• This work presents CHARA/VEGA H$\alpha$ spectro-interferometry (R ~ 6000, and $\lambda$/2B ~ 1 mas) of HD 179218 and HD 141569, doubling the sample of Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars for which this type of observations is available so far. The observed H$\alpha$ emission is spatially unresolved, indicating that the size of the H$\alpha$ emitting region is smaller than ~ 0.21 and 0.12 au for HD 179218 and HD 141529 (~ 15 and 16 R*, respectively). This is smaller than for the two other HAeBes previously observed with the same instrumentation. Two different scenarios have been explored in order to explain the compact line emitting regions. A hot, several thousand K, blackbody disc is consistent with the observations of HD 179218 and HD 141569. Magnetospheric accretion (MA) is able to reproduce the bulk of the H$\alpha$ emission shown by HD 179218, confirming previous estimates from MA shock modelling with a mass accretion rate of 10^-8 Msun/yr, and an inclination to the line of sight between 30 and 50 degr. The H$\alpha$ profile of HD 141569 cannot be fitted from MA due to the high rotational velocity of this object. Putting the CHARA sample together, a variety of scenarios is required to explain the H$\alpha$ emission in HAeBe stars -compact or extended, discs, accretion, and winds-, in agreement with previous Br$\gamma$ spectro-interferometric observations.
  • We analyze the spatial distribution of dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) identified in the Spitzer Survey of the Orion Molecular clouds, augmenting these data with Chandra X-ray observations to correct for incompleteness in dense clustered regions. We also devise a scheme to correct for spatially varying incompleteness when X-ray data are not available. The local surface densities of the YSOs range from 1 pc$^{-2}$ to over 10,000 pc$^{-2}$, with protostars tending to be in higher density regions. This range of densities is similar to other surveyed molecular clouds with clusters, but broader than clouds without clusters. By identifying clusters and groups as continuous regions with surface densities $\ge10$ pc$^{-2}$, we find that 59% of the YSOs are in the largest cluster, the Orion Nebular Cluster (ONC), while 13% of the YSOs are found in a distributed population. A lower fraction of protostars in the distributed population is evidence that it is somewhat older than the groups and clusters. An examination of the structural properties of the clusters and groups show that the peak surface densities of the clusters increase approximately linearly with the number of members. Furthermore, all clusters with more than 70 members exhibit asymmetric and/or highly elongated structures. The ONC becomes azimuthally symmetric in the inner 0.1 pc, suggesting that the cluster is only $\sim 2$ Myr in age. We find the star formation efficiency (SFE) of the Orion B cloud is unusually low, and that the SFEs of individual groups and clusters are an order of magnitude higher than those of the clouds. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the young low mass stars in the Orion clouds and the Orion OB 1 association, and we determine upper limits to the fraction of disks that may be affected by UV radiation from OB stars or by dynamical interactions in dense, clustered regions.
  • Correlations between the accretion luminosity and emission line luminosities (L_acc and L_line) of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars have been published for many different spectral lines, which are used to estimate accretion rates. Despite the origin of those correlations is unknown, this could be attributed to direct or indirect physical relations between the emission line formation and the accretion mechanism. This work shows that all (near-UV/optical/near-IR) L_acc-L_line correlations are the result of the fact that the accretion luminosity and the stellar luminosity (L_star) are correlated, and are not necessarily related with the physical origin of the line. Synthetic and observational data are used to illustrate how the L_acc-L_line correlations depend on the L_acc-L_star relationship. We conclude that because PMS stars show the L_acc-L_star correlation immediately implies that L_acc also correlates with the luminosity of all emission lines, for which the L_acc-L_line correlations alone do not prove any physical connection with accretion but can only be used with practical purposes to roughly estimate accretion rates. When looking for correlations with possible physical meaning, we suggest that L_acc/L_star and L_line/L_star should be used instead of L_acc and L_line. Finally, the finding that L_acc has a steeper dependence on L_star for T-Tauri stars than for intermediate-mass Herbig Ae/Be stars is also discussed. That is explained from the magnetospheric accretion scenario and the different photospheric properties in the near-UV.
