• Context: Post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) binaries are surrounded by stable dusty and gaseous disks similar to the ones around young stellar objects. Whereas significant effort is spent on modeling observations of disks around young stellar objects, the disks around post-AGB binaries receive significantly less attention, even though they pose significant constraints on theories of disk physics and binary evolution. Aims: We want to examine the structure of and phenomena at play in circumbinary disks around post-AGB stars. We continue the analysis of our near-infrared interferometric image of the inner rim of the circumbinary disk around IRAS08544-4431. We want to understand the physics governing this inner disk rim. Methods: We use a radiative transfer model of a dusty disk to reproduce simultaneously the photometry as well as the near-infrared interferometric dataset on IRAS08544-4431. The model assumes hydrostatic equilibrium and takes dust settling self-consistently into account. Results: The best-fit radiative transfer model shows excellent agreement with the spectral energy distribution up to mm wavelengths as well as with the PIONIER visibility data. It requires a rounded inner rim structure, starting at a radius of 8.25 au. However, the model does not fully reproduce the detected over-resolved flux nor the azimuthal flux distribution of the inner rim. While the asymmetric inner disk rim structure is likely to be the consequence of disk-binary interactions, the origin of the additional over-resolved flux remains unclear. Conclusions: As in young stellar objects, the disk inner rim of IRAS08544-4431 is ruled by dust sublimation physics. Additional observations are needed to understand the origin of the extended flux and the azimuthal perturbation at the inner rim of the disk.
  • To understand the chemical composition of planets, it is important to know the chemical composition of the region where they form in protoplanetary disks. Due to its fundamental role in chemical and biological processes, carbon is a key element to trace. We aim to identify the carriers and processes behind the extended NIR flux observed around several Herbig stars. We compare the extended NIR flux from objects in the PIONIER Herbig Ae/Be survey with their flux in the PAH features. HD 100453 is used as a benchmark case to investigate the influence of quantum heated particles, like PAHs or very small carbonaceous grains, in more detail. We use the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code MCMax to do a parameter study of the QHP size and scale- height and examine the influence of quantum heating on the amount of extended flux in the NIR visibilities. There is a correlation between the PAH feature flux of a disk and the amount of its extended NIR flux. We find that very small carbonaceous grains create the observed extended NIR flux around HD 100453 and still lead to a realistic SED. These results can not be achieved without using quantum heating effects, e.g. only with scattered light and grains in thermal equilibrium. It is possible to explain the extended NIR emission around Herbig stars with the presence of carbonaceous, quantum heated particles. Interferometric observations can be used to constrain the spatial distribution and typical size of carbonaceous material in the terrestrial planet forming region.
  • Circumstellar disks around young stars are the birthsites of planets. It is thus fundamental to study the disks in which they form, their structure and the physical conditions therein. The first astronomical unit is of great interest because this is where the terrestrial-planets form and the angular momentum is controled via massloss through winds/jets. With its milli-arcsecond resolution, optical interferometry is the only technic able to spatially resolve the first few astronomical units of the disk. In this review, we will present a broad overview of studies of young stellar objects with interferometry, and discuss prospects for the future.
  • Transitional discs are a class of circumstellar discs around young stars with extensive clearing of dusty material within their inner regions on 10s of au scales. One of the primary candidates for this kind of clearing is the formation of planet(s) within the disc that then accrete or clear their immediate area as they migrate through the disc. Our sample included eight transitional discs. Using the Keck/NIRC2 instrument we utilised the Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM) interferometry technique to search for asymmetries indicative of ongoing planet formation. We searched for close-in companions using both model fitting and interferometric image reconstruction techniques. Using simulated data, we derived diagnostics that helped us to distinguish between point sources and extended asymmetric disc emission. In addition, we investigated the degeneracy between the contrast and separation that appear for marginally resolved companions. We found FP Tau to contain a previously unseen disc wall, and DM Tau, LkHa 330, and TW Hya to contain an asymmetric signal indicative of point source-like emission. We placed upper limits on the contrast of a companion in RXJ1842.9-3532 and V2246 Oph. We ruled the asymmetry signal in RXJ1615.3-3255 and V2062 Oph to be false positives. In the cases where our data indicated a potential companion we computed estimates for the value of $M_c \dot M_c$ and found values in the range of $10^{-5} - 10^{-3} M^2_J yr^{-1}$. We found significant asymmetries in four targets. Of these, three were consistent with companions. We resolved a previously unseen gap in the disc of FP Tau extending inwards from approximately 10 au.
