• Based on phase-resolved broadband spectroscopy using $XMM$-$Newton$ and $NuSTAR$, we report on a potential cyclotron resonant scattering feature at $E \sim 13$ keV in the pulsed spectrum of the recently discoverd ULX pulsar NGC 300 ULX1. If this interpretation is correct, the implied magnetic field of the central neutron star is $B \sim 10^{12}$ G (assuming scattering off electrons), similar to that estimated from the observed spin-up of the star, and also similar to known Galactic X-ray pulsars. We discuss the implications of this result for the connection between NGC 300 ULX1 and the other known ULX pulsars, particularly in light of the recent discovery of a likely proton Cyclotron line in another ULX, M51 ULX-8.
  • Swift monitoring of NGC 4151 with ~6 hr sampling over a total of 69 days in early 2016 is used to construct light curves covering five bands in the X-rays (0.3-50 keV) and six in the ultraviolet (UV)/optical (1900-5500 A). The three hardest X-ray bands (>2.5 keV) are all strongly correlated with no measurable interband lag while the two softer bands show lower variability and weaker correlations. The UV/optical bands are significantly correlated with the X-rays, lagging ~3-4 days behind the hard X-rays. The variability within the UV/optical bands is also strongly correlated, with the UV appearing to lead the optical by ~0.5-1 day. This combination of >~3 day lags between the X-rays and UV and <~1 day lags within the UV/optical appears to rule out the "lamp-post" reprocessing model in which a hot, X-ray emitting corona directly illuminates the accretion disk, which then reprocesses the energy in the UV/optical. Instead, these results appear consistent with the Gardner & Done picture in which two separate reprocessings occur: first, emission from the corona illuminates an extreme-UV-emitting toroidal component that shields the disk from the corona; this then heats the extreme-UV component which illuminates the disk and drives its variability.
  • We report the identification of a bright hard X-ray source dominating the M31 bulge above 25 keV from a simultaneous NuSTAR-Swift observation. We find that this source is the counterpart to Swift J0042.6+4112, which was previously detected in the Swift BAT All-sky Hard X-ray Survey. This Swift BAT source had been suggested to be the combined emission from a number of point sources; our new observations have identified a single X-ray source from 0.5 to 50 keV as the counterpart for the first time. In the 0.5-10 keV band, the source had been classified as an X-ray binary candidate in various Chandra and XMM studies; however, since it was not clearly associated with Swift J0042.6+4112, the previous E < 10 keV observations did not generate much attention. This source has a spectrum with a soft X-ray excess (kT~ 0.2 keV) plus a hard spectrum with a power law of Gamma ~ 1 and a cutoff around 15-20 keV, typical of the spectral characteristics of accreting pulsars. Unfortunately, any potential pulsation was undetected in the NuSTAR data, possibly due to insufficient photon statistics. The existing deep HST images exclude high-mass (>3 Msun) donors at the location of this source. The best interpretation for the nature of this source is an X-ray pulsar with an intermediate-mass (<3 Msun) companion or a symbiotic X-ray binary. We discuss other possibilities in more detail.
