• Debris disks are the intrinsic by-products of the star and planet formation processes. Most likely due to instrumental limitations and their natural faintness, little is known about debris disks around low-mass stars, especially when it comes to spatially resolved observations. We present new VLT/SPHERE IRDIS Dual-Polarization Imaging (DPI) observations in which we detect the dust ring around the M2 spectral type star TWA\,7. Combined with additional Angular Differential Imaging observations we aim at a fine characterization of the debris disk and setting constraints on the presence of low-mass planets. We model the SPHERE DPI observations and constrain the location of the small dust grains, as well as the spectral energy distribution of the debris disk, using the results inferred from the observations, and perform simple N-body simulations. We find that the dust density distribution peaks at 25 au, with a very shallow outer power-law slope, and that the disk has an inclination of 13 degrees with a position angle of 90 degrees East of North. We also report low signal-to-noise detections of an outer belt at a distance of ~52 au from the star, of a spiral arm in the Southern side of the star, and of a possible dusty clump at 3.9 au. These findings seem to persist over timescales of at least a year. Using the intensity images, we do not detect any planets in the close vicinity of the star, but the sensitivity reaches Jovian planet mass upper limits. We find that the SED is best reproduced with an inner disk at 7 au and another belt at 25 au. We report the detections of several unexpected features in the disk around TWA\,7. A yet undetected 100 M$_\oplus$ planet with a semi-major axis at 20-30 au could possibly explain the outer belt as well as the spiral arm. We conclude that stellar winds are unlikely to be responsible for the spiral arm.
  • HD95086 (A8V, 17Myr) hosts a rare planetary system for which a multi-belt debris disk and a giant planet of 4-5MJup have been directly imaged. Our study aims to characterize the physical and orbital properties of HD95086b, search for additional planets at short and wide orbits and image the cold outer debris belt in scattered light. We used HARPS at the ESO 3.6m telescope to monitor the radial velocity of HD95086 over 2 years and investigate the existence of giant planets at less than 3au orbital distance. With the IRDIS dual-band imager and the IFS integral field spectrograph of SPHERE at VLT, we imaged the faint circumstellar environment beyond 10au at six epochs between 2015 and 2017. We do not detect additional giant planets around HD95086. We identified the nature (bound companion or background contaminant) of all point-like sources detected in the IRDIS field of view. None of them correspond to the ones recently discovered near the edge of the cold outer belt by ALMA. HD95086b is resolved for the first time in J-band with IFS. Its near-infrared spectral energy distribution is well fitted by a few dusty and/or young L7-L9 dwarf spectral templates. The extremely red 1-4um spectral distribution is typical of low-gravity objects at the L/T spectral type transition. The planet's orbital motion is resolved between January 2015 and May 2017. Together with past NaCo measurements properly re-calibrated, our orbital fitting solutions favor a retrograde low to moderate-eccentricity orbit e=0.2 (0.0 to 0.5), with a semi-major axis 52au corresponding to orbital periods of 288$ yrs and an inclination that peaks at i = 141deg, which is compatible with a planet-disk coplanar configuration. Finally, we report the detection in polarimetric differential imaging of the cold outer debris belt between 100 and 300au, consistent in radial extent with recent ALMA 1.3mm resolved observations.
  • A large number of systems harboring a debris disk show evidence for a double belt architecture. One hypothesis for explaining the gap between the belts is the presence of one or more planets dynamically carving it. This work aims to investigate this scenario in systems harboring two components debris disks. All the targets in the sample were observed with the SPHERE instrument which performs high-contrast direct imaging. Positions of the inner and outer belts were estimated by SED fitting of the infrared excesses or, when available, from resolved images of the disk. Very few planets have been observed so far in debris disks gaps and we intended to test if such non-detections depend on the observational limits of the present instruments. This aim is achieved by deriving theoretical predictions of masses, eccentricities and semi-major axes of planets able to open the observed gaps and comparing such parameters with detection limits obtained with SPHERE. The relation between the gap and the planet is due to the chaotic zone around the orbit of the planet. The radial extent of this zone depends on the mass ratio between the planet and the star, on the semi-major axis and on the eccentricity of the planet and it can be estimated analytically. We apply the formalism to the case of one planet on a circular or eccentric orbit. We then consider multi-planetary systems: 2 and 3 equal-mass planets on circular orbits and 2 equal-mass planets on eccentric orbits in a packed configuration. We then compare each couple of values (M,a), derived from the dynamical analysis of single and multiple planetary models, with the detection limits obtained with SPHERE. Our results show that the apparent lack of planets in gaps between double belts could be explained by the presence of a system of two or more planets possibly of low mass and on an eccentric orbits whose sizes are below the present detection limits.
