• Using spectroscopic observations taken for the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS) we report here on the discovery of PCl J1001+0220, a massive proto-cluster located at $z_{spec}\sim4.57$ in the COSMOS field. The proto-cluster was initially detected as a $\sim12\sigma$ overdensity of typical star-forming galaxies in the blind spectroscopic survey of the early universe ($2<z<6$) performed by VUDS. It was further mapped using a new technique developed that statistically combines spectroscopic and photometric redshifts, the latter derived from a recent compilation of deep multi-band imaging. Through various methods, the descendant halo mass of PCl J1001+0220 is estimated to be $\log(M_{h}/M_{\odot})_{z=0}\sim14.5-15$ with a large amount of mass apparently already in place at $z\sim4.57$. Tentative evidence is found for a fractional excess of older and more massive galaxies within the proto-cluster, an observation which suggests the pervasive early onset of vigorous star formation. No evidence is found for the differences in the star formation rates of member and a matched sample of coeval field galaxies either through rest-frame ultraviolet methods or through stacking extremely deep Very Large Array 3 GHz imaging. Additionally, no evidence for pervasive strong active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity is observed. Analysis of Hubble Space Telescope images provides weak evidence for for an elevated incidence of galaxy-galaxy interaction within the proto-cluster. The spectral properties of the two samples are compared, with a definite suppression of Ly$\alpha$ seen in the average member galaxy relative to the coeval field ($f_{esc,Ly\alpha}=1.8^{+0.3}_{-1.7}$% and $4.0^{+1.0}_{-0.8}$%, respectively). This observation along with other lines of evidence leads us to infer the possible presence of a large, cool diffuse medium within the proto-cluster environment evocative of a nascent intracluster medium.
  • We present a 69 arcmin$^2$ ALMA survey at 1.1mm, GOODS-ALMA, matching the deepest HST-WFC3 H-band part of the GOODS-South field. We taper the 0"24 original image with a homogeneous and circular synthesized beam of 0"60 to reduce the number of independent beams - thus reducing the number of purely statistical spurious detections - and optimize the sensitivity to point sources. We extract a catalogue of galaxies purely selected by ALMA and identify sources with and without HST counterparts. ALMA detects 20 sources brighter than 0.7 mJy at 1.1mm in the 0"60 tapered mosaic (rms sensitivity $\sigma \simeq$ 0.18 mJy/beam) with a purity greater than 80%. Among these detections, we identify three sources with no HST nor Spitzer-IRAC counterpart, consistent with the expected number of spurious galaxies from the analysis of the inverted image; their definitive status will require additional investigation. An additional three sources with HST counterparts are detected either at high significance in the higher resolution map, or with different detection-algorithm parameters ensuring a purity greater than 80%. Hence we identify in total 20 robust detections. Our wide contiguous survey allows us to push further in redshift the blind detection of massive galaxies with ALMA with a median redshift of $\bar{z}$ = 2.92 and a median stellar mass of $\overline{M_{\star}}$ = 1.1 $\times 10^{11}$M$_\odot$. Our sample includes 20% HST-dark galaxies (4 out of 20), all detected in the mid-infrared with Spitzer-IRAC. The near-infrared based photometric redshifts of two of them ($z \sim$4.3 and 4.8) suggest that these sources have redshifts $z >$ 4. At least 40% of the ALMA sources host an X-ray AGN, compared to $\sim$14% for other galaxies of similar mass and redshift. The wide area of our ALMA survey provides lower values at the bright end of number counts than single-dish telescopes affected by confusion.
  • We present the study of the dependence of galaxy clustering on luminosity and stellar mass in the redshift range 2$<$z$<$3.5 using 3236 galaxies with robust spectroscopic redshifts from the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS). We measure the two-point real-space correlation function $w_p(r_p)$ for four volume-limited stellar mass and four luminosity, M$_{UV}$ absolute magnitude selected, sub-samples. We find that the scale dependent clustering amplitude $r_0$ significantly increases with increasing luminosity and stellar mass indicating a strong galaxy clustering dependence on these properties. This corresponds to a strong relative bias between these two sub-samples of $\Delta$b/b$^*$=0.43. Fitting a 5-parameter HOD model we find that the most luminous and massive galaxies occupy the most massive dark matter haloes with $\langle$M$_h$$\rangle$ = 10$^{12.30}$ h$^{-1}$ M$_{\odot}$. Similar to the trends observed at lower redshift, the minimum halo mass M$_{min}$ depends on the luminosity and stellar mass of galaxies and grows from M$_{min}$ =10$^{9.73}$ h$^{-1}$M$_{\odot}$ to M$_{min}$=10$^{11.58}$ h$^{-1}$M$_{\odot}$ from the faintest to the brightest among our galaxy sample, respectively. We find the difference between these halo masses to be much more pronounced than is observed for local galaxies of similar properties. Moreover, at z~3, we observe that the masses at which a halo hosts, on average, one satellite and one central galaxy is M$_1$$\approx$4M$_{min}$ over all luminosity ranges, significantly lower than observed at z~0 indicating that the halo satellite occupation increases with redshift. The luminosity and stellar mass dependence is also reflected in the measurements of the large scale galaxy bias, which we model as b$_{g,HOD}$($>$L)=1.92+25.36(L/L$^*$)$^{7.01}$. We conclude our study with measurements of the stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR).