  • S. Adrian-Martinez, M. Ageron, A. Albert, I. Al Samarai, M. Andre, G. Anton, M. Ardid, J.-J. Aubert, B. Baret, J. Barrios-Marti, S. Basa, V. Bertin, S. Biagi, C. Bogazzi, R. Bormuth, M. Bou-Cabo, M.C. Bouwhuis, R. Bruijn, J. Brunner, J. Busto, A. Capone, L. Caramete, J. Carr, T. Chiarusi, M. Circella, R. Coniglione, H. Costantini, P. Coyle, A. Creusot, I. Dekeyser, A. Deschamps, G. De Bonis, C. Distefano, C. Donzaud, D. Dornic, D. Drouhin, A. Dumas, T. Eberl, D. Elsasser, A. Enzenhofer, K. Fehn, I. Felis, P. Fermani, F. Folger, L.A. Fusco, S. Galata, P. Gay, S. Geißelsoder, K. Geyer, V. Giordano, A. Gleixner, R. Gracia-Ruiz, K. Graf, H. van Haren, A.J. Heijboer, Y. Hello, J.J. Hernandez-Rey, A. Herrero, J. Hoßl, J. Hofestadt, C. Hugon, C.W James, M. de Jong, M. Kadler, O. Kalekin, U. Katz, D. Kießling, P. Kooijman, A. Kouchner, I. Kreykenbohm, V. Kulikovskiy, R. Lahmann, G. Lambard, D. Lattuada, D. Lefevre, E. Leonora, S. Loucatos, S. Mangano, M. Marcelin, A. Margiotta, J.A. Martinez-Mora, S. Martini, A. Mathieu, T. Michael, P. Migliozzi, A. Moussa, C. Mueller, M. Neff, E. Nezri, G.E. Pavalas, C. Pellegrino, C. Perrina, P. Piattelli, V. Popa, T. Pradier, C. Racca, G. Riccobene, R. Richter, K. Roensch, A. Rostovtsev, M. Saldana, D. F. E. Samtleben, M. Sanguineti, P. Sapienza, J. Schmid, J. Schnabel, S. Schulte, F. Schüssler, T. Seitz, C. Sieger, M. Spurio, J.J.M. Steijger, Th. Stolarczyk, A. Sanchez-Losa, M. Taiuti, C. Tamburini, A. Trovato, M. Tselengidou, C. Tonnis, D. Turpin, B. Vallage, C. Vallee, V. Van Elewyck, M. Vecchi, E. Visser, D. Vivolo, S. Wagner, J. Wilms, J.D. Zornoza, J. Zuniga, A. Klotz, M. Boer, A. Le Van Suu, C. Akerlof, W. Zheng, P. Evans, N. Gehrels, J. Kennea, J.P. Osborne, D.M. Coward
    Aug. 5, 2015 astro-ph.HE
    High-energy neutrinos could be produced in the interaction of charged cosmic rays with matter or radiation surrounding astrophysical sources. Even with the recent detection of extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube experiment, no astrophysical neutrino source has yet been discovered. Transient sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, or active galactic nuclei are promising candidates. Multi-messenger programs offer a unique opportunity to detect these transient sources. By combining the information provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope with information coming from other observatories, the probability of detecting a source is enhanced, allowing the possibility of identifying a neutrino progenitor from a single detected event. A method based on optical and X-ray follow-ups of high-energy neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT and ROTSE) and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection, and is therefore well-suited to search for fast transient sources. To identify an optical or X-ray counterpart to a neutrino signal, the images provided by the follow-up observations are analysed with dedicated pipelines. A total of 42 alerts with optical and 7 alerts with X-ray images taken with a maximum delay of 24 hours after the neutrino trigger have been analysed. No optical or X-ray counterparts associated to the neutrino triggers have been found, and upper limits on transient source magnitudes have been derived. The probability to reject the gamma-ray burst origin hypothesis has been computed for each alert.
  • In 2006 February, shortly after its launch, Swift began monitoring the center of the Milky Way with the onboard X-Ray Telescope using short 1-ks exposures performed every 1-4 days. Between 2006 and 2014, over 1200 observations have been obtained, amounting to ~1.2 Ms of exposure time. This has yielded a wealth of information about the long-term X-ray behavior of the supermassive black hole Sgr A*, and numerous transient X-ray binaries that are located within the 25'x25' region covered by the campaign. In this review we highlight the discoveries made during these first nine years, which includes 1) the detection of seven bright X-ray flares from Sgr A*, 2) the discovery of the magnetar SGR J1745-29, 3) the first systematic analysis of the outburst light curves and energetics of the peculiar class of very-faint X-ray binaries, 4) the discovery of three new transient X-ray sources, 5) exposing low-level accretion in otherwise bright X-ray binaries, and 6) the identification of a candidate X-ray binary/millisecond radio pulsar transitional object. We also reflect on future science to be done by continuing this Swift's legacy campaign of the Galactic center, which includes high-cadence monitoring of how the interaction between the gaseous object `G2' and Sgr A* plays out in the future.