  • In this paper we present the results of the SPHERE observation of the HD 284149 system, aimed at a more detailed characterisation of both the primary and its brown dwarf companion. We observed HD 284149 in the near-infrared with SPHERE, using the imaging mode (IRDIS+IFS) and the long-slit spectroscopy mode (IRDIS-LSS). The data were reduced using the dedicated SPHERE pipeline, and algorithms such as PCA and TLOCI were applied to reduce the speckle pattern. The IFS images revealed a previously unknown low-mass (~0.16$M_{\odot}$) stellar companion (HD 294149 B) at ~0.1$^{\prime\prime}$, compatible with previously observed radial velocity differences, as well as proper motion differences between Gaia and Tycho-2 measurements. The known brown dwarf companion (HD 284149 b) is clearly visible in the IRDIS images. This allowed us to refine both its photometry and astrometry. The analysis of the medium resolution IRDIS long slit spectra also allowed a refinement of temperature and spectral type estimates. A full reassessment of the age and distance of the system was also performed, leading to more precise values of both mass and semi-major axis. As a result of this study, HD 284149 ABb therefore becomes the latest addition to the (short) list of brown dwarfs on wide circumbinary orbits, providing new evidence to support recent claims that object in such configuration occur with a similar frequency to wide companions to single stars.
  • Context. The SAO 206462 (HD 135344B) disk is one of the few known transitional disks showing asymmetric features in scattered light and thermal emission. Near-infrared scattered-light images revealed two bright outer spiral arms and an inner cavity depleted in dust. Giant protoplanets have been proposed to account for the disk morphology. Aims. We aim to search for giant planets responsible for the disk features and, in the case of non-detection, to constrain recent planet predictions using the data detection limits. Methods. We obtained new high-contrast and high-resolution total intensity images of the target spanning the Y to the K bands (0.95-2.3 mic) using the VLT/SPHERE near-infrared camera and integral field spectrometer. Results. The spiral arms and the outer cavity edge are revealed at high resolutions and sensitivities without the need for image post-processing techniques, which introduce photometric biases. We do not detect any close-in companions. For the derivation of the detection limits on putative giant planets embedded in the disk, we show that the knowledge of the disk aspect ratio and viscosity is critical for the estimation of the attenuation of a planet signal by the protoplanetary dust because of the gaps that these putative planets may open. Given assumptions on these parameters, the mass limits can vary from ~2-5 to ~4-7 Jupiter masses at separations beyond the disk spiral arms. The SPHERE detection limits are more stringent than those derived from archival NaCo/L' data and provide new constraints on a few recent predictions of massive planets (4-15 MJ) based on the spiral density wave theory. The SPHERE and ALMA data do not favor the hypotheses on massive giant planets in the outer disk (beyond 0.6). There could still be low-mass planets in the outer disk and/or planets inside the cavity.
  • Direct imaging has led to the discovery of several giant planet and brown dwarf companions. These imaged companions populate a mass, separation and age domain (mass>1MJup, orbits>5AU, age<1Gyr) quite distinct from the one occupied by exoplanets discovered by the radial velocity or transit methods. This distinction could pinpoint that different formation mechanisms are at play. We aim at investigating correlations between the host star's mass and the presence of wide-orbit giant planets, and at providing new observational constraints on planetary formation models. We observed 58 young and nearby M-type dwarfs in L'-band with the VLT/NaCo instrument and used ADI algorithms to optimize the sensitivity to planetary-mass companions and to derive the best detection limits. We estimate the probability of detecting a planet as a function of its mass and physical separation around each target. We conduct a Bayesian analysis to determine the frequency of substellar companions orbiting low-mass stars, using a homogenous sub-sample of 54 stars. We derive a frequency of $4.4^{+3.2}_{-1.3}\%$ for companions with masses in the range of 2-80MJup}, and $2.3^{+2.9}_{-0.7}$\% for planetary mass companions (2-14MJup), at physical separations of 8 to 400AU for both cases. Comparing our results with a previous survey targeting more massive stars, we find evidence that substellar companions more massive than 1MJup with a low mass ratio Q with respect to their host star (Q<1%), are less frequent around low-mass stars. This may represent an observational evidence that the frequency of imaged wide-orbit substellar companions is correlated with stellar mass, corroborating theoretical expectations. On the opposite, we show statistical evidence that intermediate-mass ratio (1%<Q<5%) companion with masses >2MJup might be independent from the mass of the host star.