  • We investigate new and archival 3-5 $\mu$m high resolution ($\sim3$ km s$^{-1}$) spectroscopy of molecular gas in the inner disk of the young solar-mass star EX Lupi, taken during and after the strong accretion outburst of 2008. The data were obtained using the CRIRES spectrometer at the ESO Very Large Telescope in 2008 and 2014. In 2008, emission lines from CO, H$_{2}$O, and OH were detected with broad profiles tracing gas near and within the corotation radius (0.02-0.3 AU). In 2014, the spectra display marked differences. The CO lines, while still detected, are much weaker, and the H$_{2}$O and OH lines have disappeared altogether. At 3 $\mu$m a veiled stellar photospheric spectrum is observed. Our analysis finds that the molecular gas mass in the inner disk has decreased by an order of magnitude since the outburst, matching a similar decrease in the accretion rate onto the star. We discuss these findings in the context of a rapid depletion of material accumulated beyond the disk corotation radius during quiescent periods, as proposed by models of episodic accretion in EXor type young stars.
  • This work presents X-Shooter/VLT spectra of the prototypical, isolated Herbig Ae stars HD 31648 (MWC 480) and HD 163296 over five epochs separated by timescales ranging from days to months. Each spectrum spans over a wide wavelength range covering from 310 to 2475 nm. We have monitored the continuum excess in the Balmer region of the spectra and the luminosity of twelve ultraviolet, optical and near infrared spectral lines that are commonly used as accretion tracers for T Tauri stars. The observed strengths of the Balmer excesses have been reproduced from a magnetospheric accretion shock model, providing a mean mass accretion rate of 1.11 x 10^-7 and 4.50 x 10^-7 Msun yr^-1 for HD 31648 and HD 163296, respectively. Accretion rate variations are observed, being more pronounced for HD 31648 (up to 0.5 dex). However, from the comparison with previous results it is found that the accretion rate of HD 163296 has increased by more than 1 dex, on a timescale of ~ 15 years. Averaged accretion luminosities derived from the Balmer excess are consistent with the ones inferred from the empirical calibrations with the emission line luminosities, indicating that those can be extrapolated to HAe stars. In spite of that, the accretion rate variations do not generally coincide with those estimated from the line luminosities, suggesting that the empirical calibrations are not useful to accurately quantify accretion rate variability.
  • High-energy radiation from T Tauri stars (TTS) influences the amount and longevity of gas in disks, thereby playing a crucial role in the creation of gas giant planets. Here we probe the high-energy ionizing radiation from TTS using high-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer IRS Neon forbidden line detections in a sample of disks from IC 348, NGC 2068, and Chamaeleon. We report three new detections of [Ne III] from CS Cha, SZ Cha, and T 54, doubling the known number of [Ne III] detections from TTS. Using [Ne III]-to-[Ne II] ratios in conjunction with X-ray emission measurements, we probe high-energy radiation from TTS. The majority of previously inferred [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios based on [Ne III] line upper limits are significantly less than 1, pointing to the dominance of either X-ray radiation or soft Extreme-Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation in producing these lines. Here we report the first observational evidence for hard EUV dominated Ne forbidden line production in a T Tauri disk: [Ne III]/[Ne II]~1 in SZ Cha. Our results provide a unique insight into the EUV emission from TTS, by suggesting that EUV radiation may dominate the creation of Ne forbidden lines, albeit in a minority of cases.
  • We present a survey of the Orion A and B molecular clouds undertaken with the IRAC and MIPS instruments onboard Spitzer. In total, five distinct fields were mapped covering 9 sq. degrees in five mid-IR bands spanning 3-24 microns. The survey includes the Orion Nebula Cluster, the Lynds 1641, 1630 and 1622 dark clouds, and the NGC 2023, 2024, 2068 and 2071 nebulae. These data are merged with the 2MASS point source catalog to generate a catalog of eight band photometry. We identify 3479 dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Orion molecular clouds by searching for point sources with mid-IR colors indicative of reprocessed light from dusty disks or infalling envelopes. The YSOs are subsequently classified on the basis of their mid-IR colors and their spatial distributions are presented. We classify 2991 of the YSOs as pre-main sequence stars with disks and 488 as likely protostars. Most of the sources were observed with IRAC in 2-3 epochs over 6 months; we search for variability between the epochs by looking for correlated variability in the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands. We find that 50% of the dusty YSOs show variability. The variations are typically small (0.2 mag.) with the protostars showing a higher incidence of variability and larger variations. The observed correlations between the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8 micron variability suggests that we are observing variations in the heating of the inner disk due to changes in the accretion luminosity or rotating accretion hot spots.
