• The density and isospin dependences of the nonrelativistic nucleon effective mass ($m^*$) are studied, which is a measure of the nonlocality of the single particle (s.p.) potential. We decouple it further into the so called k-mass ($m^*_k$, i.e., the nonlocality in space) and E-mass ($m^*_E$, i.e., the nonlocality in time). Both masses are determined and compared from the latest versions of the nonrelativistic Brueckner-Hartree Fock (BHF) model and the relativistic Hartree-Fock (RHF) model. The latter are achieved based on the corresponding Schr\"{o}dinger equivalent s.p. potential in a relativistic framework. We demonstrate the origins of different effective masses and discuss also their neutron-proton splitting in the asymmetric matter in different models. We find that the neutron-proton splittings of both the k-mass and the E-mass have the same asymmetry dependences at considered densities, namely $m^*_{k,n} > m^*_{k,p}$ and $m^*_{E,p} > m^*_{E,n}$. However, the resulting splittings of nucleon effective masses could have different asymmetry dependences in the two models, because they could be dominated either by that of the k-mass (then we have $m^*_n > m^*_p$ in the BHF model) or by that of the E-mass (then we have $m^*_p > m^*_n$ in the RHF model).
  • We develop a self-consistent description of hot nuclei within the relativistic Thomas--Fermi approximation using the relativistic mean-field model for nuclear interactions. The temperature dependence of the symmetry energy and other physical quantities of a nucleus are calculated by employing the subtraction procedure in order to isolate the nucleus from the surrounding nucleon gas. It is found that the symmetry energy coefficient of finite nuclei is significantly affected by the Coulomb polarization effect. We also examine the dependence of the results on nuclear interactions and make a comparison between the results obtained from relativistic and nonrelativistic Thomas-Fermi calculations.
  • We study the effects of the symmetry energy on the neutron drip density and properties of nuclei in neutron star crusts. The nonuniform matter around the neutron drip point is calculated by using the Thomas--Fermi approximation with the relativistic mean-field model. The neutron drip density and the composition of the crust are found to be correlated with the symmetry energy and its slope. We compare the self-consistent Thomas--Fermi approximation with other treatments of surface and Coulomb energies and find that these finite-size effects play an essential role in determining the equilibrium state at low density.
  • Relativistic mean field theory is formulated with the Green's function method in coordinate space to investigate the single-particle bound states and resonant states on the same footing. Taking the density of states for free particle as a reference, the energies and widths of single-particle resonant states are extracted from the density of states without any ambiguity. As an example, the energies and widths for single-neutron resonant states in $^{120}$Sn are compared with those obtained by the scattering phase-shift method, the analytic continuation in the coupling constant approach, the real stabilization method and the complex scaling method. Excellent agreements are found for the energies and widths of single-neutron resonant states.
  • We extend the quark mean-field (QMF) model to strangeness freedom to study the properties of hyperons ($\Lambda,\Sigma,\Xi$) in infinite baryon matter and neutron star properties. The baryon-scalar meson couplings in the QMF model are determined self-consistently from the quark level, where the quark confinement is taken into account in terms of a scalar-vector harmonic oscillator potential. The strength of such confinement potential for $u,d$ quarks is constrained by the properties of finite nuclei, while the one for $s$ quark is limited by the properties of nuclei with a $\Lambda$ hyperon. These two strengths are not same, which represents the SU(3) symmetry breaking effectively in the QMF model. Also, we use an enhanced $\Sigma$ coupling with the vector meson, and both $\Sigma$ and $\Xi$ hyperon potentials can be properly described in the model. The effects of the SU(3) symmetry breaking on the neutron star structures are then studied. We find that the SU(3) breaking shifts earlier the hyperon onset density and makes hyperons more abundant in the star, in comparisons with the results of the SU(3) symmetry case. However, it does not affect much the star's maximum mass. The maximum masses are found to be $1.62 M_{\odot}$ with hyperons and $1.88 M_{\odot}$ without hyperons. The present neutron star model is shown to have limitations on explaining the recently measured heavy pulsar.
  • The study of hypernuclei in the quark mean-field model are extended from single-$\Lambda$ hypernuclei to double-$\Lambda$ hypernuclei as well as $\Xi$ hypernuclei (double strangeness nuclei), with a broken SU(3) symmetry for the quark confinement potential. The strength of the potential for $u,d$ quarks is constrained by the properties of finite nuclei, while the one for $s$ quark is fixed by the single $\Lambda$-nucleus potential at the nuclear saturation density, which has a slightly different value. Compared to our previous work, we find that the introduction of such symmetry breaking improves efficiently the description of the single $\Lambda$ energies for a wide range of mass region, which demonstrates the importance of this effect on the hypernuclei study. Predictions for double-$\Lambda$ hypernuclei and $\Xi$ hypernuclei are then made, confronting with a few available experiential double-$\Lambda$ hypernuclei data and other model calculations. The consistency of our results with the available double-$\Lambda$ hypernucleus is found to be surprisingly good. Also, there is generally a bound state for $\Xi^0$ hypernuclei with both light and heavy core nuclei in our model.
  • Using the relativistic point-coupling model with density functional PC-PK1, the magnetic moments of the nuclei $^{207}$Pb, $^{209}$Pb, $^{207}$Tl and $^{209}$Bi with a $jj$ closed-shell core $^{208}$Pb are studied on the basis of relativistic mean field (RMF) theory. The corresponding time-odd fields, the one-pion exchange currents, and the first- and second-order corrections are taken into account. The present relativistic results reproduce the data well. The relative deviation between theory and experiment for these four nuclei is 6.1% for the relativistic calculations and somewhat smaller than the value of 13.2% found in earlier non-relativistic investigations. It turns out that the $\pi$ meson is important for the description of magnetic moments, first by means of one-pion exchange currents and second by the residual interaction provided by the $\pi$ exchange.