• Strong-field ionization and rescattering beyond the long-wavelength limit of the dipole approximation is studied with elliptically polarized mid-IR pulses. We have measured the full three-dimensional photoelectron momentum distributions (3D PMDs) with velocity map imaging and tomographic reconstruction. The ellipticity-dependent 3D-PMD measurements revealed an unexpected sharp, thin line-shaped ridge structure in the polarization plane for low momentum photoelectrons. With classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) simulations and analytical methods we identified the associated ionization dynamics for this sharp ridge to be due to Coulomb focusing of slow recollisions of electrons with a momentum approaching zero. This ridge is another example of the many different ways how the Coulomb field of the parent ion influences the different parts of the momentum space of the ionized electron wave packet. Building on this new understanding of the PMD, we extend our studies on the role played by the magnetic field component of the laser beam when operating beyond the long-wavelength limit of the dipole approximation. In this regime, we find that the PMD exhibits an ellipticity-dependent asymmetry along the beam propagation direction: the peak of the projection of the PMD onto the beam propagation axis is shifted from negative to positive values with increasing ellipticity. This turnover occurs rapidly once the ellipticity exceeds $\sim$0.1. We identify the sharp, thin line-shaped ridge structure in the polarization plane as the origin of the ellipticity-dependent PMD asymmetry in the beam propagation direction. These results yield fundamental insights into strong-field ionization processes, and should increase the precision of the emerging applications relying on this technique, including time-resolved holography and molecular imaging.
  • We present a method for inverting charged particle velocity map images which incoorporates a non-uniform detection function. This method is applied to the specific case of extracting molecular axis alignment from Coulomb explosion imaging probes in which the probe itself has a dependence on molecular orientation which often removes cylindrical symmetry from the experiment and prevents the use of standard inversion techniques for the recovery of the molecular axis distribution. By incorporating the known detection function, it is possible to remove the angular bias of the Coulomb explosion probe process and invert the image to allow quantitative measurement of the degree of molecular axis alignment.
  • We report the breakdown of the electric dipole approximation in the long-wavelength limit in strong-field ionization with linearly polarized few-cycle mid-infrared laser pulses at intensities on the order of 10$^{13}$ W/cm$^2$. Photoelectron momentum distributions were recorded by velocity map imaging and projected onto the beam propagation axis. We observe an increasing shift of the peak of this projection opposite to the beam propagation direction with increasing laser intensities. From a comparison with semi-classical simulations, we identify the combined action of the magnetic field of the laser pulse and the Coulomb potential as origin of our observations.
  • This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray Free-Electron Laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular distributions of laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C8H5F) and dissociating, laseraligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C6H4Br2) molecules and discuss them in the larger context of photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules. We also show how the strong nanosecond laser pulse used for adiabatically laser-aligning the molecules influences the measured electron and ion spectra and angular distributions, and discuss how this may affect the outcome of future time-resolved photoelectron diffraction experiments.