  • The recent discovery of a milli-second radio pulsar experiencing an accretion outburst similar to those seen in low mass X-ray binaries, has opened up a new opportunity to investigate the evolutionary link between these two different neutron star manifestations. The remarkable X-ray variability and hard X-ray spectrum of this object can potentially serve as a template to search for other X-ray binary/radio pulsar transitional objects. Here we demonstrate that the transient X-ray source XMM J174457-2850.3 near the Galactic center displays similar X-ray properties. We report on the detection of an energetic thermonuclear burst with an estimated duration of ~2 hr and a radiated energy output of ~5E40 erg, which unambiguously demonstrates that the source harbors an accreting neutron star. It has a quiescent X-ray luminosity of Lx~5E32 erg/s and exhibits occasional accretion outbursts during which it brightens to Lx~1E35-1E36 erg/s for a few weeks (2-10 keV). However, the source often lingers in between outburst and quiescence at Lx~1E33-1E34 erg/s. This unusual X-ray flux behavior and its relatively hard X-ray spectrum, a power law with an index of ~1.4, could possibly be explained in terms of the interaction between the accretion flow and the magnetic field of the neutron star.
  • AX J1745.6-2901 and GRS 1741-2853 are two transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries that are located within ~10' from the Galactic center. Multi-year monitoring observations with the Swift/XRT has exposed several accretion outbursts from these objects. We report on their updated X-ray light curves and renewed activity that occurred in 2010-2013.
  • Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars, and are typically found in the distant Universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity ($L\sim 3 \times 10^{53}$ erg s$^{-1}$) and its relative proximity ($z=0.34$), GRB 130427A was a unique event that reached the highest fluence observed in the gamma-ray band. Here we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-m Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early Universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.
  • Starting in 2006, Swift has been targeting a region of ~21'X21' around Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) with the onboard X-ray telescope. The short, quasi-daily observations offer an unique view of the long-term X-ray behavior of the supermassive black hole. We report on the data obtained between 2006 February and 2011 October, which encompasses 715 observations with a total accumulated exposure time of ~0.8 Ms. A total of six X-ray flares were detected with Swift, which all had an average 2-10 keV luminosity of Lx (1-4)E35 erg/s (assuming a distance of 8 kpc). This more than doubles the number of such bright X-ray flares observed from Sgr A*. One of the Swift-detected flares may have been softer than the other five, which would indicate that flares of similar intensity can have different spectral properties. The Swift campaign allows us to constrain the occurrence rate of bright (Lx > 1E35 erg/s) X-ray flares to be ~0.1-0.2 per day, which is in line with previous estimates. This analysis of the occurrence rate and properties of the X-ray flares seen with Swift offers an important calibration point to asses whether the flaring behavior of Sgr A* changes as a result of its interaction with the gas cloud that is projected to make a close passage in 2013.
  • Swift is a multi-wavelength observatory specifically designed for gamma-ray burst (GRB) astronomy that is operational since 2004. Swift is also a very flexible multi-purpose facility that supports a wide range of scientific fields such as active galactic nuclei, supernovae, cataclysmic variables, Galactic transients, active stars and comets. The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) has collected more than 150 Ms of observations in its first seven years of operations. We present the list of all the X-ray point sources detected in XRT imaging data taken in photon counting mode during the first seven years of Swift operations. All these point-like sources, excluding the Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB), will be stored in a catalog publicly available (1SWXRT). We consider all XRT observations with exposure time > 500 s taken in the period 2005-2011. Data were reduced and analyzed with standard techniques and a list of detected sources for each observation was produced. A careful visual inspection was performed to remove extended, spurious and piled-up sources. Positions, count rates, fluxes and the corresponding uncertainties were computed. We have analyzed more than 35,000 XRT fields, with exposures ranging between 500 s and 100 ks, for a total exposure time of 140 Ms. The catalog includes ~ 89,000 entries, of which almost 85,000 are not affected by pile-up and are not GRBs. Since many XRT fields were observed several times, we have a total of ~36,000 distinct celestial sources. We computed count rates in three energy bands: 0.3-10 keV (Full, or F), 0.3-3 keV (Soft, or S) and 2-10 keV (Hard, or H). Each entry has a detection in at least one of these bands. In particular, we detect ~ 80,000, ~ 70,000 and ~ 25,500$ in the F, S and H band, respectively. Count rates were converted into fluxes in the 0.5-10, 0.5-2 and 2-10 keV bands. Some possible scientific uses of the catalog are also highlighted.
