• We present a newly discovered correlation between the wind outflow velocity and the X-ray luminosity in the luminous ($L_{\rm bol}\sim10^{47}\,\rm erg\,s^{-1}$) nearby ($z=0.184$) quasar PDS\,456. All the contemporary XMM-Newton, NuSTAR and Suzaku observations from 2001--2014 were revisited and we find that the centroid energy of the blueshifted Fe\,K absorption profile increases with luminosity. This translates into a correlation between the wind outflow velocity and the hard X-ray luminosity (between 7--30\,keV) where we find that $v_{\rm w}/c \propto L_{7-30}^{\gamma}$ where $\gamma=0.22\pm0.04$. We also show that this is consistent with a wind that is predominately radiatively driven, possibly resulting from the high Eddington ratio of PDS\,456.
  • We perform an X-ray spectral analysis of the brightest and cleanest bare AGN known so far, Ark 120, in order to determine the process(es) at work in the vicinity of the SMBH. We present spectral analysis of data from an extensive campaign observing Ark 120 in X-rays with XMM-Newton (4$\times$120 ks, 2014 March 18-24), and NuSTAR (65.5 ks, 2014 March 22). During this very deep X-ray campaign, the source was caught in a high flux state similar to the earlier 2003 XMM-Newton observation, and about twice as bright as the lower-flux observation in 2013. The spectral analysis confirms the "softer when brighter" behaviour of Ark 120. The four XMM-Newton/pn spectra are characterized by the presence of a prominent soft X-ray excess and a significant FeK$\alpha$ complex. The continuum is very similar above about 3 keV, while significant variability is present for the soft X-ray excess. We find that relativistic reflection from a constant-density, flat accretion disk cannot simultaneously produce the soft excess, broad FeK$\alpha$ complex, and hard X-ray excess. Instead, Comptonization reproduces the broadband (0.3-79 keV) continuum well, together with a contribution from a mildly relativistic disk reflection spectrum. During this 2014 observational campaign, the soft X-ray spectrum of Ark 120 below $\sim$0.5 keV was found to be dominated by Comptonization of seed photons from the disk by a warm ($kT_{\rm e}$$\sim$0.5 keV), optically-thick corona ($\tau$$\sim$9). Above this energy, the X-ray spectrum becomes dominated by Comptonization from electrons in a hot optically thin corona, while the broad FeK$\alpha$ line and the mild Compton hump result from reflection off the disk at several tens of gravitational radii.
  • We present an analysis of a $190$\,ks (net exposure) \textit{Suzaku} observation, carried out in 2007, of the nearby ($z=0.184$) luminous (L$_{\rm bol}\sim10^{47}$\,erg\,s$^{-1}$) quasar PDS\,456. In this observation, the intrinsically steep bare continuum is revealed compared to subsequent observations, carried out in 2011 and 2013, where the source is fainter, harder and more absorbed. We detected two pairs of prominent hard and soft flares, restricted to the first and second half of the observation respectively. The flares occur on timescales of the order of $\sim50$\,ks, which is equivalent to a light-crossing distance of $\sim10\,R_{\rm g}$ in PDS\,456. From the spectral variability observed during the flares, we find that the continuum changes appear to be dominated by two components: (i) a variable soft component ($<2$\,keV), which may be related to the Comptonized tail of the disc emission, and (ii) a variable hard power-law component ($>2$\,keV). The photon index of the latter power-law component appears to respond to changes in the soft band flux, increasing during the soft X-ray flares. Here the softening of the spectra, observed during the flares, may be due to Compton cooling of the disc corona induced by the increased soft X-ray photon seed flux. In contrast, we rule out partial covering absorption as the physical mechanism behind the observed short timescale spectral variability, as the timescales are likely too short to be accounted for by absorption variability.