  • We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine photometry from 2MASS J, H, and Ks bands and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 micron bands to create 1 - 24 micron spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities (Lbol), we derive a relationship between Lbol, L_MIR (integrated from 1 - 24 microns), and SED slope. Estimations of Lbol for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high mass star forming clouds peak near 1 Lsun and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 Lsun. The luminosity functions of the low mass star forming clouds do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 Lsun. Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of YSOs. In the Orion molecular cloud, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity functions to those predicted by models and find that our observed luminosity functions are best matched by models which invoke competitive accretion, although we do not find strong agreement of the high mass star forming clouds with any of the models.
  • Two decades ago "transitional disks" described spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of T Tauri stars with small near-IR excesses, but significant mid- and far-IR excesses. Many inferred this indicated dust-free holes in disks, possibly cleared by planets. Recently, this term has been applied disparately to objects whose Spitzer SEDs diverge from the expectations for a typical full disk. Here we use irradiated accretion disk models to fit the SEDs of 15 such disks in NGC 2068 and IC 348. One group has a "dip" in infrared emission while the others' continuum emission decreases steadily at all wavelengths. We find that the former have an inner disk hole or gap at intermediate radii in the disk and we call these objects "transitional" and pre-transitional" disks, respectively. For the latter group, we can fit these SEDs with full disk models and find that millimeter data are necessary to break the degeneracy between dust settling and disk mass. We suggest the term "transitional" only be applied to objects that display evidence for a radical change in the disk's radial structure. Using this definition, we find that transitional and pre-transitional disks tend to have lower mass accretion rates than full disks and that transitional disks have lower accretion rates than pre-transitional disks. These reduced accretion rates onto the star could be linked to forming planets. Future observations of transitional and pre-transitional disks will allow us to better quantify the signatures of planet formation in young disks.
  • This work aims to derive accretion rates for a sample of 38 HAeBe stars. We apply magnetospheric accretion (MA) shock modelling to reproduce the observed Balmer excesses. We look for possible correlations with the strength of the Halpha, [OI]6300, and Brgamma emission lines. The median mass accretion rate is 2 x 10^-7 Msun yr^-1 in our sample. The model fails to reproduce the large Balmer excesses shown by the four hottest stars (T* > 12000 K). We derive Macc propto M*^5 and Lacc propto L*^1.2 for our sample, with scatter. Empirical calibrations relating the accretion and the Halpha, [OI]6300, and Brgamma luminosities are provided. The slopes in our expressions are slightly shallower than those for lower mass stars, but the difference is within the uncertainties, except for the [OI]6300 line. The Halpha 10% width is uncorrelated with Macc, unlike for the lower mass regime. The mean Halpha width shows higher values as the projected rotational velocities of HAe stars increase, which agrees with MA. The accretion rate variations in the sample are typically lower than 0.5 dex on timescales of days to months, Our data suggest that the changes in the Balmer excess are uncorrelated to the simultaneous changes of the line luminosities. The Balmer excesses and Halpha line widths of HAe stars can be interpreted within the context of MA, which is not the case for several HBes. The steep trend relating Macc and M* can be explained from the mass-age distribution characterizing HAeBe stars. The line luminosities used for low-mass objects are also valid to estimate typical accretion rates for the intermediate-mass regime under similar empirical expressions. However, we suggest that several of these calibrations are driven by the stellar luminosity.
