• We investigate the dynamics of mixed-species ion crystals during transport between spatially distinct locations in a linear Paul trap in the diabatic regime. In a general mixed-species crystal, all degrees of freedom along the direction of transport are excited by an accelerating well, so unlike the case of same-species ions, where only the center-of-mass-mode is excited, several degrees of freedom have to be simultaneously controlled by the transport protocol. We design protocols that lead to low final excitations in the diabatic regime using invariant-based inverse-engineering for two different-species ions and also show how to extend this approach to longer mixed-species ion strings. Fast transport of mixed-species ion strings can significantly reduce the time overhead in certain architectures for scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions.
  • We report high-fidelity laser-beam-induced quantum logic gates on magnetic-field-insensitive qubits comprised of hyperfine states in $^{9}$Be$^+$ ions with a memory coherence time of more than 1 s. We demonstrate single-qubit gates with error per gate of $3.8(1)\times 10^{-5}$. By creating a Bell state with a deterministic two-qubit gate, we deduce a gate error of $8(4)\times10^{-4}$. We characterize the errors in our implementation and discuss methods to further reduce imperfections towards values that are compatible with fault-tolerant processing at realistic overhead.
  • Entangled states are a crucial resource for quantum-based technologies such as quantum computers and quantum communication systems (1,2). Exploring new methods for entanglement generation is important for diversifying and eventually improving current approaches. Here, we create entanglement in atomic ions by applying laser fields to constrain the evolution to a restricted number of states, in an approach that has become known as "quantum Zeno dynamics" (3-5). With two trapped $^9\rm{Be}^+$ ions, we obtain Bell state fidelities up to $0.990^{+2}_{-5}$, with three ions, a W-state (6) fidelity of $0.910^{+4}_{-7}$ is obtained. Compared to other methods of producing entanglement in trapped ions, this procedure is relatively insensitive to certain imperfections such as fluctuations in laser intensity, laser frequency, and ion-motion frequencies.
  • Precision control over hybrid physical systems at the quantum level is important for the realization of many quantum-based technologies. In the field of quantum information processing (QIP) and quantum networking, various proposals discuss the possibility of hybrid architectures where specific tasks are delegated to the most suitable subsystem. For example, in quantum networks, it may be advantageous to transfer information from a subsystem that has good memory properties to another subsystem that is more efficient at transporting information between nodes in the network. For trapped-ions, a hybrid system formed of different species introduces extra degrees of freedom that can be exploited to expand and refine the control of the system. Ions of different elements have previously been used in QIP experiments for sympathetic cooling, creation of entanglement through dissipation, and quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement of one species with another. Here, we demonstrate an entangling quantum gate between ions of different elements which can serve as an important building block of QIP, quantum networking, precision spectroscopy, metrology, and quantum simulation. A geometric phase gate between a $^9$Be$^+$ ion and a $^{25}$Mg$^+$ ion is realized through an effective spin-spin interaction generated by state-dependent forces induced with laser beams. Combined with single-qubit gates and same-species entangling gates, this mixed-element entangling gate provides a complete set of gates over such a hybrid system for universal QIP. Using a sequence of such gates, we demonstrate a Controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate and a SWAP gate. We further demonstrate the robustness of these gates against thermal excitation and show improved detection in quantum logic spectroscopy (QLS). We also observe a strong violation of a CHSH-type Bell inequality on entangled states composed of different ion species.