  • We report on the results from a large observational campaign on the bare Seyfert galaxy Ark 120, jointly carried out in 2014 with XMM-Newton, Chandra, and NuSTAR. The fortunate line of sight to this source, devoid of any significant absorbing material, provides an incomparably clean view to the nuclear regions of an active galaxy. Here we focus on the analysis of the iron fluorescence features, which form a composite emission pattern in the 6$-$7 keV band. The prominent K$\alpha$ line from neutral iron at 6.4 keV is resolved in the Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating spectrum to a full-width at half maximum of 4700$^{+2700}_{-1500}$ km s$^{-1}$, consistent with an origin from the optical broad-line region. Excess components are detected on both sides of the narrow K$\alpha$ line: the red one (6.0$-$6.3 keV) clearly varies in strength in about one year, and hints at the presence of a broad, mildly asymmetric line from the accretion disk; the blue one (6.5$-$7.0 keV), instead, is likely a blend of different contributions, and appears to be constant when integrated over long enough exposures. However, the Fe K excess emission map computed over the 7.5 days of the XMM-Newton monitoring shows that both the red and the blue features are actually highly variable on timescales of $\sim$10$-$15 hours, suggesting that they might arise from short-lived hotspots on the disk surface, located within a few tens of gravitational radii from the central supermassive black hole and possibly illuminated by magnetic reconnection events. Any alternative explanation would still require a highly dynamic, inhomogeneous disk/coronal system, involving clumpiness and/or instability.
  • We present a detailed analysis of a recent $500$ ks net exposure \textit{Suzaku} observation, carried out in 2013, of the nearby ($z=0.184$) luminous (L$_{\rm bol}\sim10^{47}$ erg s$^{-1}$) quasar PDS 456 in which the X-ray flux was unusually low. The short term X-ray spectral variability has been interpreted in terms of variable absorption and/or intrinsic continuum changes. In the former scenario, the spectral variability is due to variable covering factors of two regions of partially covering absorbers. We find that these absorbers are characterised by an outflow velocity comparable to that of the highly ionised wind, i.e. $\sim0.25$ c, at the $99.9\%$ $(3.26\sigma)$ confidence level. This suggests that the partially absorbing clouds may be the denser clumpy part of the inhomogeneous wind. Following an obscuration event we obtained a direct estimate of the size of the X-ray emitting region, to be not larger than $20~R_{\rm g}$ in PDS 456.
  • We present the analysis of a Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the local Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365. The source, well known for its dramatic X-ray spectral variability, was caught in a reflection-dominated, Compton-thick state. The high spatial resolution afforded by Chandra allowed us to isolate the soft X-ray emission from the active nucleus, neglecting most of the contribution from the kpc-scale starburst ring. The HETG spectra thus revealed a wealth of He- and H-like lines from photoionized gas, whereas in larger aperture observations these are almost exclusively produced through collisional ionization in the circumnuclear environment. Once the residual thermal component is accounted for, the emission-line properties of the photoionized region close to the hard X-ray continuum source indicate that NGC 1365 has some similarities to the local population of obscured active galaxies. In spite of the limited overall data quality, several soft X-ray lines seem to have fairly broad profiles (~800-1300 km/s full-width at half maximum), and a range of outflow velocities (up to ~1600 km/s, but possibly reaching a few thousands km/s) appears to be involved. At higher energies, the K$\alpha$ fluorescence line from neutral iron is resolved with > 99 per cent confidence, and its width of ~3000 km/s points to an origin from the same broad-line region clouds responsible for eclipsing the X-ray source and likely shielding the narrow-line region.
