• We present near-IR images, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the WFC3/IR camera, of six passive and massive galaxies at redshift 1.3<z<2.4 (SSFR<10^{-2} Gyr^{-1}; stellar mass M~10^{11} M_{sun}), selected from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS). These images, which have a spatial resolution of ~1.5 kpc, provide the deepest view of the optical rest-frame morphology of such systems to date. We find that the light profile of these galaxies is regular and well described by a Sersic model with index typical of today's spheroids. Their size, however, is generally much smaller than today's early types of similar stellar mass, with four out of six galaxies having r_e ~ 1 kpc or less, in quantitative agreement with previous similar measures made at rest-frame UV wavelengths. The images reach limiting surface brightness mu~26.5 mag arcsec^{-2} in the F160W bandpass; yet, there is no evidence of a faint halo in the galaxies of our sample, even in their stacked image. We also find that these galaxies have very weak "morphological k-correction" between the rest-frame UV (from the ACS z-band), and the rest--frame optical (WFC3 H-band): the Sersic index, physical size and overall morphology are independent or only mildly dependent on the wavelength, within the errors.
  • We investigate the feasibility of high performance scientific computation using cloud computers as an alternative to traditional computational tools. The availability of these large, virtualized pools of compute resources raises the possibility of a new compute paradigm for scientific research with many advantages. For research groups, cloud computing provides convenient access to reliable, high performance clusters and storage, without the need to purchase and maintain sophisticated hardware. For developers, virtualization allows scientific codes to be optimized and pre-installed on machine images, facilitating control over the computational environment. Preliminary tests are presented for serial and parallelized versions of the widely used x-ray spectroscopy and electronic structure code FEFF on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, including CPU and network performance.
  • We present measurements of the normalised redshift-space three-point correlation function (Q_z) of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) main galaxy sample. We have applied our "npt" algorithm to both a volume-limited (36738 galaxies) and magnitude-limited sample (134741 galaxies) of SDSS galaxies, and find consistent results between the two samples, thus confirming the weak luminosity dependence of Q_z recently seen by other authors. We compare our results to other Q_z measurements in the literature and find it to be consistent within the full jack-knife error estimates. However, we find these errors are significantly increased by the presence of the ``Sloan Great Wall'' (at z ~ 0.08) within these two SDSS datasets, which changes the 3-point correlation function (3PCF) by 70% on large scales (s>=10h^-1 Mpc). If we exclude this supercluster, our observed Q_z is in better agreement with that obtained from the 2dFGRS by other authors, thus demonstrating the sensitivity of these higher-order correlation functions to large-scale structures in the Universe. This analysis highlights that the SDSS datasets used here are not ``fair samples'' of the Universe for the estimation of higher-order clustering statistics and larger volumes are required. We study the shape-dependence of Q_z(s,q,theta) as one expects this measurement to depend on scale if the large scale structure in the Universe has grown via gravitational instability from Gaussian initial conditions. On small scales (s <= 6h^-1 Mpc), we see some evidence for shape-dependence in Q_z, but at present our measurements are consistent with a constant within the errors (Q_z ~ 0.75 +/- 0.05). On scales >10h^-1 Mpc, we see considerable shape-dependence in Q_z.
  • We present the analysis of the deepest near-UV image obtained with HST using the WFPC2(F300W) as part of the parallel observations of the Ultra Deep Field campaign. The U-band 10sigma limiting magnitude measured over 0.2 arcsec square is m(AB)=27.5 which is 0.5 magnitudes deeper than that in the HDF-North. We matched the U-band catalog with those in the ACS images taken during the GOODS observations of the CDF-South and obtained photometric-z for 306 matched objects. We find that the UV-selected galaxies span all the major morphological types at 0.2<z_phot<1.2. However, disks are more common at lower redshifts, 0.2<z_phot<0.8. Higher-z objects (0.7<z_phot<1.2) are on average bluer than lower-z and have spectral type typical of starbursts. Their morphologies are compact, peculiar or low surface brightness galaxies. The average half-light radius (rest-frame 1200--1800 A) of the UV-selected galaxies at 0.66<z_ phot<1.5 is 0.26 +- 0.01 arcsec (2.07 +- 0.08 kpc). The UV-selected galaxies are on average fainter (M_B=-18.43+-0.13) than Lyman Break Galaxies (M_B=-23+-1). Our sample includes early-type galaxies that are presumably massive and forming stars only in their cores, as well as starburst-type systems that are more similar to the LBGs, although much less luminous. This implies that even the starbursts in our sample are either much less massive than LBGs or are forming stars at a much lower rate or both. The low surface brightness galaxies have no overlap with the LBGs and form an interesting new class of their own.