  • We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of Swift X-ray light-curves of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) collecting data from more than 650 GRBs discovered by Swift and other facilities. The unprecedented sample size allows us to constrain the REST FRAME X-ray properties of GRBs from a statistical perspective, with particular reference to intrinsic time scales and the energetics of the different light-curve phases in a common rest-frame 0.3-30 keV energy band. Temporal variability episodes are also studied and their properties constrained. Two fundamental questions drive this effort: i) Does the X-ray emission retain any kind of "memory"of the prompt gamma-ray phase? ii) Where is the dividing line between long and short GRB X-ray properties? We show that short GRBs decay faster, are less luminous and less energetic than long GRBs in the X-rays, but are interestingly characterized by similar intrinsic absorption. We furthermore reveal the existence of a number of statistically significant relations that link the X-ray to prompt gamma-ray parameters in long GRBs; short GRBs are outliers of the majority of these 2-parameter relations. However and more importantly, we report on the existence of a universal 3-parameter scaling that links the X-ray and the gamma-ray energy to the prompt spectral peak energy of BOTH long and short GRBs: E_{X,iso}\propto E_{gamma,iso}^{1.00\pm 0.06}/E_{pk}^{0.60\pm 0.10}.
  • We present Swift follow-up observations of a sample of 35 unclassified faint X-ray sources drawn from the ASCA Galactic centre and plane surveys. Our short pointed XRT observations allow detections down to a limiting 0.3-10 keV flux of ~1E-13 erg cm-2 s-1, which translates into a luminosity of ~1E33 erg s-1 for an assumed distance of D=8 kpc. The brightest source in our sample reaches a maximum 0.3-10 keV luminosity of ~2E36 (D/8kpc)^2 erg s-1 during our observations. We detect 16 (46%) of the ASCA sources with the XRT, while 19 were not detected during our program. Since we are probing the faint end of the ASCA source populations, we expect a large fraction of the non-detections to be due to the Eddington bias. This is strengthened by the fact that we find the observed XRT count rates to be predominantly lower than expected based on the reported ASCA intensities. Investigation of the ASCA properties and long-term X-ray variability leads us to conclude that the non-detections likely include two spurious ASCA detections and three objects that are variable or transient X-ray sources. For the 16 XRT-detected sources we obtain positional accuracies of ~2-4", which significantly improves upon their ASCA uncertainties of ~1'. We use the X-ray spectra and variability to characterise these objects. Most appear to be faint, persistent X-ray emitters that have highly absorbed spectra. Based on their X-ray properties we identify three accreting compact objects: one confirmed (AX J1754.2-2754) and one candidate (AX J1538.3-5541) X-ray binary, and one possible magnetically accreting white dwarf (AX J1620.1-5002). Furthermore, we use the improved positions of XRT-detected sources to search for counterparts in simultaneously obtained Swift/UVOT images and possible associations with cataloged sources at various wavelengths. This reveals three possible main sequence stars amongst our sample.
  • We present the catalog of sources detected in the first 22 months of data from the hard X-ray survey (14--195 keV) conducted with the BAT coded mask imager on the \swift satellite. The catalog contains 461 sources detected above the 4.8 sigma level with BAT. High angular resolution X-ray data for every source from Swift XRT or archival data have allowed associations to be made with known counterparts in other wavelength bands for over 97% of the detections, including the discovery of ~30 galaxies previously unknown as AGN and several new Galactic sources. A total of 266 of the sources are associated with Seyfert galaxies (median redshift z ~ 0.03) or blazars, with the majority of the remaining sources associated with X-ray binaries in our Galaxy. This ongoing survey is the first uniform all sky hard X-ray survey since HEAO-1 in 1977. Since the publication of the 9-month BAT survey we have increased the number of energy channels from 4 to 8 and have substantially increased the number of sources with accurate average spectra. The BAT 22-month catalog is the product of the most sensitive all-sky survey in the hard X-ray band, with a detection sensitivity (4.8 sigma) of 2.2e-11 erg/cm2/s (1 mCrab) over most of the sky in the 14--195 keV band.