  • Ongoing studies with XMM-Newton have shown that powerful accretion disc winds, as revealed through highly-ionised Fe\,K-shell absorption at E>=6.7 keV, are present in a significant fraction of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the local Universe (Tombesi et al. 2010). In Gofford et al. (2013) we analysed a sample of 51 Suzaku-observed AGN and independently detected Fe K absorption in ~40% of the sample, and we measured the properties of the absorbing gas. In this work we build upon these results to consider the properties of the associated wind. On average, the fast winds (v_out>0.01c) are located <r>~10^{15-18} cm (typically ~10^{2-4} r_s) from their black hole, their mass outflow rates are of the order <M_out>~0.01-1 Msun/yr or ~(0.01-1) M_edd and kinetic power is constrained to <L_k> ~10^{43-45} erg/s, equivalent to ~(0.1-10%) L_edd. We find a fundamental correlation between the source bolometric luminosity and the wind velocity, with v_out \propto L_bol^{\alpha} and \alpha=0.4^{+0.3}_{-0.2}$ (90% confidence), which indicates that more luminous AGN tend to harbour faster Fe K winds. The mass outflow rate M_out, kinetic power L_k and momentum flux P_out of the winds are also consequently correlated with L_bol, such that more massive and more energetic winds are present in more luminous AGN. We investigate these properties in the framework of a continuum-driven wind, showing that the observed relationships are broadly consistent with a wind being accelerated by continuum-scattering. We find that, globally, a significant fraction (~85%) of the sample can plausibly exceed the L_k/L_bol~0.5% threshold thought necessary for feedback, while 45% may also exceed the less conservative ~5% of L_bol threshold as well. This suggests that the winds may be energetically significant for AGN--host-galaxy feedback processes.
  • The evolution of galaxies is connected to the growth of supermassive black holes in their centers. During the quasar phase, a huge luminosity is released as matter falls onto the black hole, and radiation-driven winds can transfer most of this energy back to the host galaxy. Over five different epochs, we detected the signatures of a nearly spherical stream of highly ionized gas in the broadband X-ray spectra of the luminous quasar PDS 456. This persistent wind is expelled at relativistic speeds from the inner accretion disk, and its wide aperture suggests an effective coupling with the ambient gas. The outflow's kinetic power larger than 10^46 ergs per second is enough to provide the feedback required by models of black hole and host galaxy co-evolution.
  • Ark 564 (z=0.0247) is an X-ray-bright NLS1. By using advanced X-ray timing techniques, an excess of "delayed" emission in the hard X-ray band (4-7.5 keV) following about 1000 seconds after "flaring" light in the soft X-ray band (0.4-1 keV) was recently detected. We report on the X-ray spectral analysis of eight XMM-Newton and one Suzaku observation of Ark 564. High-resolution spectroscopy was performed with the RGS in the soft X-ray band, while broad-band spectroscopy was performed with the EPIC-pn and XIS/PIN instruments. We analysed time-averaged, flux-selected, and time-resolved spectra. Despite the strong variability in flux during our observational campaign, the broad-band spectral shape of Ark 564 does not vary dramatically and can be reproduced either by a superposition of a power law and a blackbody emission or by a Comptonized power-law emission model. High-resolution spectroscopy revealed ionised gas along the line of sight at the systemic redshift of the source, with a low column density and a range of ionisation states. Broad-band spectroscopy revealed a very steep intrinsic continuum and a rather weak emission feature in the iron K band; modelling this feature with a reflection component requires highly ionised gas. A reflection-dominated or an absorption-dominated model are similarly able to well reproduce the time-averaged data from a statistical point of view, in both cases requiring contrived geometries and/or unlikely physical parameters. Finally, through time-resolved analysis we spectroscopically identified the "delayed" emission as a spectral hardening above ~4 keV; the most likely interpretation for this component is a reprocessing of the "flaring" light by gas located at 10-100 r_g from the central supermassive black hole that is so hot that it can Compton-upscatter the flaring intrinsic continuum emission.
  • We report on a comprehensive X-ray spectral analysis of the nearby radio-quiet quasar MR 2251-178, based on the long-look (~ 400 ks) XMM-Newton observation carried out in November 2011. As the properties of the multiphase warm absorber (thoroughly discussed in a recent, complementary work) hint at a steep photoionizing continuum, here we investigate into the nature of the intrinsic X-ray emission of MR 2251-178 by testing several physical models. The apparent 2-10 keV flatness as well as the subtle broadband curvature can be ascribed to partial covering of the X-ray source by a cold, clumpy absorption system with column densities ranging from a fraction to several x10^23 cm^-2. As opposed to more complex configurations, only one cloud is required along the line of sight in the presence of a soft X-ray excess, possibly arising as Comptonized disc emission in the accretion disc atmosphere. On statistical grounds, even reflection with standard efficiency off the surface of the inner disc cannot be ruled out, although this tentatively overpredicts the observed ~ 14-150 keV emission. It is thus possible that each of the examined physical processes is relevant to a certain degree, and hence only a combination of high-quality, simultaneous broadband spectral coverage and multi-epoch monitoring of X-ray spectral variability could help disentangling the different contributions. Yet, regardless of the model adopted, we infer for MR 2251-178 a bolometric luminosity of ~ 5-7 x 10^45 erg/s, implying that the central black hole is accreting at ~ 15-25 per cent of the Eddington limit.
