is found, and unambiguously identify CH$_{3}$NCO through the detection of 43 unblended transitions in the ALMA Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS) of the low mass solar-type protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422. The molecule is detected toward both components of the binary with a ratio HNCO/CH$_3$NCO $\sim$4--12. The isomers CH$_{3}$CNO and CH$_3$OCN are not identified, resulting in upper abundance ratios of CH$_{3}$NCO/CH$_{3}$CNO > 100 and CH$_{3}$NCO/CH$_3$OCN > 10. The resulting abundance ratios compare well with those found for related N-containing species toward high-mass protostars. To constrain its formation, a set of cryogenic UHV experiments is performed. VUV irradiation of CH$_{4}$:HNCO mixtures at 20 K strongly indicate that methyl isocyanate can be formed in the solid-state through CH$_{3}$ and (H)NCO recombinations. Combined with gas-grain models that include this reaction, the solid-state route is found to be a plausible scenario to explain the methyl isocyanate abundances found in IRAS 16293-2422.
  • [Abridged] We present spectroscopic observations in H$_{2}$O, CO and related species with \textit{Herschel} HIFI and PACS, as well as ground-based follow-up with the JCMT and APEX in CO, HCO$^{+}$ and isotopologues, of a sample of 49 nearby ($d<$500\,pc) candidate protostars. These data are used to study the outflow and envelope properties of these sources. We also compile their continuum SEDs in order to constrain their physical properties. Water emission is dominated by shocks associated with the outflow, rather than the cooler, slower entrained outflowing gas probed by ground-based CO observations. These shocks become less energetic as sources evolve from Class 0 to Class I. The fraction of mass in the outflow relative to the total envelope (i.e. $M_{\mathrm{out}}/M_{\mathrm{env}}$) remains broadly constant between Class 0 and I. The median value ($\sim$1$\%$) is consistent with a core to star formation efficiency on the order of 50$\%$ and an outflow duty cycle on the order of 5$\%$. Entrainment efficiency, as probed by $F_{\mathrm{CO}}/\dot{M}_{\mathrm{acc}}$, is also invariant with source properties and evolutionary stage. The median value (6.3\kms{}) suggests an entrainment efficiency of between 30 and 60$\%$ if the wind is launched at $\sim$1AU. $L$[O\,{\sc i}] is strongly correlated with $L_{\mathrm{bol}}$ but not with $M_{\mathrm{env}}$, while low-$J$ CO is more closely correlated with the latter than the former. This suggests that [O\,{\sc i}] traces the present-day accretion activity while CO traces time-averaged accretion over the dynamical timescale of the outflow. $L$[O\,{\sc i}] does not vary from Class 0 to Class I, unlike CO and H$_{2}$O. This is likely due to the ratio of atomic to molecular gas in the wind increasing as the source evolves, balancing out the decrease in mass accretion rate. Infall signatures are detected in HCO$^{+}$ and H$_{2}$O in a few sources.
  • One of the open questions in astrochemistry is how complex organic and prebiotic molecules are formed. Aims. Our aim is to start the process of compiling an inventory of oxygen-bearing complex organic molecules toward the solar-type Class 0 protostellar binary IRAS16293-2422 from an unbiased spectral survey with ALMA (PILS). Here we focus on the new detections of ethylene oxide (c-C$_2$H$_4$O), acetone (CH$_3$COCH$_3$), and propanal (C$_2$H$_5$CHO). Methods. With ALMA, we surveyed the spectral range from 329 to 363 GHz at 0.5$"$ (60 AU diameter) resolution. Using a simple model for the molecular emission in LTE, the excitation temperatures and column densities of each species were constrained. Results. We successfully detect propanal (44 lines), ethylene oxide (20 lines) and acetone (186 lines) toward one component of the protostellar binary, IRAS16293B. The high resolution maps demonstrate that the emission for all investigated species originates from the compact central region close to the protostar. This, along with a derived common excitation temperature of $\sim$ 125 K, is consistent with a coexistence of these molecules in the same gas. Conclusions. The observations mark the first detections of acetone, propanal and ethylene oxide toward a low-mass protostar. The relative abundance ratios of the two sets of isomers (CH$_3$COCH$_3$/C$_2$H$_5$CHO $\sim$ 8 and CH$_3$CHO/c-C$_2$H$_4$O $\sim$ 12) are comparable to previous observations toward high-mass protostars. The majority of observed abundance ratios from these results as well as those measured toward high-mass protostars are up to an order of magnitude above the predictions from chemical models. This may reflect either missing reactions or uncertain rates in the chemical networks. The physical conditions, such as temperatures or densities, used in the models, may not be applicable to solar-type protostars either.