  • It is thought that the first generations of massive stars in the Universe were an important, and quite possibly dominant, source of the ultra-violet radiation that reionized the hydrogen gas in the intergalactic medium (IGM); a state in which it has remained to the present day. Measurements of cosmic microwave background anisotropies suggest that this phase-change largely took place in the redshift range z=10.8 +/- 1.4, while observations of quasars and Lyman-alpha galaxies have shown that the process was essentially completed by z=6. However, the detailed history of reionization, and characteristics of the stars and proto-galaxies that drove it, remain unknown. Further progress in understanding requires direct observations of the sources of ultra-violet radiation in the era of reionization, and mapping the evolution of the neutral hydrogen fraction through time. The detection of galaxies at such redshifts is highly challenging, due to their intrinsic faintness and high luminosity distance, whilst bright quasars appear to be rare beyond z~7. Here we report the discovery of a gamma-ray burst, GRB 090423, at redshift z=8.26 -0.08 +0.07. This is well beyond the redshift of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxy (z=6.96) and quasar (z=6.43). It establishes that massive stars were being produced, and dying as GRBs, ~625 million years after the Big Bang. In addition, the accurate position of the burst pinpoints the location of the most distant galaxy known to date. Larger samples of GRBs beyond z~7 will constrain the evolving rate of star formation in the early universe, while rapid spectroscopy of their afterglows will allow direct exploration of the progress of reionization with cosmic time.
  • We present a new measurement of the cosmic X-ray background (CXRB) in the 1.5-7 keV energy band, performed by exploiting the Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) data archive. We also present a CXRB spectral model in a wider energy band (1.5-200 keV), obtained by combining these data with the recently published Swift-BAT measurement. From the XRT archive we collect a complete sample of 126 high Galactic latitude gamma-ray burst (GRB) follow-up observations. This provides a total exposure of 7.5 Ms and a sky-coverage of 7 square degrees which represents a serendipitous survey, well suited for a direct measurement of the CXRB in the 1.5-10 keV interval. Our work is based on a complete characterization of the instrumental background and an accurate measurement of the stray-light contamination and vignetting calibration. We find that the CXRB spectrum in the 1.5-7 keV energy band can be equally well fitted by a single power-law with photon index Gamma=1.47+/-0.07 or a single power-law with photon index Gamma=1.41+/-0.06 and an exponential roll-off at 41 keV. The measured flux in the 2-10 keV energy band is 2.18+/-0.13 E-11 erg/(cm2 s deg2) in the 2-10 keV band. Combining Swift-XRT with Swift-BAT (15-200 keV) we find that, in the 1.5-200 keV band, the CXRB spectrum can be well described by two smoothly-joined power laws with the energy break at 29.0+/-0.5 keV corresponding to a nu F_nu peak located at 22.4+/-0.4 keV. Taking advantage of both the Swift high energy instruments (XRT and BAT), we produce an analytical description of the CXRB spectrum over a wide (1.5-200 keV) energy band. This model is marginally consistent with the HEAO1 measurement (~10% higher at energies higher than 20 keV, while it is significantly (30%) higher at low energies (2-10 keV).
  • IGR J17091-3624 and IGR J17098-3628 are two X-ray transients discovered by INTEGRAL and classified as possible black hole candidates (BHCs). We present here the results obtained from the analysis of multi-wavelength data sets collected by different instruments from 2005 until the end of 2007 on both sources. IGR J17098-3628 has been regularly detected by INTEGRAL and RXTE over the entire period of the observational campaign; it was also observed with pointed observations by XMM and Swift/XRT in 2005 and 2006 and exhibited flux variations not linked with the change of any particular spectral features. IGR J17091-3624 was initially in quiescence (after a period of activity between 2003 April and 2004 April) and it was then detected again in outburst in the XRT field of view during a Swift observation of IGR J17098--3628 on 2007 July 9. The observations during quiescence provide an upper limit to the 0.2-10 keV luminosity, while the observations in outburst cover the transition from the hard to the soft state. Moreover, we obtain a refined X-ray position for IGR J17091-3624 from the Swift/XRT observations during the outburst in 2007. The new position is inconsistent with the previously proposed radio counterpart. We identify in VLA archive data a compact radio source consistent with the new X-ray position and propose it as the radio counterpart of the X-ray transient.