  • We present a comparison of two Suzaku X-ray observations of the nearby (z=0.184), luminous ($L_{bol} \sim 10^{47}$ erg s$^{-1}$) type I quasar, PDS456. A new 125ks Suzaku observation in 2011 caught the quasar during a period of low X-ray flux and with a hard X-ray spectrum, in contrast to a previous 190ks Suzaku observation in 2007 when the quasar appeared brighter and had a steep ($\Gamma>2$) X-ray spectrum. The 2011 X-ray spectrum contains a pronounced trough near 9\,keV in the quasar rest frame, which can be modeled with blue-shifted iron K-shell absorption, most likely from the He and H-like transitions of iron. The absorption trough is observed at a similar rest-frame energy as in the earlier 2007 observation, which appears to confirm the existence of a persistent high velocity wind in PDS 456, at an outflow velocity of $0.25-0.30$c. The spectral variability between 2007 and 2011 can be accounted for by variations in a partial covering absorber, increasing in covering fraction from the brighter 2007 observation to the hard and faint 2011 observation. Overall the low flux 2011 observation can be explained if PDS 456 is observed at relatively low inclination angles through a Compton thick wind, originating from the accretion disk, which significantly attenuates the X-ray flux from the quasar.
  • Recent evidence for a strong 'hard excess' of flux at energies > 20 keV in some Suzaku observations of type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) has motivated an exploratory study of the phenomenon in the local type 1 AGN population. We have selected all type 1 AGN in the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) 58-month catalog and cross-correlated them with the holdings of the Suzaku public archive. We find the hard excess phenomenon to be a ubiquitous property of type 1 AGN. Taken together, the spectral hardness and equivalent width of Fe K alpha emission are consistent with reprocessing by an ensemble of Compton-thick clouds that partially cover the continuum source. In the context of such a model, ~ 80 % of the sample has a hardness ratio consistent with > 50% covering of the continuum by low-ionization, Compton-thick gas. More detailed study of the three hardest X-ray spectra in our sample reveal a sharp Fe K absorption edge at ~ 7 keV in each of them, indicating that blurred reflection is not responsible for the very hard spectral forms. Simple considerations place the distribution of Compton-thick clouds at or within the optical broad line region.
  • We present the results of the Suzaku observation of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4507. This source is one of the X-ray brightest Compton-thin Seyfert 2s and a candidate for a variable absorber. Suzaku caught NGC 4507 in a highly absorbed state characterised by a high column density (NH \sim8 x10^23 cm^-2), a strong reflected component (R\sim 1.9) and a high equivalent width Fe K alpha emission line (EW\sim 500 eV). The Fe K alpha emission line is unresolved at the resolution of the Suzaku CCDs (sigma < 30 eV or FWHM < 3000 km s^-1) and most likely originates in a distant absorber. The Fe K beta emission line is also clearly detected and its intensity is marginally higher than the theoretical value for low ionisation Fe. A comparison with previous observations performed with XMM-Newton and BeppoSAX reveals that the X-ray spectral curvature changes on a timescale of a few months. We analysed all these historical observations, with standard models as well as with a most recent model for a toroidal reprocessor and found that the main driver of the observed 2-10 keV spectral variability is a change of the line-of-sight obscuration, varying from \sim4x10^23 cm^-2 to \sim9 x 10^23 cm^-2. The primary continuum is also variable, although its photon index does not appear to vary, while the Fe K alpha line and reflection component are consistent with being constant across the observations. This suggests the presence of a rather constant reprocessor and that the observed line of sight NH variability is either due to a certain degree of clumpiness of the putative torus or due to the presence of a second clumpy absorber.