  • We present a Spitzer IRS study of variability in 14 T Tauri stars in the Taurus and Chamaeleon star-forming regions. The sample is composed of transitional and pre-transitional objects which contain holes and gaps in their disks. We detect variability between 5-38 microns in all but two of our objects on timescales of 2-3 years. Most of the variability observed can be classified as seesaw behavior, whereby the emission at shorter wavelengths varies inversely with the emission at longer wavelengths. For many of the objects we can reasonably reproduce the observed variability using irradiated disk models, particularly by changing the height of the inner disk wall by ~20%. When the inner wall is taller, the emission at the shorter wavelengths is higher since the inner wall dominates the emission at 2-8 microns. The taller inner wall casts a larger shadow on the outer disk wall, leading to less emission at wavelengths beyond 20 microns where the outer wall dominates. We discuss how the possible presence of planets in these disks could lead to warps which cause changes in the height of the inner wall. We also find that crystalline silicates are common in the outer disks of our objects and that in the four disks in the sample with the most crystalline silicates, variability on timescales of 1 week is present. In addition to explaining the infrared variability described above, planets can create shocks and collisions which can crystallize the dust and lead to short timescale variability.
  • We present IRAC/MIPS Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the solar type and the low mass stellar population of the young (~5 Myr) Lambda Orionis cluster. Combining optical and 2MASS photometry, we identify 436 stars as probable members of the cluster. Given the distance (450 pc) and the age of the cluster, our sample ranges in mass from 2 solar mass to objects below the substellar limit. With the addition of the Spitzer mid-infrared data, we have identified 49 stars bearing disks in the stellar cluster. Using spectral energy distribution (SED) slopes, we place objects in several classes: non-excess stars (diskless), stars with optically thick disks, stars with ``evolved disks''( with smaller excesses than optically thick disk systems), and ``transitional disks'' candidates (in which the inner disk is partially or fully cleared). The disk fraction depends on the stellar mass, ranging from ~6% for K type stars (Rc-J<2) to ~27% for stars with spectral type M5 or later (Rc-J>4). We confirm the dependence of disk fraction on stellar mass in this age range found in other studies. Regarding clustering levels, the overall fraction of disks in the Lambda Orionis cluster is similar to those reported in other stellar groups with ages normally quoted as ~5 Myr.
  • Spectral observations of classical T Tauri stars show a wide range of line profiles, many of which reveal signs of matter inflow and outflow. Halpha is the most commonly observed line profile due to its intensity, and it is highly dependent on the characteristics of the surrounding environment of these stars. Our aim is to analyze how the Halpha line profile is affected by the various parameters of our model which contains both the magnetospheric and disk wind contributions to the Halpha flux. We used a dipolar axisymmetric stellar magnetic field to model the stellar magnetosphere and a modified Blandford & Payne model was used in our disk wind region. A three-level atom with continuum was used to calculate the required Hydrogen level populations. We use the Sobolev approximation and a ray-by-ray method to calculate the integrated line profile. Through an extensive study of the model parameter space, we have investigated the contribution of many of the model parameters on the calculated line profiles. Our results show that the Halpha line is strongly dependent on the densities and temperatures inside the magnetosphere and the disk wind region. The bulk of the flux comes, most of the time, from the magnetospheric component for standard classical T Tauri stars parameters, but the disk wind contribution becomes more important as the mass accretion rate, the temperatures and densities inside the disk wind increase. We have also found that most of the disk wind contribution to the Halpha line is emitted at the innermost region of the disk wind. Models that take into consideration both inflow and outflow of matter are a necessity to fully understand and describe classical T Tauri stars.
  • We present Chandra X-ray data of the NGC 1333 embedded cluster, combining these data with existing Chandra data, Sptizer photometry and ground based spectroscopy of both the NGC 1333 & Serpens North clusters to perform a detailed study of the X-ray properties of two of the nearest embedded clusters to the Sun. In NGC 1333, a total of 95 cluster members are detected in X-rays, of which 54 were previously identified with Spitzer. Of the Spitzer sources, we detect 23% of the Class I protostars, 53% of the Flat Spectrum sources, 52% of the Class II, and 50% of the Transition Disk YSOs. Forty-one Class III members of the cluster are identified, bringing the total identified YSO population to 178. The X-ray Luminosity Functions (XLFs) of the NGC 1333 and Serpens clusters are compared to each other and the Orion Nebula Cluster. Based on this comparison, we obtain a new distance for the Serpens cluster of 360+22/-13 pc. The X-ray luminosity was found to depend on the bolometric luminosity as in previous studies of other clusters, and that Lx depends primarily on the stellar surface area. In the NGC 1333 cluster, the Class III sources have a somewhat higher X-ray luminosity for a given surface area. We also find evidence in NGC 1333 for a jump in the X-ray luminosity between spectral types of M0 and K7, we speculate that this may result from the presence of radiative zones in the K-stars. The gas column density vs. extinction in the NGC 1333 was found to be N_H = 0.89 +/- 0.13 x 10^22 A_K, this is lower than expected of the standard ISM but similar to that found previously in the Serpens Cloud Core.