  • Prior to the launch of the Swift mission several X-ray line detections were reported in Gamma Ray Burst afterglow spectra. To date, these pre-Swift era results have not been conclusively confirmed. The most contentious issue in this area is the choice of statistical method used to evaluate the significance of these features. In this paper we compare three different methods already extant in the literature for assessing the significance of possible line features and discuss their relative advantages and disadvantages. The methods are demonstrated by application to observations of 40 bursts from the archive of Swift XRT at early times (< few ks post trigger in the rest frame of the burst). Based on this thorough analysis we found no strong evidence for emission lines. For each of the three methods we have determined detection limits for emission line strengths in bursts with spectral parameters typical of the Swift-era sample. We also discuss the effects of the current calibration status on emission line detection.
  • The Swift X-ray Telescope focal plane camera is a front-illuminated MOS CCD, providing a spectral response kernel of 135 eV FWHM at 5.9 keV as measured before launch. We describe the CCD calibration program based on celestial and on-board calibration sources, relevant in-flight experiences, and developments in the CCD response model. We illustrate how the revised response model describes the calibration sources well. Comparison of observed spectra with models folded through the instrument response produces negative residuals around and below the Oxygen edge. We discuss several possible causes for such residuals. Traps created by proton damage on the CCD increase the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) over time. We describe the evolution of the CTI since the launch and its effect on the CCD spectral resolution and the gain.
  • Almost the totality of the bright foreground sources in the WMAP CMB maps are blazars, a class of sources that show usually also X-ray emission. However, 23 objects in a flux-limited sample of 140 blazars of the WMAP catalog (first year) were never reported before as X-ray sources. We present here the results of 41 Swift observations which led to the detection of all these 23 blazars in the 0.3-10 keV band. We conclude that all micro-wave selected blazars are X-ray emitters and that the distribution of the micro-wave to X-ray spectral slope $\alpha_{mu x}$ of LBL blazars is very narrow, confirming that the X-ray flux of most blazars is a very good estimator of their micro-wave emission. The X-ray spectral shape of all the objects that were observed long enough to allow spectral analysis is flat and consistent with inverse Compton emission within the commonly accepted view where the radiation from blazars is emitted in a Sychrotron-Inverse-Compton scenario. We predict that all blazars and most radio galaxies above the sensitivity limit of the WMAP and of the Planck CMB missions are X-ray sources detectable by the present generation of X-ray satellites. An hypothetical all-sky soft X-ray survey with sensitivity of approximately $10^{-15}$ erg/s would be crucial to locate and remove over 100,000 blazars from CMB temperature and polarization maps and therefore accurately clean the primordial CMB signal from the largest population of extragalactic foreground contaminants.
  • We present the results of a series of Swift and quasi simultaneous ground-based infra-red observations of the blazar 3C 454.3 carried out in April-May 2005 when the source was 10 to 30 times brighter than previously observed. We found 3C 454.3 to be very bright and variable at all frequencies covered by our instrumentation. The broad-band Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) shows the usual two-bump shape (in nu-nu f(nu) space) with the Infra-red, optical and UV data sampling the declining part of the synchrotron emission that, even during this extremely large outburst, had its maximum in the far-infrared. The X-ray spectral data from the XRT and BAT instruments are flat and due to inverse Compton emission. The remarkable SED observed implies that at the time of the Swift pointings 3C 454.3 was one of the brightest objects in the extragalactic sky with a gamma-ray emission similar or brighter than that of 3C 279 when observed in a high state by EGRET. Time variability in the optical-UV flux is very different from that in the X-ray data: while the first component varied by about a factor two within a single exposure, but remained approximately constant between different observations, the inverse Compton component did not vary on short time-scales but changed by more than a factor of 3 between observations separated by a few days. This different dynamical behaviour illustrates the need to collect simultaneous multi-frequency data over a wide range of time-scales to fully constrain physical parameters in blazars.