  • MWC158 is a star with the B[e] phenomenon that shows strong spectrophotometric variability (in lines and in UV and visible continuum) attributed to phases of shell ejection. The evolutionary stage of this star was never clearly determined. Previous interferometric, spectropolarimetric and spectro-interferometric studies suggest a disk morphology for its environment. We investigate the origin of the variability within the inner astronomical unit of the central star using near-infrared interferometric observations with PIONIER at the VLTI over a two-year period. We performed an image reconstruction of the circumstellar environment using the SPARCO method. We discovered that the morphology of the circumstellar environment could vary on timescales of weeks or days. We carried out a parametric fit of the data with a model consisting of a star, a disk and a bright spot that represents a brighter emission in the disk. We detect strong morphological changes in the first astronomical unit around the star, that happen on a timescale of few months. We cannot account for such variability well with a binary model. Our parametric model fits the data well and allows us to extract the location of the asymmetry for different epochs. For the first time, we detect a morphological variability in the environment of MWC158. This variability is reproduced by a model of a disk and a bright spot. The locations of the bright spot suggest that it is located in the disk, but its precise motion is not determined. The origin of the asymmetry in the disk is complex and may be related to asymmetric shell ejections.
  • We present the first near-IR milli-arcsecond-scale image of a post-AGB binary that is surrounded by hot circumbinary dust. A very rich interferometric data set in six spectral channels was acquired of IRAS08544-4431 with the new RAPID camera on the PIONIER beam combiner at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). A broadband image in the \textit{H} band was reconstructed by combining the data of all spectral channels using the SPARCO method. We spatially separate all the building blocks of the IRAS08544-4431 system in our milliarcsecond-resolution image. Our dissection reveals a dust sublimation front that is strikingly similar to that expected in early-stage protoplanetary disks, as well as an unexpected flux signal of $\sim$4\% from the secondary star. The energy output from this companion indicates the presence of a compact circum-companion accretion disk, which is likely the origin of the fast outflow detected in H$\alpha$. Our image provides the most detailed view into the heart of a dusty circumstellar disk to date. Our results demonstrate that binary evolution processes and circumstellar disk evolution can be studied in detail in space and over time.
  • Spatially resolving the inner dust cavity of the transitional disks is a key to understanding the connection between planetary formation and disk dispersal. The disk around the Herbig star HD 139614 is of particular interest since it presents a pretransitional nature with an au-sized gap, in the dust, that was spatially resolved by mid-IR interferometry. Using new NIR interferometric observations, we aim to characterize the 0.1-10~au region of the HD~139614 disk further and identify viable mechanisms for the inner disk clearing. We report the first multiwavelength radiative transfer modeling of the interferometric data acquired on HD~139614 with PIONIER, AMBER, and MIDI, complemented by Herschel/PACS photometries. We confirm a gap structure in the um-sized dust, extending from about 2.5 au to 6 au, and constrained the properties of the inner dust component: e.g., a radially increasing surface density profile, and a depletion of 10^3 relative to the outer disk. Since self-shadowing and photoevaporation appears unlikely to be responsible for the au-sized gap of HD~139614, we thus tested if dynamical clearing could be a viable mechanism using hydrodynamical simulations to predict the gaseous disk structure. Indeed, a narrow au-sized gap is expected when a single giant planet interacts with the disk. Assuming that small dust grains are well coupled to the gas, we found that a ~ 3~Mjup planet located at 4.5 au from the star could, in less than 1 Myr, reproduce most of the aspects of the dust surface density profile, while no significant depletion in gas occurred in the inner disk, in contrast to the dust. However, the dust-depleted inner disk could be explained by the expected dust filtration by the gap and the efficient dust growth/fragmentation in the inner disk regions. Our results support the hypothesis of a giant planet opening a gap and shaping the inner region of the HD~139614 disk.
  • The circumstellar environment of L2 Pup, an oxygen-rich semiregular variable, was observed to understand the evolution of mass loss and the shaping of ejecta in the late stages of stellar evolution. High-angular resolution observations from a single 8 m telescope were obtained using aperture masking in the near-infrared (1.64, 2.30 and 3.74 $\rm\mu m$) on the NACO/VLT, both in imaging and polarimetric modes. The aperture-masking images of L2 Pup at 2.30 $\rm\mu m$ show a resolved structure that resembles a toroidal structure with a major axis of ~140 milliarcseconds (mas) and an east-west orientation. Two clumps can be seen on either side of the star, ~65 mas from the star, beyond the edge of the circumstellar envelope (estimated diameter is ~27 mas), while a faint, hook-like structure appear toward the northeast. The patterns are visible both in the imaging and polarimetric mode, although the latter was only used to measure the total intensity (Stokes I). The overall shape of the structure is similar at the 3.74 $\rm\mu m$ pseudo-continuum (dust emission), where the clumps appear to be embedded within a dark, dusty lane. The faint, hook-like patterns are also seen at this wavelength, extending northeast and southwest with the central, dark lane being an apparent axis of symmetry. We interpret the structure as a circumstellar torus with inner radius of 4.2 au. With a rotation velocity of 10 km s$^{-1}$ as suggested by the SiO maser profile, we estimate a stellar mass of 0.7 M$_\odot$.}
  • HD 50138 is a B[e] star surrounded by a large amount of circumstellar gas and dust. Its spectrum shows characteristics which may indicate either a pre- or a post-main-sequence system. Mapping the kinematics of the gas in the inner few au of the system contributes to a better understanding of its physical nature. We present the first high spatial and spectral resolution interferometric observations of the Br-gamma line of HD~50138, obtained with VLTI/AMBER. The line emission originates from a region more compact (up to 3 au) than the continuum-emitting region. Blue- and red-shifted emission originates from the two different hemispheres of an elongated structure perpendicular to the polarization angle. The velocity of the emitting medium decreases radially. An overall offset along the NW direction between the line- and continuum-emitting regions is observed. We compare the data with a geometric model of a thin Keplerian disk and a spherical halo on top of a Gaussian continuum. Most of the data are well reproduced by this model, except for the variability, the global offset and the visibility at the systemic velocity. The evolutionary state of the system is discussed; most diagnostics are ambiguous and may point either to a post-main-sequence or a pre-main-sequence nature.