  • How protostars accrete mass is one of the fundamental problems of star formation. High column densities and complex kinematical structures make direct observations challenging and they only provide a snapshot. Chemical tracers provide an interesting alternative to characterise the infall histories of protostars. Previous observations of H13CO+ towards the low-mass protostar IRAS15398-3359 showed a depression in the abundance. This is a sign of destruction of HCO+ by an enhanced presence of gaseous water in an extended region, possibly related to a recent burst in the accretion. Direct observations of water vapour can determine the exact extent of the emission and confirm the hypothesis that HCO+ is indeed a good tracer of the water snow-line. IRAS15398 was observed using ALMA at 0.5" resolution. Maps of HDO(101-000) and H218O(414-321) were taken simultaneously with observations of the CS(8-7) and N2H+(5-4) lines and continuum at 0.65 and 0.75 mm. The maps were interpreted using dust radiative transfer calculations of the protostellar infalling envelope with an outflow cavity. HDO is clearly detected and extended over the scales of the H13CO+ depression, although it is displaced by ~500 AU in the direction of the outflow. H218O is tentatively detected towards the red-shifted outflow lobe, but otherwise it is absent from the mapped region, which suggests that temperatures are low. Based on the temperature structure obtained from dust radiative transfer models, we conclude that the water was most likely released from the grains in an extended hour-glass configuration during a recent accretion burst. HDO is only detected in the region closest to the protostar, at distances of up to 500 AU. These signatures can only be explained if the luminosity has recently been increased by orders of magnitudes. Additionally, the densities in the outflow cones must be sufficiently low.
  • The inner regions of the envelopes surrounding young protostars are characterised by a complex chemistry, with prebiotic molecules present on the scales where protoplanetary disks eventually may form. This paper introduces a systematic survey, "Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS)" of the Class 0 protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422 using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The survey covers the full frequency range from 329 to 363 GHz (0.8 mm) with additional targeted observations at 3.0 and 1.3 mm. More than 10,000 features are detected toward one component in the protostellar binary. Glycolaldehyde, its isomers, methyl formate and acetic acid, and its reduced alcohol, ethylene glycol, are clearly detected. For ethylene glycol both lowest state conformers, aGg' and gGg', are detected, the latter for the first time in the ISM. The abundance of glycolaldehyde is comparable to or slightly larger than that of ethylene glycol. In comparison to the Galactic Center, these two species are over-abundant relative to methanol, possibly an indication of formation at low temperatures in CO-rich ices. Both 13C and deuterated isotopologues of glycolaldehyde are detected, also for the first time ever in the ISM. For the deuterated species, a D/H ratio of approximately 5% is found with no differences between the deuteration in the different functional groups of glycolaldehyde. Measurements of the 13C-species lead to a 12C:13C ratio of approximately 30, lower than the typical ISM value. This low ratio may reflect an enhancement of 13CO in the ice due to either ion-molecule reactions in the gas before freeze-out or differences in the temperatures where 12CO and 13CO ices sublimate. The results reinforce the importance of low-temperature grain surface chemistry for the formation of prebiotic molecules seen here in the gas after sublimation of the entire ice mantle.