  • The origin of the observed time lags, in nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN), between hard and soft X-ray photons is investigated using new XMM-Newton data for the narrow-line Seyfert I galaxy Ark 564 and existing data for 1H0707-495 and NGC 4051. These AGN have highly variable X-ray light curves that contain frequent, high peaks of emission. The averaged light curve of the peaks is directly measured from the time series, and it is shown that (i) peaks occur at the same time, within the measurement uncertainties, at all X-ray energies, and (ii) there exists a substantial tail of excess emission at hard X-ray energies, which is delayed with respect to the time of the main peak, and is particularly prominent in Ark 564. Observation (i) rules out that the observed lags are caused by Comptonization time delays and disfavors a simple model of propagating fluctuations on the accretion disk. Observation (ii) is consistent with time lags caused by Compton-scattering reverberation from material a few thousand light-seconds from the primary X-ray source. The power spectral density and the frequency-dependent phase lags of the peak light curves are consistent with those of the full time series. There is evidence for non-stationarity in the Ark 564 time series in both the Fourier and peaks analyses. A sharp `negative' lag (variations at hard photon energies lead soft photon energies) observed in Ark 564 appears to be generated by the shape of the hard-band transfer function and does not arise from soft-band reflection of X-rays. These results reinforce the evidence for the existence of X-ray reverberation in type I AGN, which requires that these AGN are significantly affected by scattering from circumnuclear material a few tens or hundreds of gravitational radii in extent.
  • We construct full broadband models in an analysis of Suzaku observations of nearby Seyfert 1 AGN (z<0.2) with exposures >50ks and with greater than 30000 counts in order to study their iron line profiles. This results in a sample of 46 objects and 84 observations. After a full modelling of the broadband Suzaku and Swift-BAT data (0.6-100 keV) we find complex warm absorption is present in 59% of the objects in this sample which has a significant bearing upon the derived Fe K region parameters. Meanwhile 35% of the 46 objects require some degree of high column density partial coverer in order to fully model the hard X-ray spectrum. We also find that a large number of the objects in the sample (22%) require high velocity, high ionization outflows in the Fe K region resulting from Fe XXV and Fe XXVI. A further four AGN feature highly ionized Fe K absorbers consistent with zero outflow velocity, making a total of 14/46 (30%) AGN in this sample showing evidence for statistically significant absorption in the Fe K region. Narrow Fe K alpha emission from distant material at 6.4 keV is found to be almost ubiquitous in these AGN. Examining the 6-7 keV Fe K region we note that narrow emission lines originating from Fe XXV at 6.63-6.70 keV and from Fe XXVI at 6.97 keV are present in 52% and 39% of objects respectively. Our results suggest statistically significant relativistic Fe K alpha emission is detected in 23 of 46 objects (50%) at >99.5% confidence, measuring an average emissivity index of q=2.4\pm0.1 and equivalent width EW=96\pm10 eV using the relline model. When parameterised with a Gaussian we find an average line energy of 6.32\pm0.04 keV, sigma width=0.470\pm0.05 keV and EW=97\pm19 eV. Where we can place constraints upon the black hole spin parameter a, we do not require a maximally spinning black hole in all cases.
  • We have modeled a small sample of Seyfert galaxies that were previously identified as having simple X-ray spectra with little intrinsic absorption. The sources in this sample all contain moderately broad components of Fe K-shell emission and are ideal candidates for testing the applicability of a Compton-thick accretion-disk wind model to AGN emission components. Viewing angles through the wind allow the observer to see the absorption signature of the gas, whereas face-on viewing angles allow the observer to see the scattered light from the wind. We find that the Fe K emission line profiles are well described with a model of a Compton-thick accretion-disk wind of solar abundances, arising tens to hundred of gravitational radii from the central black hole. Further, the fits require a neutral component of Fe K alpha emission that is too narrow to arise from the inner part of the wind, and likely comes from a more distant reprocessing region. Our study demonstrates that a Compton-thick wind can have a profound effect on the observed X-ray spectrum of an AGN, even when the system is not viewed through the flow.