  • We present the X-ray spectra of 86 optically-identified sources in the 13H XMM-Newton/Chandra deep field which have >70 X-ray counts. The sample consists of 50 broad line AGN, 25 narrow emission line galaxies, 6 absorption line galaxies, and 5 Galactic stars. The majority (42/50) of the broad line AGN have X-ray spectra which are consistent with a power law shape. They have a mean photon index of Gamma = 2.0 +- 0.1 and an intrinsic dispersion sigma = 0.4 +- 0.1. Five BLAGN show a deficit of soft X-rays, indicating absorption. Significant absorption is more common in the narrow emission line galaxies (13/25) and absorption line galaxies (2/6) than in the broad line AGN (5/50), but is not universal in any of these classes of object. The majority of the 20 absorbed sources have X-ray spectra consistent with a simple cold photoelectric absorber, but 6/20 require more complex models with either an additional component of soft X-ray emitting plasma, or an ionised absorber. Of the 16 galaxies which do not show evidence for X-ray absorption, only 2 objects are likely to be powered by star formation, and both have 2-10 keV X-ray luminosities of <= 10^40 cgs. The X-ray emission in the other 14 unabsorbed NELGs and galaxies is most likely powered by AGN, which are not detected in the optical because they are outshone by their luminous host galaxies. The Galactic stars show multi-temperature thermal spectra which peak between 0.5 and 1 keV. Star/AGN discrimination is possible for 4 of the 5 stars solely from their X-ray spectra.
  • We present a catalogue of refined positions of 68 gamma ray burst (GRB) afterglows observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) from the launch up to 2005 Oct 16. This is a result of the refinement of the XRT boresight calibration. We tested this correction by means of a systematic study of a large sample of X-ray sources observed by XRT with well established optical counterparts. We found that we can reduce the systematic error radius of the measurements by a factor of two, from 6.5" to 3.2" (90% of confidence). We corrected all the positions of the afterglows observed by XRT in the first 11 months of the Swift mission. This is particularly important for the 37 X-ray afterglows without optical counterpart. Optical follow-up of dark GRBs, in fact, will be more efficient with the use of the more accurate XRT positions.
  • The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) focal plane camera is a front-illuminated MOS CCD, providing a spectral response kernel of 144 eV FWHM at 6.5 keV. We describe the CCD calibration program based on celestial and on-board calibration sources, relevant in-flight experiences, and developments in the CCD response model. We illustrate how the revised response model describes the calibration sources well. Loss of temperature control motivated a laboratory program to re-optimize the CCD substrate voltage, we describe the small changes in the CCD response that would result from use of a substrate voltage of 6V.
  • The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer performed its first autonomous, X-ray follow-up to a newly detected GRB on 2005 January 17, within 193 seconds of the burst trigger by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. While the burst was still in progress, the X-ray Telescope obtained a position and an image for an un-catalogued X-ray source; simultaneous with the gamma-ray observation. The XRT observed flux during the prompt emission was 1.1 x 10^{-8} ergs cm^{-2} s^{-1} in the 0.5-10 keV energy band. The emission in the X-ray band decreased by three orders of magnitude within 700 seconds, following the prompt emission. This is found to be consistent with the gamma-ray decay when extrapolated into the XRT energy band. During the following 6.3 hours, the XRT observed the afterglow in an automated sequence for an additional 947 seconds, until the burst became fully obscured by the Earth limb. A faint, extremely slowly decaying afterglow, alpha=-0.21$, was detected. Finally, a break in the lightcurve occurred and the flux decayed with alpha<-1.2$. The X-ray position triggered many follow-up observations: no optical afterglow could be confirmed, although a candidate was identified 3 arcsecs from the XRT position.
  • We present high-resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations of M87 with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers on XMM-Newton. We detect strong K-shell line emission from N, O, Ne, Mg, some emission from He-like Si, a fully resolved set of Fe L-shell emission spectra, and some emission from C. The angular intensity distributions of the strong emission lines are detectably resolved on scales (15-160) arcsec. The gas in the inner arcmin of M87 has a multi-phase structure, as indicated by the similarity of the emission line profiles of Fe L shell ions with widely separated ionization potentials. The global Fe L spectrum is approximately consistent with an isothermal plasma at kT_e ~ 1.8 keV, in addition to a component with a temperature distribution appropriate to an isobaric cooling flow, but with a minimum temperature cutoff of kT_min ~ 600 eV. The behaviour of this cooling-flow component is qualitatively similar to what is seen in other cooling flow clusters. Finally, we do not find any strong evidence for a spatial variation in abundances due to resonance scattering redistribution in the inner arcminute of the core.