  • In the past few years, several disks with inner holes that are empty of small dust grains have been detected and are known as transitional disks. Recently, Spitzer has identified a new class of "pre-transitional disks" with gaps; these objects have an optically thick inner disk separated from an optically thick outer disk by an optically thin disk gap. A near-infrared spectrum provided the first confirmation of a gap in the pre-transitional disk of LkCa 15 by verifying that the near-infrared excess emission in this object was due to an optically thick inner disk. Here we investigate the difference between the nature of the inner regions of transitional and pre-transitional disks using the same veiling-based technique to extract the near-infrared excess emission above the stellar photosphere. We show that the near-infrared excess emission of the previously identified pre-transitional disks of LkCa 15 and UX Tau A in Taurus as well as the newly identified pre-transitional disk of ROX 44 in Ophiuchus can be fit with an inner disk wall located at the dust destruction radius. We also model the broad-band SEDs of these objects, taking into account the effect of shadowing by the inner disk on the outer disk, considering the finite size of the star. The near-infrared excess continua of these three pre-transitional disks, which can be explained by optically thick inner disks, are significantly different from that of the transitional disks of GM Aur, whose near-infrared excess continuum can be reproduced by emission from sub-micron-sized optically thin dust, and DM Tau, whose near-infrared spectrum is consistent with a disk hole that is relatively free of small dust. The structure of pre-transitional disks may be a sign of young planets forming in these disks and future studies of pre-transitional disks will provide constraints to aid in theoretical modeling of planet formation.
  • We present 70 and 160 micron Herschel science demonstration images of a field in the Orion A molecular cloud that contains the prototypical Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and 2, obtained with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS). These observations demonstrate Herschel's unprecedented ability to study the rich population of protostars in the Orion molecular clouds at the wavelengths where they emit most of their luminosity. The four protostars previously identified by Spitzer 3.6-40 micron imaging and spectroscopy are detected in the 70 micron band, and three are clearly detected at 160 microns. We measure photometry of the protostars in the PACS bands and assemble their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from 1 to 870 microns with these data, Spitzer spectra and photometry, 2MASS data, and APEX sub-mm data. The SEDs are fit to models generated with radiative transfer codes. From these fits we can constrain the fundamental properties of the protostars. We find luminosities in the range 12-84 L_sun and envelope densities spanning over two orders of magnitude. This implies that the four protostars have a wide range of envelope infall rates and evolutionary states: two have dense, infalling envelopes, while the other two have only residual envelopes. We also show the highly irregular and filamentary structure of the cold dust and gas surrounding the protostars as traced at 160 microns.
  • The NGC 1999 reflection nebula features a dark patch with a size of ~10,000 AU, which has been interpreted as a small, dense foreground globule and possible site of imminent star formation. We present Herschel PACS far-infrared 70 and 160mum maps, which reveal a flux deficit at the location of the globule. We estimate the globule mass needed to produce such an absorption feature to be a few tenths to a few Msun. Inspired by this Herschel observation, we obtained APEX LABOCA and SABOCA submillimeter continuum maps, and Magellan PANIC near-infrared images of the region. We do not detect a submillimer source at the location of the Herschel flux decrement; furthermore our observations place an upper limit on the mass of the globule of ~2.4x10^-2 Msun. Indeed, the submillimeter maps appear to show a flux depression as well. Furthermore, the near-infrared images detect faint background stars that are less affected by extinction inside the dark patch than in its surroundings. We suggest that the dark patch is in fact a hole or cavity in the material producing the NGC 1999 reflection nebula, excavated by protostellar jets from the V 380 Ori multiple system.