  • Formamide (NH$_2$CHO) has previously been detected in several star-forming regions and is thought to be a precursor for different prebiotic molecules. Its formation mechanism is still debated, however. Observations of formamide, related species and their isopotologues may provide useful clues to the chemical pathways leading to their formation. The Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS) represents an unbiased high angular resolution and sensitivity spectral survey of the low-mass protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422 with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We detect for the first time the three singly deuterated forms of NH$_2$CHO (NH$_2$CDO, cis- and trans-NHDCHO) as well as DNCO towards the component B of this binary source. The images reveal that the different isotopologues are all present in the same region. Based on observations of the $^{13}$C isotopologues of formamide and a standard $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C ratio, the deuterium fractionation is found to be similar for the three different forms with a value of about 2%. The DNCO/HNCO ratio is also comparable to the D/H ratio of formamide ($\sim$1%). These results are in agreement with the hypothesis that NH$_2$CHO and HNCO are chemically related through grain surface formation.
  • (Abridged) The physical structure of deeply-embedded low-mass protostars (Class 0) on scales of less than 300 AU is still poorly constrained. Determining this is crucial for understanding the physical and chemical evolution from cores to disks. In this study two models of the emission, a Gaussian disk intensity distribution and a parametrized power-law disk model, are fitted to sub-arcsecond resolution interferometric continuum observations of five Class 0 sources, including one source with a confirmed Keplerian disk. For reference, a spherically symmetric single power-law envelope is fitted to the larger scale ($\sim$1000 AU) emission and investigated further for one of the sources on smaller scales. A thin disk model can approximate the emission and physical structure in the inner few 100 AU scales of the studied deeply-embedded low-mass protostars and paves the way for analysis of a larger sample with ALMA. While the disk radii agree with previous estimates the masses are different for some of the sources studied. Assuming a typical temperature distribution, the fractional amount of mass in the disk above 100 K varies in between 7% to 30%. Kinematic data are needed to determine the presence of any Keplerian disk. Using previous observations of p-H$_2^{18}$O, we estimate the relative gas phase water abundances roughly an order of magnitude higher than previously inferred when both warm and cold H$_2$ was used as reference. A spherically symmetric single power-law envelope model fails to simultaneously reproduce both the small and large scale emission.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the submillimeter dust continuum and H2D+ 1_{10}-1_{11} emission toward two evolved, potentially protostellar cores within the Ophiuchus molecular cloud, Oph A SM1 and SM1N. The data reveal small-scale condensations within both cores, with mass upper limits of M <~ 0.02M_Sun (~ 20 M_Jup). The SM1 condensation is consistent with a nearly-symmetric Gaussian source with a width of only 37 AU. The SM1N condensation is elongated, and extends 500 AU along its major axis. No evidence for substructure is seen in either source. A Jeans analysis indicates these sources are unlikely to fragment, suggesting that both will form single stars. H2D+ is only detected toward SM1N, offset from the continuum peak by ~150-200 AU. This offset may be due to either heating from an undetected, young, low luminosity protostellar source or first hydrostatic core, or HD (and consequently H2D+) depletion in the cold centre of the condensation. We propose that SM1 is protostellar, and that the condensation detected by ALMA is a warm (T ~ 30-50 K) accretion disk. The less concentrated emission of the SM1N condensation suggests that it is still starless, but we cannot rule out the presence of a low-luminosity source, perhaps surrounded by a pseudodisk. These data reveal observationally the earliest stages of the formation of circumstellar accretion regions, and agree with theoretical predictions that disk formation can occur very early in the star formation process, coeval with or just after the formation of a first hydrostatic core or protostar.
  • (Abridged) The water deuterium fractionation (HDO/H$_2$O abundance ratio) has traditionally been used to infer the amount of water brought to Earth by comets. Measuring this ratio in deeply-embedded low-mass protostars makes it possible to probe the critical stage when water is transported from clouds to disks in which icy bodies are formed. We present sub-arcsecond resolution observations of HDO in combination with H$_2^{18}$O from the PdBI toward the three low-mass protostars NGC 1333-IRAS 2A, IRAS 4A-NW, and IRAS 4B. The resulting HDO/H$_2$O ratio is $7.4\pm2.1\times10^{-4}$ for IRAS 2A, $19.1\pm5.4\times10^{-4}$ for IRAS 4A-NW, and $5.9\pm1.7\times10^{-4}$ for IRAS 4B. Derived ratios agree with radiative transfer models within a factor of 2-4 depending on the source. Our HDO/H$_2$O ratios for the inner regions (where $T>100$ K) of four young protostars are only a factor of 2 higher than those found for pristine, solar system comets. These small differences suggest that little processing of water occurs between the deeply embedded stage and the formation of planetesimals and comets.