  • (Abridged) The properties of stellar clumps in star forming galaxies and their evolution over the redshift range $2\lesssim z \lesssim 6$ are presented and discussed in the context of the build-up of massive galaxies at early cosmic times. We use HST/ACS images of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts from the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS) to identify clumps within a 20 kpc radius. We find that the population of galaxies with more than one clump is dominated by galaxies with two clumps, representing $\sim21-25$\% of the population, while the fraction of galaxies with 3, or 4 and more, clumps is 8-11 and 7-9\%, respectively. The fraction of clumpy galaxies is in the range $\sim35-55\%$ over $2<z<6$, increasing at higher redshifts, indicating that the fraction of irregular galaxies remains high up to the highest redshifts. The large and bright clumps (M$_{\star}\sim10^9$ up to $\sim10^{10}$M$_\odot$) are found to reside predominantly in galaxies with two clumps. Smaller and lower luminosity clumps ($\log_{10}\left(M_{\star}/\mathrm{M_\odot}\right)<9$) are found in galaxies with three clumps or more. We interpret these results as evidence for two different modes of clump formation working in parallel. The small low luminosity clumps are likely the result of disc fragmentation, with violent disc instabilities (VDI) forming several long-lived clumps in-situ, as suggested from simulations. A fraction of these clumps is also likely coming from minor mergers. The clumps in the dominating population of galaxies with two clumps are significantly more massive and have properties akin to those in merging pairs observed at similar redshifts; they appear as more massive than the most massive clumps observed in VDI numerical simulations.
  • Fast and energetic winds are invoked by galaxy formation models as essential processes in the evolution of galaxies. These outflows can be powered either by star-formation and/or AGN activity, but the relative dominance of the two mechanisms is still under debate. We use spectroscopic stacking analysis to study the properties of the low-ionization phase of the outflow in a sample of 1330 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) and 79 X-ray detected (42<log(L_X)<45 erg/s) Type 2 AGN at 1.7<z<4.6 selected from a compilation of deep optical spectroscopic surveys, mostly zCOSMOS-Deep and VUDS. We measure mean velocity offsets of -150 km/s in the SFGs while in the AGN sample the velocity is much higher (-950 km/s), suggesting that the AGN is boosting the outflow up to velocities that could not be reached only with the star- formation contribution. The sample of X-ray AGN has on average a lower SFR than non-AGN SFGs of similar mass: this, combined with the enhanced outflow velocity in AGN hosts, is consistent with AGN feedback in action. We further divide our sample of AGN into two X-ray luminosity bins: we measure the same velocity offsets in both stacked spectra, at odds with results reported for the highly ionized phase in local AGN, suggesting that the two phases of the outflow may be mixed only up to relatively low velocities, while the highest velocities can be reached only by the highly ionized phase.
  • We present the first study of the evolution of the galaxy luminosity and stellar-mass functions (GLF and GSMF) carried out by the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe the COMMODORE galaxy catalogue selected from Science Verification images. This catalogue is made of $\sim 4\times 10^{6}$ galaxies at $0<z\lesssim1.3$ over a sky area of $\sim155\ {\rm sq. \ deg}$ with ${\it i}$-band limiting magnitude ${\it i}=23\ {\rm mag}$. Such characteristics are unprecedented for galaxy catalogues and they enable us to study the evolution of GLF and GSMF at $0<z<1$ homogeneously with the same statistically-rich data-set and free of cosmic variance effects. The aim of this study is twofold: i) we want to test our method based on the use of photometric-redshift probability density functions against literature results obtained with spectroscopic redshifts; ii) we want to shed light on the way galaxies build up their masses over cosmic time. We find that both the ${\it i}$-band galaxy luminosity and stellar mass functions are characterised by a double-Schechter shape at $z<0.2$. Both functions agree well with those based on spectroscopic redshifts. The DES GSMF agrees especially with those measured for the GAlaxy Mass Assembly and the PRism MUlti-object Survey out to $z\sim1$. At $0.2<z<1$, we find the ${\it i}$-band luminosity and stellar-mass densities respectively to be constant ($\rho_{\rm L}\propto (1+z)^{-0.12\pm0.11}$) and decreasing ($\rho_{\rm Mstar}\propto (1+z)^{-0.5\pm0.1}$) with $z$. This indicates that, while at higher redshift galaxies have less stellar mass, their luminosities do not change substantially because of their younger and brighter stellar populations. Finally, we also find evidence for a top-down mass-dependent evolution of the GSMF.