  • We present the imaging observations made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph of the Hubble Deep Field - South. The field was imaged in 4 bandpasses: a clear CCD bandpass for 156 ksec, a long-pass filter for 22-25 ksec per pixel typical exposure, a near-UV bandpass for 23 ksec, and a far-UV bandpass for 52 ksec. The clear visible image is the deepest observation ever made in the UV-optical wavelength region, reaching a 10 sigma AB magnitude of 29.4 for an object of area 0.2 square arcseconds. The field contains QSO J2233-606, the target of the STIS spectroscopy, and extends 50"x50" for the visible images, and 25"x25" for the ultraviolet images. We present the images, catalog of objects, and galaxy counts obtained in the field.
  • An echelle spectrogram (R = 30,000) of the 2300-3100 A region in the ultraviolet spectrum of the F8V star 9 Comae is presented. The observation is used to calibrate features in the mid-ultraviolet spectra of similar stars according to age and metal content. In particular, the spectral break at 2640 A is interpreted using the spectral synthesis code SYNSPEC. We use this feature to estimate the time since the last major star formation episode in the z=1.55 early-type galaxy LBDS 53W091, whose rest frame mid-ultraviolet spectrum, observed with the Keck Telescope, is dominated by the flux from similar stars that are at or near the main-sequence turnoff in that system (Spinrad et al. 1997). Our result, 1 Gyr if the flux-dominating stellar population has a metallicity twice solar, or 2 Gyr for a more plausible solar metallicity, is significantly lower than the previous estimate and thereby relaxes constraints on cosmological parameters that were implied by the earlier work.
  • The installation of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) allows for the first time two-dimensional optical and ultraviolet slitless spectroscopy of faint objects from space. The STIS Parallel Survey (SPS) routinely obtains broad band images and slitless spectra of random fields in parallel with HST observations using other instruments. The SPS is designed to study a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena, including the rate of star formation in galaxies at intermediate to high redshift through the detection of emission-line galaxies. We present the first results of the SPS, which demonstrate the capability of STIS slitless spectroscopy to detect and identify high-redshift galaxies.
  • We present an optical and near-infrared survey of galaxies in nearby clusters aimed at determining fundamental quantities of galaxies, such as multivariate luminosity function and color distribution for each Hubble type. The main characteristics of our survey are completeness in absolute magnitude, wide wavelength coverage and faint limiting magnitudes.
  • We present the first determination of the near-infrared K-band luminosity function of field galaxies from a wide field K-selected redshift survey. The best fit Schechter function parameters are $M^* = -23.12 +5log(h)$, $\alpha = -0.91$, and $\phi^* = 1.66 \times 10^{-2} h^3 ~ Mpc^{-3}$. We estimate that systematics are no more than 0.1 mag in $M^*$ and 0.1 in $\alpha$, which is comparable to the statistical errors on this measurement.
  • We present bright galaxy number counts measured with linear detectors in the B, V, I, and K bands in two fields covering nearly 10 square degrees. All of our measurements are consistent with passive evolution models, and do not confirm the steep slope measured in other surveys at bright magnitudes. Throughout the range 16 < B < 19, our B-band counts are consistent with the "high normalization" models proposed to reduce the faint blue galaxy problem. Our K-band counts agree with previous measurements, and have reached a fair sample of the universe in the magnitude range where evolution and K-corrections are well understood.