  • Entangled states are a key resource in fundamental quantum physics, quantum cryp-tography, and quantum computation [1].To date, controlled unitary interactions applied to a quantum system, so-called "quantum gates", have been the most widely used method to deterministically create entanglement [2]. These processes require high-fidelity state preparation as well as minimizing the decoherence that inevitably arises from coupling between the system and the environment and imperfect control of the system parameters. Here, on the contrary, we combine unitary processes with engineered dissipation to deterministically produce and stabilize an approximate Bell state of two trapped-ion qubits independent of their initial state. While previous works along this line involved the application of sequences of multiple time-dependent gates [3] or generated entanglement of atomic ensembles dissipatively but relied on a measurement record for steady-state entanglement [4], we implement the process in a continuous time-independent fashion, analogous to optical pumping of atomic states. By continuously driving the system towards steady-state, the entanglement is stabilized even in the presence of experimental noise and decoherence. Our demonstration of an entangled steady state of two qubits represents a step towards dissipative state engineering, dissipative quantum computation, and dissipative phase transitions [5-7]. Following this approach, engineered coupling to the environment may be applied to a broad range of experimental systems to achieve desired quantum dynamics or steady states. Indeed, concurrently with this work, an entangled steady state of two superconducting qubits was demonstrated using dissipation [8].
  • We use electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) laser cooling to cool motional modes of a linear ion chain. As a demonstration, we apply EIT cooling on $^{24}Mg^+$ ions to cool the axial modes of a $^9Be^+$ - $^{24}Mg^+$ ion pair and a $^9Be^+$ - $^{24}Mg^+$ - $^{24}Mg^+$ - $^9Be^+$ ion chain, thereby sympathetically cooling the $^{9}$Be$^{+}$ ions. Compared to previous implementations of conventional Raman sideband cooling, we achieve approximately an order-of-magnitude reduction in the duration required to cool the modes to near the ground state and significant reduction in required laser intensity.
  • As experimental platforms for quantum information processing continue to mature, characterization of the quality of unitary gates that can be applied to their quantum bits (qubits) becomes essential. Eventually, the quality must be sufficiently high to support arbitrarily long quantum computations. Randomized benchmarking already provides a platform-independent method for assessing the quality of one-qubit rotations. Here we describe an extension of this method to multi-qubit gates. We provide a platform-independent protocol for evaluating the performance of experimental Clifford unitaries, which form the basis of fault-tolerant quantum computing. We implemented the benchmarking protocol with trapped-ion two-qubit phase gates and one-qubit gates and found an error per random two-qubit Clifford unitary of $0.162 \pm 0.008$, thus setting the first benchmark for such unitaries. By implementing a second set of sequences with an extra two-qubit phase gate at each step, we extracted an error per phase gate of $0.069 \pm 0.017$. We conducted these experiments with movable, sympathetically cooled ions in a multi-zone Paul trap - a system that can in principle be scaled to larger numbers of ions.
  • The ideal (i.e. noninteracting), homogeneous Fermi gas, with its characteristic sharp Fermi surface in the momentum distribution, is a fundamental concept relevant to the behavior of many systems. With trapped Fermi gases of ultracold atoms, one can realize and probe a nearly ideal Fermi gas, however these systems have a nonuniform density due to the confining potential. We show that the effect of the density variation, which typically washes out any semblance of a Fermi surface step in the momentum distribution, can be mitigated by selectively probing atoms near the center of a trapped gas. With this approach, we have directly measured a Fermi surface in momentum space for a nearly ideal gas, where the average density and temperature of the probed portion of the gas can be determined from the location and sharpness of the Fermi surface.
  • Wave-vector resolved radio frequency (rf) spectroscopy data for an ultracold trapped Fermi gas are reported for several couplings at Tc, and extensively analyzed in terms of a pairing-fluctuation theory. We map the evolution of a strongly interacting Fermi gas from the pseudogap phase into a fully gapped molecular Bose gas as a function of the interaction strength, which is marked by a rapid disappearance of a remnant Fermi surface in the single-particle dispersion. We also show that our theory of a pseudogap phase is consistent with a recent experimental observation as well as with Quantum Monte Carlo data of thermodynamic quantities of a unitary Fermi gas above Tc.