  • We search for signs of ongoing planet-disk interaction and study the distribution of small grains at the surface of the transition disk around RXJ1615.3-3255 (RX J1615). We observed RXJ1615 with VLT/SPHERE. We image the disk for the first time in scattered light and detect two arcs, two rings, a gap and an inner disk with marginal evidence for an inner cavity. The shapes of the arcs suggest that they probably are segments of full rings. Ellipse fitting for the two rings and inner disk yield a disk inclination i = 47 \pm 2 degrees and find semi-major axes of 1.50 \pm 0.01" (278 au), 1.06 \pm 0.01" (196 au) and 0.30 \pm 0.01" (56 au), respectively. We determine the scattering surface height above the midplane, based on the projected ring center offsets. Nine point sources are detected between 2.1" and 8.0" separation and considered as companion candidates. With NACO data we recover four of the nine point sources, which we determine not to be co-moving, and therefore unbound to the system. We present the first detection of the transition disk of RXJ1615 in scattered light. The height of the rings indicate limited flaring of the disk surface, which enables partial self-shadowing in the disk. The outermost arc either traces the bottom of the disk or it is another ring with semi-major axis > 2.35" (435 au). We explore both scenarios, extrapolating the complete shape of the feature, which will allow to distinguish between the two in future observations. The most interesting scenario, where the arc traces the bottom of the outer ring, requires the disk truncated at r ~ 360 au. The closest companion candidate, if indeed orbiting the disk at 540 au, would then be the most likely cause for such truncation. This companion candidate, as well as the remaining four, require follow up observations to determine if they are bound to the system.
  • LkCa 15 hosts a pre-transitional disk as well as at least one accreting protoplanet orbiting in its gap. Previous disk observations have focused mainly on the outer disk, which is cleared inward of ~50 au. The planet candidates, on the other hand, reside at orbital radii around 15 au, where disk observations have been unreliable until recently. Here we present new J-band imaging polarimetry of LkCa 15 with SPHERE IRDIS, yielding the most accurate and detailed scattered-light images of the disk to date down to the planet-hosting inner regions. We find what appear to be persistent asymmetric structures in the scattering material at the location of the planet candidates, which could be responsible at least for parts of the signals measured with sparse-aperture masking. These images further allow us to trace the gap edge in scattered light at all position angles and search the inner and outer disks for morphological substructure. The outer disk appears smooth with slight azimuthal variations in polarized surface brightness, which may be due to shadowing from the inner disk or a two-peaked polarized phase function. We find that the near-side gap edge revealed by polarimetry matches the sharp crescent seen in previous ADI imaging very well. Finally, the ratio of polarized disk to stellar flux is more than six times larger in J-band than in the RI bands.
  • Debris disks offer valuable insights into the latest stages of circumstellar disk evolution, and can possibly help us to trace the outcomes of planetary formation processes. In the age range 10 to 100\,Myr, most of the gas is expected to have been removed from the system, giant planets (if any) must have already been formed, and the formation of terrestrial planets may be on-going. Pluto-sized planetesimals, and their debris released in a collisional cascade, are under their mutual gravitational influence, which may result into non-axisymmetric structures in the debris disk. High angular resolution observations are required to investigate these effects and constrain the dynamical evolution of debris disks. Furthermore, multi-wavelength observations can provide information about the dust dynamics by probing different grain sizes. Here we present new VLT/SPHERE and ALMA observations of the debris disk around the 40\,Myr-old solar-type star HD\,61005. We resolve the disk at unprecedented resolution both in the near-infrared (in scattered and polarized light) and at millimeter wavelengths. Thanks to the new observations, we propose a solution for both the radial and azimuthal distribution of the dust grains in the debris disk. We find that the disk has a moderate eccentricity ($e \sim 0.1$) and that the dust density is two times larger at the pericenter compared to the apocenter. With no giant planets detected in our observations, we investigate alternative explanations besides planet-disk interactions to interpret the inferred disk morphology. We postulate that the morphology of the disk could be the consequence of a massive collision between $\sim$\,1000\,km-sized bodies at $\sim$\,61\,au. If this interpretation holds, it would put stringent constraints on the formation of massive planetesimals at large distances from the star.