  • Using data from the SCUBA Legacy Catalogue (850 um) and Spitzer Space Telescope (3.6 - 70 um), we explore dense cores in the Ophiuchus, Taurus, Perseus, Serpens, and Orion molecular clouds. We develop a new method to discriminate submillimeter cores found by SCUBA as starless or protostellar, using point source photometry from Spitzer wide field surveys. First, we identify infrared sources with red colors associated with embedded young stellar objects (YSOs). Second, we compare the positions of these YSO-candidates to our submillimeter cores. With these identifications, we construct new, self-consistent starless and protostellar core mass functions (CMFs) for the five clouds. We find best fit slopes to the high-mass end of the CMFs of -1.26 +/- 0.20, -1.22 +/- 0.06, -0.95 +/- 0.20, and -1.67 +/- 0.72 for Ophiuchus, Taurus, Perseus, and Orion, respectively. Broadly, these slopes are each consistent with the -1.35 power-law slope of the Salpeter IMF at higher masses, but suggest some differences. We examine a variety of trends between these CMF shapes and their parent cloud properties, potentially finding a correlation between the high-mass slope and core temperature. We also find a trend between core mass and effective size, but we are very limited by sensitivity. We make similar comparisons between core mass and size with visual extinction (for A_V >= 3) and find no obvious trends. We also predict the numbers and mass distributions of cores that future surveys with SCUBA-2 may detect in each of these clouds.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of structure in the young, embedded cluster, NGC 1333 using members identified with Spitzer and 2MASS photometry based on their IR-excess emission. In total, 137 members are identified in this way, composed of 39 protostars and 98 more evolved pre-main sequence stars with disks. Of the latter class, four are transition/debris disk candidates. The fraction of exposed pre-main sequence stars with disks is 83% +/- 11%, showing that there is a measurable diskless pre-main sequence population. The sources in each of the Class I and Class II evolutionary states are shown to have very different spatial distributions relative to the distribution of the dense gas in their natal cloud. However, the distribution of nearest neighbor spacings among these two groups of sources are found to be quite similar, with a strong peak at spacings of 0.045 pc. Radial and azimuthal density profiles and surface density maps computed from the identified YSOs show that NGC 1333 is elongated and not strongly centrally concentrated, confirming previous claims in the literature. We interpret these new results as signs of a low velocity dispersion, extremely young cluster that is not in virial equilibrium.
  • We present spectral observations of 130 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Serpens Cloud Core and NGC 1333 embedded clusters. The observations consist of near-IR spectra in the H and K-bands, from SpeX on the IRTF and far-red spectra (6000 - 9000 A) from Hectospec on the MMT. These YSOs were identified in previous Spitzer and Chandra observations, and the evolutionary classes of the YSOs were determined from the Spitzer mid-IR photometry. With these spectra, we search for corroborating evidence for the pre-main sequence nature of the objects, study the properties of the detected emission lines as a function of evolutionary class, and obtain spectral types for the observed YSOs. By comparing the positions of the YSOs in the HR diagrams with the pre-main sequence tracks of Baraffe (1998), we determine ages of the embedded sources and study the relative ages of the YSOs with and without optically thick circumstellar disks. The apparent isochronal ages of the YSOs in both clusters range from less than 1 Myr to 10 Myr, with most objects below 3 Myr. The observed distribution of ages for the Class II and Class III objects are statistically indistinguishable. We examine the spatial distribution and extinction of the YSOs as a function of their isochronal ages. We find the sources < 3 Myr to be concentrated in the molecular cloud gas while the older sources are spatially dispersed and are not deeply embedded. Nonetheless, the sources with isochronal ages > 3 Myr show all the characteristics of young stellar objects in their spectra, their IR spectral energy distributions, and their X-ray emission.
  • Here we present the Spitzer IRS spectrum of CVSO 224, the sole transitional disk located within the ~10 Myr old 25 Orionis group in Orion OB1a. A model fit to the spectral energy distribution of this object indicates a ~7 AU inner disk hole that contains a small amount of optically thin dust. In previous studies, CVSO 224 had been classified as a weak-line T Tauri star based on its Halpha equivalent width, but here we find an accretion rate of 7x10^-11 Msun/yr based on high-resolution Hectochelle data. CVSO 224's low mass accretion rate is in line with photoevaporative clearing theories. However, the Spitzer IRS spectrum of CVSO 224 has a substantial mid-infrared excess beyond 20microns which indicates that it is surrounded by a massive outer disk. Millimeter measurements are necessary to constrain the mass of the outer disk around CVSO 224 in order to confirm that photoevaporation is not the mechanism behind creating its inner disk hole.