  • Ultracold atomic Fermi gases present an opportunity to study strongly interacting Fermi systems in a controlled and uncomplicated setting. The ability to tune attractive interactions has led to the discovery of superfluidity in these systems with an extremely high transition temperature, near T/T_F = 0.2. This superfluidity is the electrically neutral analog of superconductivity; however, superfluidity in atomic Fermi gases occurs in the limit of strong interactions and defies a conventional BCS description. For these strong interactions, it is predicted that the onset of pairing and superfluidity can occur at different temperatures. This gives rise to a pseudogap region where, for a range of temperatures, the system retains some of the characteristics of the superfluid phase, such as a BCS-like dispersion and a partially gapped density of states, but does not exhibit superfluidity. By making two independent measurements: the direct observation of pair condensation in momentum space and a measurement of the single-particle spectral function using an analog to photoemission spectroscopy, we directly probe the pseudogap phase. Our measurements reveal a BCS-like dispersion with back-bending near the Fermi wave vector k_F that persists well above the transition temperature for pair condensation.
  • Many-body fermion systems are important in many branches of physics, including condensed matter, nuclear, and now cold atom physics. In many cases, the interactions between fermions can be approximated by a contact interaction. A recent theoretical advance in the study of these systems is the derivation of a number of exact universal relations that are predicted to be valid for all interaction strengths, temperatures, and spin compositions. These equations, referred to as the Tan relations, relate a microscopic quantity, namely, the amplitude of the high-momentum tail of the fermion momentum distribution, to the thermodynamics of the many-body system. In this work, we provide experimental verification of the Tan relations in a strongly interacting gas of fermionic atoms. Specifically, we measure the fermion momentum distribution using two different techniques, as well as the rf excitation spectrum and determine the effect of interactions on these microscopic probes. We then measure the potential energy and release energy of the trapped gas and test the predicted universal relations.
  • We have produced and detected molecules using a p-wave Feshbach resonance between 40K atoms. We have measured the binding energy and lifetime for these molecules and we find that the binding energy scales approximately linearly with magnetic field near the resonance. The lifetime of bound p-wave molecules is measured to be 1.0 +/- 0.1 ms and 2.3 +/- 0.2 ms for the m_l = +/- 1 and m_l = 0 angular momentum projections, respectively. At magnetic fields above the resonance, we detect quasi-bound molecules whose lifetime is set by the tunneling rate through the centrifugal barrier.
  • Ultracold atom gases provide model systems in which many-body quantum physics phenomena can be studied. Recent experiments on Fermi gases have realized a phase transition to a Fermi superfluid state with strong interparticle interactions. This system is a realization of the BCS-BEC crossover connecting the physics of BCS superconductivity and that of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). While many aspects of this system have been investigated, it has not yet been possible to measure the single-particle excitation spectrum, which is a fundamental property directly predicted by many-body theories. Here we show that the single-particle spectral function of the strongly interacting Fermi gas at T ~ Tc is dramatically altered in a way that is consistent with a large pairing gap. We use photoemission spectroscopy to directly probe the elementary excitations and energy dispersion in the Fermi gas of atoms. In these photoemission experiments, an rf photon ejects an atom from our strongly interacting system via a spin-flip transition to a weakly interacting state. We measure the occupied single-particle density of states for an ultracold Fermi gas of 40-potassium atoms at the cusp of the BCS-BEC crossover and on the BEC side of the crossover, and compare these results to that for a nearly ideal Fermi gas. Our results probe the many-body physics in a way that could be compared to data for high-Tc superconductors. This new measurement technique for ultracold atom gases, like photoemission spectroscopy for electronic materials, directly probes low energy excitations and thus can reveal excitation gaps and/or pseudogaps. Furthermore, this technique can provide an analog to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) for probing anisotropic systems, such as atoms in optical lattice potentials.
  • We present a measurement of the potential energy of an ultracold trapped gas of $^{40}$K atoms in the BCS-BEC crossover and investigate the temperature dependence of this energy at a wide Feshbach resonance, where the gas is in the unitarity limit. In particular, we study the ratio of the potential energy in the region of the unitarity limit to that of a non-interacting gas, and in the T=0 limit we extract the universal many-body parameter $\beta$. We find $\beta = -0.54^{+0.05}_{-0.12}$; this value is consistent with previous measurements using $^{6}$Li atoms and also with recent theory and Monte Carlo calculations. This result demonstrates the universality of ultracold Fermi gases in the strongly interacting regime.