  • Transition disks correspond to a short stage between the young protoplanetary phase and older debris phase. Along this evolutionary sequence, the gas component disappears leaving room for a dust-dominated environment where already-formed planets signpost their gravitational perturbations. We endeavor to study the very inner region of the well-known and complex debris, but still gas-rich disk, around HD 141569A using the exquisite high-contrast capability of SPHERE at the VLT. Recent near-infrared (IR) images suggest a relatively depleted cavity within ~200 au, while former mid-IR data indicate the presence of dust at separations shorter than ~100 au. We obtained multi-wavelength images in the near-IR in J, H2, H3 and Ks bands with the IRDIS camera and a 0.95-1.35 micrometers spectral data cube with the IFS. Data were acquired in pupil-tracking mode, thus allowing for angular differential imaging. We discovered several new structures inside 1", of which the most prominent is a bright ring with sharp edges (semi-major axis: 0.4") featuring a strong north-south brightness asymmetry. Other faint structures are also detected from 0.4" to 1" in the form of concentric ringlets and at least one spiral arm. Finally, the VISIR data at 8.6 micrometers suggests the presence of an additional dust population closer in. Besides, we do not detect companions more massive than 1-3 mass of Jupiter. The performance of SPHERE allows us to resolve the extended dust component, which was previously detected at thermal and visible wavelengths, into very complex patterns with strong asymmetries ; the nature of these asymmetries remains to be understood. Scenarios involving shepherding by planets or dust-gas interactions will have to be tested against these observations.
  • HD~106906AB is so far the only young binary system around which a planet has been imaged and a debris disk evidenced thanks to a strong IR excess. As such, it represents a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of young planetary systems. We aim at further investigating the close (tens of au scales) environment of the HD~106906AB system. We used the extreme AO fed, high contrast imager SPHERE recently installed on the VLT to observe HD~106906. Both the IRDIS imager and the Integral Field Spectrometer were used. We discovered a very inclined, ring-like disk at a distance of 65~au from the star. The disk shows a strong brightness asymmetry with respect to its semi-major axis. It shows a smooth outer edge, compatible with ejection of small grains by the stellar radiation pressure. We show furthermore that the planet's projected position is significantly above the disk's PA. Given the determined disk inclination, it is not excluded though that the planet could still orbit within the disk plane if at a large separation (2000--3000 au). We identified several additional point sources in the SPHERE/IRDIS field-of-view, that appear to be background objects. We compare this system with other debris disks sharing similarities, and we briefly discuss the present results in the framework of dynamical evolution.
  • We report the discovery of a low-mass companion to the nearby (d = 47 pc) F7V star HD 984. The companion is detected 0.19" away from its host star in the L' band with the Apodizing Phase Plate on NaCo/VLT and was recovered by L'-band non-coronagraphic imaging data taken a few days later. We confirm the companion is co-moving with the star with SINFONI integral field spectrograph H+K data. We present the first published data obtained with SINFONI in pupil-tracking mode. HD 984 has been argued to be a kinematic member of the 30 Myr-old Columba group, and its HR diagram position is not altogether inconsistent with being a ZAMS star of this age. By consolidating different age indicators, including isochronal age, coronal X-ray emission, and stellar rotation, we independently estimate a main sequence age of 115$\pm$85 Myr (95% CL) which does not rely on this kinematic association. The mass of directly imaged companions are usually inferred from theoretical evolutionary tracks, which are highly dependent on the age of the star. Based on the age extrema, we demonstrate that with our photometric data alone, the companion's mass is highly uncertain: between 33 and 96 M$_{\rm Jup}$ (0.03-0.09 M$_{\odot}$) using the COND evolutionary models. We compare the companion's SINFONI spectrum with field dwarf spectra to break this degeneracy. Based on the slope and shape of the spectrum in the H-band, we conclude that the companion is an M$6.0\pm0.5$ dwarf. The age of the system is not further constrained by the companion, as M dwarfs are poorly fit on low-mass evolutionary tracks. This discovery emphasizes the importance of obtaining a spectrum to spectral type companions around F-stars.