  • The emergence of optical interferometers with three and more telescopes allows image reconstruction of astronomical objects at the milliarcsecond scale. However, some objects contain components with very different spectral energy distributions (SED; i.e. different temperatures), which produces strong chromatic effects on the interferograms that have to be managed with care by image reconstruction algorithms. For example, the gray approximation for the image reconstruction process results in a degraded image if the total (u, v)-coverage given by the spectral supersynthesis is used. The relative flux contribution of the central object and an extended structure changes with wavelength for different temperatures. For young stellar objects, the known characteristics of the central object (i.e., stellar SED), or even the fit of the spectral index and the relative flux ratio, can be used to model the central star while reconstructing the image of the extended structure separately. Methods. We present a new method, called SPARCO (semi-parametric algorithm for the image reconstruction of chromatic objects), which describes the spectral characteristics of both the central object and the extended structure to consider them properly when reconstructing the image of the surrounding environment. We adapted two image-reconstruction codes (Macim, Squeeze, and MiRA) to implement this new prescription. SPARCO is applied using Macim, Squeeze and MiRA on a young stellar object model and also on literature data on HR5999 in the near-infrared with the VLTI. This method paves the way to improved aperture-synthesis imaging of several young stellar objects with existing datasets. More generally, the approach can be used on astrophysical sources with similar features such as active galactic nuclei, planetary nebulae, and asymptotic giant branch stars.
  • We aim at resolving the circumstellar environment around beta Pic in the near-infrared in order to study the inner planetary system (< 200 mas, i.e., ~4 AU). Precise interferometric fringe visibility measurements were obtained over seven spectral channels dispersed across the H band with the four-telescope VLTI/PIONIER interferometer. Thorough analysis of interferometric data was performed to measure the stellar angular diameter and to search for circumstellar material. We detected near-infrared circumstellar emission around beta Pic that accounts for 1.37% +/- 0.16% of the near-infrared stellar flux and that is located within the field-of-view of PIONIER (i.e., ~200 mas in radius). The flux ratio between this excess and the photosphere emission is shown to be stable over a period of 1 year and to vary only weakly across the H band, suggesting that the source is either very hot (> 1500 K) or dominated by the scattering of the stellar flux. In addition, we derived the limb-darkened angular diameter of beta Pic with an unprecedented accuracy (theta_LD= 0.736 +/- 0.019 mas). The presence of a small H-band excess originating in the vicinity of beta Pic is revealed for the first time thanks to the high-precision visibilities enabled by VLTI/PIONIER. This excess emission is likely due to the scattering of stellar light by circumstellar dust and/or the thermal emission from a yet unknown population of hot dust, although hot gas emitting in the continuum cannot be firmly excluded.
  • PIONIER stands for Precision Integrated-Optics Near-infrared Imaging ExpeRiment. It combines four 1.8m Auxilliary Telescopes or four 8m Unit Telescopes of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (ESO, Chile) using an integrated optics combiner. The instrument has been integrated at IPAG starting in December 2009 and commissioned at the Paranal Observatory in October 2010. It provides scientific observations since November 2010. In this paper, we detail the instrumental concept, we describe the standard operational modes and the data reduction strategy. We present the typical performance and discuss how to improve them. This paper is based on laboratory data obtained during the integrations at IPAG, as well as on-sky data gathered during the commissioning at VLTI. We illustrate the imaging capability of PIONIER on the binaries deltaSco and HIP11231. PIONIER provides 6 visibilities and 3 independent closure phases in the H band, either in a broadband mode or with a low spectral dispersion (R=40), using natural light (i.e. unpolarized). The limiting magnitude is Hmag=7 in dispersed mode under median atmospheric conditions (seeing<1", tau0>3ms) with the 1.8m Auxiliary Telescopes. We demonstrate a precision of 0.5deg on the closure phases. The precision on the calibrated visibilities ranges from 3 to 15% depending on the atmospheric conditions. PIONIER has been installed and successfully tested as a visitor instrument for the VLTI. It permits high angular resolution imaging studies at an unprecedented level of sensitivity. The successful combination of the four 8m Unit Telescopes in March 2011 demonstrates that VLTI is ready for 4-telescope operation.