  • We present HST/NICMOS Paschen alpha images and low and high resolution IRS spectra of photoevaporating disk-tail systems originally detected at 24 micron near O stars. We find no Paschen alpha emission in any of the systems. The resulting upper limits correspond to about 0.000002-0.000003 solar mass of mass in hydrogen in the tails suggesting that the gas is severely depleted. The IRAC data and the low resolution 5-12 micron IRS spectra provide evidence for an inner disk while high resolution long wavelength (14-30 micron) IRS spectra confirm the presence of a gas free ``tail'' that consists of ~ 0.01 to ~ 1 micron dust grains originating in the outer parts of the circumstellar disks. Overall our observations support theoretical predictions in which photoevaporation removes the gas relatively quickly (<= 100000 yrs) from the outer region of a protoplanetary disk but leaves an inner more robust and possibly gas-rich disk component of radius 5-10 AU. With the gas gone, larger solid bodies in the outer disk can experience a high rate of collisions and produce elevated amounts of dust. This dust is being stripped from the system by the photon pressure of the O star to form a gas-free dusty tail.
  • We study the formation of the calcium II infrared triplet lines 8498\AA, 8542\AA and 8662\AA, in the accreting magnetospheric flows of Classical T Tauri stars (CTTS), and present a grid of models for a large range of magnetospheric conditions. We apply our models to the interpretation of multi epoch observations of the CTTS DI Cep. We find that these lines form in the magnetospheric infall and that the variability of the CaII triplet lines in DI Cep can be explained in the context of changes in the mass accretion rate/temperature of the accretion column gas.
  • We have surveyed the 30 Myr-old cluster NGC 2547 for planetary debris disks using Spitzer. At 4.5-8 um we are sensitive to the photospheric level down to mid-M stars (0.2 Msol) and at 24 um to early-G stars (1.2 Msol). We find only two to four stars with excesses at 8 um out of ~400-500 cluster members, resulting in an excess fraction <~1 percent at this wavelength. By contrast, the excess fraction at 24 um is ~40 percent (for B-F types). Out of four late-type stars with excesses at 8 um two marginal ones are consistent with asteroid-like debris disks. Among stars with strong 8 um excesses one is possibly from a transitional disk, while another one can be a result of a catastrophic collision. Our survey demonstrates that the inner 0.1-1 AU parts of disks around solar-type stars clear out very thoroughly by 30 Myrs of age. Comparing with the much slower decay of excesses at 24 and 70 um, disks clear from the inside out, of order 10 Myr for the inner zones probed at 8 um compared with a hundred or more Myr for those probed with the two longer wavelengths.
  • We present Spitzer and Chandra observations of the nearby (~260 pc) embedded stellar cluster in the Serpens Cloud Core. We observed, using Spitzer's IRAC and MIPS instruments, in six wavelength bands from 3 to 70 ${\mu}m$, to detect thermal emission from circumstellar disks and protostellar envelopes, and to classify stars using color-color diagrams and spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These data are combined with Chandra observations to examine the effects of circumstellar disks on stellar X-ray properties. Young diskless stars were also identified from their increased X-ray emission. We have identified 138 YSOs in Serpens: 22 class 0/I, 16 flat spectrum, 62 class II, 17 transition disk, and 21 class III stars; 60 of which exhibit X-ray emission. Our primary results are the following: 1.) ten protostars detected previously in the sub-millimeter are detected at lambda < 24 microns, seven at lambda < 8 microns, 2.) the protostars are more closely grouped than more evolved YSOs (median separation : ~0.024 pc, and 3.) the luminosity and temperature of the X-ray emitting plasma around these YSOs does not show any significant dependence on evolutionary class. We combine the infrared derived values of AK and X-ray values of NH for 8 class III objects and find that the column density of hydrogen gas per mag of extinctions is less than half the standard interstellar value, for AK > 1. This may be the result of grain growth through coagulation and/or the accretion of volatiles in the Serpens cloud core.