  • We are conducting a systematic study of highly-ionised outflows in AGN using archival Suzaku data. To date we have analysed 59 observations of 45 AGN using a combined energy-intensity contour plot and Montecarlo method. We find that ~36% (16/45) of sources analysed so far show largely unambigous signatures (i.e., Montecarlo proabilities of >95%) of highly-ionised, high-velocity absorption troughs in their X-ray spectra. From XSTAR fitting we find that, overall, the properties of the absorbers are very similar to those found recently by Tombesi et al. (2010,2011) with XMM-Newton for the same phenomenon.
  • We present a broad-band analysis of deep Suzaku observations of nearby Seyfert 1 AGN: Fairall 9, MCG--6-30-15, NGC 3516, NGC 3783 and NGC 4051. The use of deep observations (exposures >200 ks) with high S/N allows the complex spectra of these objects to be examined in full, taking into account features such as the soft excess, reflection continuum and complex absorption components. After a self-consistent modelling of the broad-band data (0.6-100.0 keV, also making use of BAT data from Swift), the subtle curvature which may be introduced as a consequence of warm absorbers has a measured affect upon the spectrum at energies >3 keV and the Fe K region. Forming a model (including absorption) of these AGN allows the true extent to which broadened diskline emission is present to be examined and as a result the measurement of accretion disc and black hole parameters which are consistent over the full 0.6-100.0 keV energy range. Fitting relativistic line emission models appear to rule out the presence of maximally spinning black holes in all objects at the 90% confidence level, in particular MCG--6-30-15 at >99.5% confidence. Relativistic Fe K line emission is only marginally required in NGC 3516 and not required in NGC 4051, over the full energy bandpass. Nonetheless, statistically significant broadened 6.4 keV Fe K alpha emission is detected in Fairall 9, MCG--6-30-15 and NGC 3783 yielding black hole spin estimates of a=0.67(+0.10,-0.11), a=0.4(+0.20,-0.12) and a<-0.04 respectively, when fitted with disc emission models.
  • We present the analysis of a new broad-band X-ray spectrum (0.6-180.0 keV) of the radio-quiet quasar MR 2251-178 which uses data obtained with both Suzaku and the Swift/BAT. In accordance with previous observations, we find that the general continuum can be well described by a power-law with {\Gamma}=1.6 and an apparent soft-excess below 1 keV. Warm absorption is clearly present and absorption lines due to the Fe UTA, Fe L (Fe XXIII-XXIV), S XV and S XVI are detected below 3 keV. At higher energies, Fe K absorption from Fe XXV-XXVI is detected and a relatively weak (EW=25[+12,-8] eV) narrow Fe K{\alpha} emission line is observed at E=6.44\pm0.04 keV. The Fe K{\alpha} emission is well modelled by the presence of a mildly ionised ({\xi}\leq30) reflection component with a low reflection fraction (R<0.2). At least 5 ionised absorption components with 10^{20} \leq N_H \leq 10^{23} cm^{-2} and 0 \leq log({\xi})/erg cm s^{-1} \leq 4 are required to achieve an adequate spectral fit. Alternatively, we show that the continuum can also be fit if a {\Gamma}~2.0 power-law is absorbed by a column of N_H~10^{23} cm^{-2} which covers ~30% of the source flux. Independent of which continuum model is adopted, the Fe L and Fe XXV He{\alpha} lines are described by a single absorber outflowing with v_out~0.14 c. Such an outflow/disk wind is likely to be substantially clumped (b~10^{-3}) in order to not vastly exceed the likely accretion rate of the source.
