• We present a 69 arcmin$^2$ ALMA survey at 1.1mm, GOODS-ALMA, matching the deepest HST-WFC3 H-band part of the GOODS-South field. We taper the 0"24 original image with a homogeneous and circular synthesized beam of 0"60 to reduce the number of independent beams - thus reducing the number of purely statistical spurious detections - and optimize the sensitivity to point sources. We extract a catalogue of galaxies purely selected by ALMA and identify sources with and without HST counterparts. ALMA detects 20 sources brighter than 0.7 mJy at 1.1mm in the 0"60 tapered mosaic (rms sensitivity $\sigma \simeq$ 0.18 mJy/beam) with a purity greater than 80%. Among these detections, we identify three sources with no HST nor Spitzer-IRAC counterpart, consistent with the expected number of spurious galaxies from the analysis of the inverted image; their definitive status will require additional investigation. An additional three sources with HST counterparts are detected either at high significance in the higher resolution map, or with different detection-algorithm parameters ensuring a purity greater than 80%. Hence we identify in total 20 robust detections. Our wide contiguous survey allows us to push further in redshift the blind detection of massive galaxies with ALMA with a median redshift of $\bar{z}$ = 2.92 and a median stellar mass of $\overline{M_{\star}}$ = 1.1 $\times 10^{11}$M$_\odot$. Our sample includes 20% HST-dark galaxies (4 out of 20), all detected in the mid-infrared with Spitzer-IRAC. The near-infrared based photometric redshifts of two of them ($z \sim$4.3 and 4.8) suggest that these sources have redshifts $z >$ 4. At least 40% of the ALMA sources host an X-ray AGN, compared to $\sim$14% for other galaxies of similar mass and redshift. The wide area of our ALMA survey provides lower values at the bright end of number counts than single-dish telescopes affected by confusion.
  • We consider a class of metabelian groups first studied by Baumslag and Stammbach and we show that these groups are consistent with the Bieri-Groves conjecture which relates cohomological finiteness conditions to the Bieri-Neumann-Strebel sigma invariant.
  • Tidal disruption events (TDEs), in which stars are gravitationally disrupted as they pass close to the supermassive black holes in the centres of galaxies, are potentially important probes of strong gravity and accretion physics. Most TDEs have been discovered in large-area monitoring surveys of many 1000s of galaxies, and the rate deduced for such events is relatively low: one event every 10$^4$ - 10$^5$ years per galaxy. However, given the selection effects inherent in such surveys, considerable uncertainties remain about the conditions that favour TDEs. Here we report the detection of unusually strong and broad helium emission lines following a luminous optical flare (Mv < -20.1 mag) in the nucleus of the nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy F01004-2237. The particular combination of variability and post-flare emission line spectrum observed in F01004-2237 is unlike any known supernova or active galactic nucleus. Therefore, the most plausible explanation for this phenomenon is a TDE -- the first detected in a galaxy with an ongoing massive starburst. The fact that this event has been detected in repeat spectroscopic observations of a sample of 15 ultra-luminous infrared galaxies over a period of just 10 years suggests that the rate of TDEs is much higher in such objects than in the general galaxy population.
  • We have carried out a survey of long 50ks XMM-Newton observations of a sample of bright, variable AGN. We found a distinctive energy dependence of the variability in RXJ0136.9-3510 where the fractional variability increases from 0.3 to 2 keV, and then remains constant. This is in sharp contrast to other AGN where the X-ray variability is either flat or falling with energy, sometimes with a peak at $\sim$~2 keV superimposed on the overall trend. Intriguingly these unusual characteristics of the variability are shared by one other AGN, namely RE J1034+396, which is so far unique showing a significant X-ray QPO. In addition the broad band spectrum of RXJ0136.9-3510 is also remarkably similar to that of RE J1034+396, being dominated by a huge soft excess in the EUV-soft X-ray bandpass. The bolometric luminosity of RX J0136.9-3510 gives an Eddington ratio of about 2.7 for a black hole mass (from the H beta line width) of $7.9 \times 10^{7}M_{\sun}$. This mass is about a factor of 50 higher than that of RE J1034+396, making any QPO undetectable in this length of observation. Nonetheless, its X-ray spectral and variability similarities suggest that RE J1034+396 is simply the closest representative of a new class of AGN spectra, representing the most extreme mass accretion rates.
  • We present a galaxy (SAGE1CJ053634.78-722658.5) at a redshift of 0.14 of which the IR is entirely dominated by emission associated with the AGN. We present the 5-37 um Spitzer/IRS spectrum and broad wavelength SED of SAGE1CJ053634, an IR point-source detected by Spitzer/SAGE (Meixner et al 2006). The source was observed in the SAGE-Spec program (Kemper et al., 2010) and was included to determine the nature of sources with deviant IR colours. The spectrum shows a redshifted (z=0.14+-0.005) silicate emission feature with an exceptionally high feature-to-continuum ratio and weak polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands. We compare the source with models of emission from dusty tori around AGNs from Nenkova et al. (2008). We present a diagnostic diagram that will help to identify similar sources based on Spitzer/MIPS and Herschel/PACS photometry. The SED of SAGE1CJ053634 is peculiar because it lacks far-IR emission and a clear stellar counterpart. We find that the SED and the IR spectrum can be understood as emission originating from the inner ~10 pc around an accreting black hole. There is no need to invoke emission from the host galaxy, either from the stars or from the interstellar medium, although a possible early-type host galaxy cannot be excluded based on the SED analysis. The hot dust around the accretion disk gives rise to a continuum, which peaks at 4 um, whereas the strong silicate features may arise from optically thin emission of dusty clouds within ~10 pc around the black hole. The weak PAH emission does not appear to be linked to star formation, as star formation templates strongly over-predict the measured far-IR flux levels. The SED of SAGE1CJ053634 is rare in the local universe but may be more common in the more distant universe. The conspicuous absence of host-galaxy IR emission places limits on the far-IR emission arising from the dusty torus alone.