  • The importance of the physical environment in the evolution of newly formed low-mass stars remains an open question. In particular, radiation from nearby more massive stars may affect both the physical and chemical structure of these kinds of young stars. Aims: To constrain the physical characteristics of a group of embedded low-mass protostars in Corona Australis in the vicinity of the young luminous Herbig Be star R CrA. Methods: Millimetre wavelength maps of molecular line and continuum emission towards the low-mass star forming region IRS7 near R CrA from the SMA and APEX are presented. The maps show the distribution of 18 lines from 7 species (H2CO, CH3OH, HC3N, c-C3H2, HCN, CN and SiO) on scales from 3" to 60" (400-8000 AU). Using a set of H2CO lines, we estimate the temperatures and column densities in the region using LTE and non-LTE methods. The results are compared with 1-D radiative transfer modelling of the protostellar cores. These models constrain which properties of the central source, envelope, and environment can give rise to the observed line and continuum emission. Results: Most of the H2CO emission from the regions emerges from two elongated narrow ridges dominating the emission picked up in both interferometric and single-dish measurements. The temperatures inferred from the H2CO lines are no less than ~30 K and more likely 50-60 K, and the line emission peaks are offset by ~2500 AU from the location of the embedded protostars. The temperatures can not be explained by the heating from the young stellar objects themselves. Irradiation by the nearby Herbig Be star R CrA could, however, explain the high temperatures. The elevated temperatures can in turn impact the physical and chemical characteristics of protostars and lead to enhanced abundances of typical tracers of photon dominated regions seen in single-dish line surveys of embedded protostars in the region.
  • We present a new publicly available tool (DustPol) aimed to model the polarised thermal dust emission. The module DustPol, which is publicly available, is part of the ARTIST (Adaptable Radiative Transfer Innovations for Submillimetre Telescopes) package, which also offers tools for modelling the polarisation of line emission together with a model library and a Python-based user interface. DustPol can easily manage analytical as well as pre-gridded models to generate synthetic maps of the Stokes I, Q, and U parameters. These maps are stored in FITS format which is straightforwardly read by the data reduction software used, e.g., by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). This turns DustPol into a powerful engine for the prediction of the expected polarisation features of a source observed with ALMA or the Planck satellite as well as for the interpretation of existing submillimetre observations obtained with other telescopes. DustPol allows the parameterisation of the maximum degree of polarisation and we find that, in a prestellar core, if there is depolarisation, this effect should happen at densities of 10^6 cm-3 or larger. We compare a model generated by DustPol with the observational polarisation data of the low-mass Class 0 object NGC 1333 IRAS 4A, finding that the total and the polarised emission are consistent.
  • Chamaeleon I is the most active region in terms of star formation in the Chamaeleon molecular cloud complex. Its population of prestellar and protostellar cores is not known and a controversy exists concerning its history of star formation. Our goal is to characterize the earliest stages of star formation in this cloud. We used the bolometer array LABOCA at APEX to map the cloud in dust continuum emission at 870 micron. The detected sources are analysed by carefully taking into account the spatial filtering inherent in the data reduction process. A search for associations with YSOs is performed using Spitzer data and the SIMBAD database. Most of the detected 870 micron emission is distributed in 5 filaments. We identify 59 starless cores, one candidate first hydrostatic core, and 21 sources associated with more evolved YSOs. The starless cores are only found above a visual extinction threshold of 5 mag. They are less dense than those detected in other nearby molecular clouds by a factor of a few on average. The core mass distribution is consistent with the IMF at the high-mass end but is overpopulated at the low-mass end. In addition, at most 17% of the cores have a mass larger than the critical Bonnor-Ebert mass. Both results suggest that a large fraction of the starless cores may not be prestellar. Based on the census of prestellar cores, Class 0 protostars, and more evolved YSOs, we conclude that the star formation rate has decreased with time in this cloud. The low fraction of candidate prestellar cores among the population of starless cores, the small number of Class 0 protostars, the high global star formation efficiency, the decrease of the star formation rate with time, and the low mass per unit length of the detected filaments all suggest that we may be witnessing the end of the star formation process in Cha I {abridged}.