  • We present the results of a deep 300 ks Chandra HETG observation of the highly variable narrow-line Seyfert Type 1 galaxy NGC 4051. The HETG spectrum reveals 28 significant soft X-ray ionised lines in either emission or absorption; primarily originating from H-like and He-like K-shell transitions of O, Ne, Mg and Si (including higher order lines and strong forbidden emission lines from O VII and Ne IX) plus high ionisation L-shell transitions from Fe XVII to Fe XXII and lower ionisation inner-shell lines (e.g. O VI). Modelling the data with XSTAR requires four distinct ionisation zones for the gas, all outflowing with velocities < 1000 km/s. A selection of the strongest emission/absorption lines appear to be resolved with FWHM of ~600 km/s. We also present the results from a quasi-simultaneous 350 ks Suzaku observation of NGC 4051 where the XIS spectrum reveals strong evidence for blueshifted absorption lines at ~6.8 and ~7.1 keV, consistent with previous findings. Modelling with XSTAR suggests that this is the signature of a highly ionised, high velocity outflow (log \xi ~ 4.1; v ~ -0.02c) which potentially may have a significant effect on the host galaxy environment via feedback. Finally, we also simultaneously model the broad-band 2008 XIS+HXD Suzaku data with archival Suzaku data from 2005 when the source was observed to have entered an extended period of low flux in an attempt to analyse the cause of the long-term spectral variability. We find that we can account for this by allowing for large variations in the normalisation of the intrinsic power-law component which may be interpreted as being due to significant changes in the covering fraction of a Compton-thick partial-coverer obscuring the central continuum emission.
  • We present evidence for X-ray line emitting and absorbing gas in the nucleus of the Broad-Line Radio Galaxy (BLRG), 3C 445. A 200ks Chandra LETG observation of 3C 445 reveals the presence of several highly ionized emission lines in the soft X-ray spectrum, primarily from the He and H-like ions of O, Ne, Mg and Si. Radiative recombination emission is detected from O VII and O VIII, indicating that the emitting gas is photoionized. The He-like emission appears to be resolved into forbidden and intercombination line components, which implies a high density of >10^{10} cm^{-3}, while the Oxygen lines are velocity broadened with a mean width of ~2600 km s^{-1} (FWHM). The density and widths of the ionized lines indicate an origin of the gas on sub-parsec scales in the Broad Line Region (BLR).The X-ray continuum of 3C 445 is heavily obscured either by a partial coverer or by a photoionized absorber of column density N_{H}=2x10^{23} cm^{-2} and ionization parameter log(xi)=1.4 erg cm s^{-1}. However the view of the X-ray line emission is unobscured, which requires the absorber to be located at radii well within any parsec scale molecular torus. Instead, we suggest that the X-ray absorber in 3C 445 may be associated with an outflowing, but clumpy, accretion disk wind with an observed outflow velocity of ~10000 km/s.
  • We methodically model the broad-band Suzaku spectra of a small sample of six 'bare' Seyfert galaxies: Ark 120, Fairall 9, MCG-02-14-009, Mrk 335, NGC 7469 and SWIFT J2127.4+5654. The analysis of bare Seyferts allows a consistent and physical modelling of AGN due to a weak amount of any intrinsic warm absorption, removing the degeneracy between the spectral curvature due to warm absorption and the red-wing of the Fe K region. Through effective modelling of the broad-band spectrum and investigating the presence of narrow neutral or ionized emission lines and reflection from distant material, we obtain an accurate and detailed description of the Fe K line region using models such as laor, kerrdisk and kerrconv. Results suggest that ionized emission lines at 6.7 keV and 6.97 keV (particularly Fe XXVI) are relatively common and the inclusion of these lines can greatly affect the parameters obtained with relativistic models i.e. spin, emissivity, inner radius of emission and inclination. Moderately broad components are found in all objects, but typically the emission originates from tens of Rg, rather than within <6Rg of the black hole. Results obtained with kerrdisk line profiles suggest an average emissivity of q~2.3 at intermediate spin values with all objects ruling out the presence of a maximally spinning black hole at the 90% confidence level. We also present new spin constraints for Mrk 335 and NGC 7469 with intermediate values of a=0.70(+0.12,-0.01) and a=0.69(+0.09,-0.09) respectively.
  • Highly-ionized fast accretion-disk winds have been suggested as an explanation for a variety of observed absorption and emission features in the X-ray spectra of Active Galactic Nuclei. Simple estimates have suggested that these flows may be massive enough to carry away a significant fraction of the accretion energy and could be involved in creating the link between supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. However, testing these hypotheses, and quantifying the outflow signatures, requires high-quality theoretical spectra for comparison with observations. Here we describe extensions of our Monte Carlo radiative transfer code that allow us to generate realistic theoretical spectra for a much wider variety of disk wind models than possible in our previous work. In particular, we have expanded the range of atomic physics simulated by the code so that L- and M-shell ions can now be included. We have also substantially improved our treatment of both ionization and radiative heating such that we are now able to compute spectra for outflows containing far more diverse plasma conditions. We present example calculations that illustrate the variety of spectral features predicted by parametrized outflow models and demonstrate their applicability to the interpretation of data by comparison with observations of the bright quasar PG1211+143. We find that the major features in the observed 2 - 10 keV spectrum of this object can be well-reproduced by our spectra, confirming that it likely hosts a massive outflow.
  • (Abridged) We present a two month Suzaku X-ray monitoring of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548. The campaign consists of 7 observations. We analyze the response in the opacity of the gas that forms the ionized absorber to ionizing flux variations. Despite variations by a factor of 4 in the impinging continuum, the soft X-ray spectra of the source show little spectral variations, suggesting no response from the ionized absorber. A detailed time modeling confirms the lack of opacity variations for an absorbing component with high ionization. Instead, the models tentatively suggest that the ionization parameter of a low ionization absorbing component might be changing with the ionizing flux, as expected for gas in photoionization equilibrium. Using the lack of variations, we set an upper limit of n_e <2.0E7 cm-3 for the electron density of the gas forming the high ionization, high velocity component. This implies a large distance from the continuum source (R > 0.033 pc). If the variations in the low ionization component are real, they imply n_e >9.8E4 cm-3 and R < 3 pc. We discuss our results in terms of two different scenarios: a large scale outflow originating in the inner parts of the accretion disk, or a thermally driven wind originating much farther out. Given the large distance of the wind, the implied mass outflow rate is also large (Mw > 0.08 Maccr). The associated total kinetic energy deployed by the wind in the host galaxy (>1.2E56 erg) can be enough to disrupt the interstellar medium, possibly regulating large scale star formation. The total mass and energy ejected by the wind is still lower than the one required for cosmic feedback, even when extrapolated to quasar luminosities. Such feedback would require that we are observing the wind before it is fully accelerated.
  • We present the results from a combined study of the average X-ray spectral and timing properties of 14 nearby AGN. For 11 of the sources in the sample, we used all the available data from the RXTE archive, which were taken until the end of 2006. There are 7795 RXTE observations in total for these AGN, obtained over a period of ~7-11 years. We extracted their 3-20 keV spectra and fitted them with a simple power-law model, modified by the presence of a Gaussian line (at 6.4 keV) and cold absorption, when necessary. We used these best-fit slopes to estimate the mean spectral slope for each object, while we used results from the literature to estimate the average spectral slope of the three objects without archival, monitorin RXTE data. Our results show that the AGN average spectral slopes are not correlated either with the black hole mass or the characteristic frequencies that were detected in the power spectra.They are positively correlated, though, with the characteristic frequency when normalised to the sources black hole mass. This is similar to the spectral-timing correlation that has been observed in Cyg X-1, but not the same.The AGN spectral-timing correlation can be explained if we assume that the accretion rate determines both the average spectral slope and the characteristic time scales in AGN. The spectrum should steepen and the characteristic frequency should increase, proportionally, with increasing accretion rate. We also provide a quantitative expression between spectral slope and accretion rate. Thermal Comptonisation models are broadly consistent with our result, but only if the ratio of the soft photons' luminosity to the power injected to the hot corona is proportionally related to the accretion rate.