  • We present far-infrared spectroscopic observations, taken with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) on the Herschel Space Observatory, of the protoplanetary disk around the pre-main-sequence star HD 100546. These observations are the first within the DIGIT Herschel key program, which aims to follow the evolution of dust, ice, and gas from young stellar objects still embedded in their parental molecular cloud core, through the final pre-main-sequence phases when the circumstellar disks are dissipated. Our aim is to improve the constraints on temperature and chemical composition of the crystalline olivines in the disk of HD 100546 and to give an inventory of the gas lines present in its far-infrared spectrum. The 69 \mu\m feature is analyzed in terms of position and shape to derive the dust temperature and composition. Furthermore, we detected 32 emission lines from five gaseous species and measured their line fluxes. The 69 \mu\m emission comes either from dust grains with ~70 K at radii larger than 50 AU, as suggested by blackbody fitting, or it arises from ~200 K dust at ~13 AU, close to the midplane, as supported by radiative transfer models. We also conclude that the forsterite crystals have few defects and contain at most a few percent iron by mass. Forbidden line emission from [CII] at 157 \mu\m and [OI] at 63 and 145 \mu\m, most likely due to photodissociation by stellar photons, is detected. Furthermore, five H2O and several OH lines are detected. We also found high-J rotational transition lines of CO, with rotational temperatures of ~300 K for the transitions up to J=22-21 and T~800 K for higher transitions.
  • Low-mass star formation is described by gravitational collapse of dense cores of gas and dust. At some point during the collapse, a disk is formed around the protostar and the disk will spin up and grow in size as the core contracts because of angular momentum conservation. The question is how early the disk formation process occurs. In this paper we aim to characterize the kinematical state of a deeply embedded, Class 0 young stellar object, NGC1333-IRAS2A, based on high angular resolution (< 1$''$ $\approx$ 200 AU) interferometric observations of HCN and H$^{13}$CN J = 4-3 from the Submillimeter Array, and test whether a circumstellar disk can be detected based on gas kinematic features. We adopt a physical model which has been shown to describe the object well and obtain a fit of a parameterized model of the velocity field, using a two-dimensional axis-symmetric radiation transfer code. The parameterization and fit to the high angular resolution data characterize the central dynamical mass and the ratio of infall velocity to rotation velocity. We find a large amount of infall and very little rotation on all scales. The central object has a relatively low mass of 0.25 M$_\odot$ . As an object with a low stellar mass compared to the envelope mass, we conclude that NGC1333-IRAS2A is consistent with the suggestion that, as a Class 0 object, it represents the earliest stages of star formation. The large amount of infall relative to rotation also suggests that this is a young object. We do however find the need of a central compact component on scales of a few hundred AU based on the continuum data, which suggests that disk formation happens shortly after the initial gravitational collapse. The data do not reveal a distinct velocity field for this 0.1 M$_\odot$ component.
  • We report the discovery of a nearby, embedded cluster of young stellar objects, associated filamentary infrared dark cloud, and 4.5 micron shock emission knots from outflows detected in Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared imaging of the Serpens-Aquila Rift obtained as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We also present radial velocity measurements of the region from molecular line observations obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) that suggest the cluster is co-moving with the Serpens Main embedded cluster 3 degrees to the north. We therefore assign it the same distance, 260 pc. The core of the new cluster, which we call Serpens South, is composed of an unusually large fraction of protostars (77%) at high mean surface density (>430 pc^-2) and short median nearest neighbor spacing (3700 AU). We perform basic cluster structure characterization using nearest neighbor surface density mapping of the YSOs and compare our findings to other known clusters with equivalent analyses available in the literature.