  • Measurements of the galaxy stellar mass function are crucial to understand the formation of galaxies in the Universe. In a hierarchical clustering paradigm it is plausible that there is a connection between the properties of galaxies and their environments. Evidence for environmental trends has been established in the local Universe. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) provides large photometric datasets that enable further investigation of the assembly of mass. In this study we use ~3.2 million galaxies from the (South Pole Telescope) SPT-East field in the DES science verification (SV) dataset. From grizY photometry we derive galaxy stellar masses and absolute magnitudes, and determine the errors on these properties using Monte-Carlo simulations using the full photometric redshift probability distributions. We compute galaxy environments using a fixed conical aperture for a range of scales. We construct galaxy environment probability distribution functions and investigate the dependence of the environment errors on the aperture parameters. We compute the environment components of the galaxy stellar mass function for the redshift range 0.15<z<1.05. For z<0.75 we find that the fraction of massive galaxies is larger in high density environment than in low density environments. We show that the low density and high density components converge with increasing redshift up to z~1.0 where the shapes of the mass function components are indistinguishable. Our study shows how high density structures build up around massive galaxies through cosmic time.
  • Deep observations are revealing a growing number of young galaxies in the first billion year of cosmic time. Compared to typical galaxies at later times, they show more extreme emission-line properties, higher star formation rates, lower masses, and smaller sizes. However, their faintness precludes studies of their chemical abundances and ionization conditions, strongly limiting our understanding of the physics driving early galaxy build-up and metal enrichment. Here we study a rare population of UV-selected, sub$-L^{*}$(z=3) galaxies at redshift 2.4$<z<$3.5 that exhibit all the rest-frame properties expected from primeval galaxies. These low-mass, highly-compact systems are rapidly-forming galaxies able to double their stellar mass in only few tens million years. They are characterized by very blue UV spectra with weak absorption features and bright nebular emission lines, which imply hard radiation fields from young hot massive stars. Their highly-ionized gas phase has strongly sub-solar carbon and oxygen abundances, with metallicities more than a factor of two lower than that found in typical galaxies of similar mass and star formation rate at $z\lesssim$2.5. These young galaxies reveal an early and short stage in the assembly of their galactic structures and their chemical evolution, a vigorous phase which is likely to be dominated by the effects of gas-rich mergers, accretion of metal-poor gas and strong outflows.
  • We present a multi-wavelength photometric catalog in the COSMOS field as part of the observations by the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). The catalog is based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) observations of the COSMOS field (centered at RA: $10^h00^m28^s$, Dec:$+02^{\circ}12^{\prime}21^{\prime\prime}$). The final catalog has 38671 sources with photometric data in forty two bands from UV to the infrared ($\rm \sim 0.3-8\,\mu m$). This includes broad-band photometry from the HST, CFHT, Subaru, VISTA and Spitzer Space Telescope in the visible, near infrared and infrared bands along with intermediate and narrow-band photometry from Subaru and medium band data from Mayall NEWFIRM. Source detection was conducted in the WFC3 F160W band (at $\rm 1.6\,\mu m$) and photometry is generated using the Template FITting algorithm. We further present a catalog of the physical properties of sources as identified in the HST F160W band and measured from the multi-band photometry by fitting the observed spectral energy distributions of sources against templates.
  • Galaxy interactions are thought to be one of the main triggers of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), especially at high luminosities, where the accreted gas mass during the AGN lifetime is substantial. Evidence for a connection between mergers and AGN, however, remains mixed. Possible triggering mechanisms remain particularly poorly understood for luminous AGN, which are thought to require triggering by major mergers, rather than secular processes. We analyse the host galaxies of a sample of 20 optically and X-ray selected luminous AGN (log($L_{bol}$ [erg/s]) $>$ 45) at z $\sim$ 0.6 using HST WFC3 data in the F160W/H band. 15/20 sources have resolved host galaxies. We create a control sample of mock AGN by matching the AGN host galaxies to a control sample of non-AGN galaxies. Visual signs of disturbances are found in about 25% of sources in both the AGN hosts and control galaxies. Using both visual classification and quantitative morphology measures, we show that the levels of disturbance are not enhanced when compared to a matched control sample. We find no signs that major mergers play a dominant role in triggering AGN at high luminosities, suggesting that minor mergers and secular processes dominate AGN triggering up to the highest AGN luminosities. The upper limit on the enhanced fraction of major mergers is $\leqslant$20%. While major mergers might increase the incidence of (luminous AGN), they are not the prevalent triggering mechanism in the population of unobscured AGN.
  • In this paper we investigate the impact of different star formation histories (SFHs) on the relation between stellar mass M$_{*}$ and star formation rate (SFR) using a sample of galaxies with reliable spectroscopic redshift zspec>2 drawn from the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS). We produce an extensive database of dusty model galaxies, calculated starting from the new library of single stellar population (SSPs) models presented in Cassara' et al. 2013 and weighted by a set of 28 different SFHs based on the Schmidt function, and characterized by different ratios of the gas infall time scale $\tau_{infall}$ to the star formation efficiency $\nu$. The treatment of dust extinction and re-emission has been carried out by means of the radiative transfer calculation. The spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting technique is performed by using GOSSIP+, a tool able to combine both photometric and spectroscopic information to extract the best value of the physical quantities of interest, and to consider the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) attenuation as a free parameter. We find that the main contribution to the scatter observed in the $SFR-M_{*}$ plane is the possibility of choosing between different families of SFHs in the SED fitting procedure, while the redshift range plays a minor role. The majority of the galaxies, at all cosmic times, are best-fit by models with SFHs characterized by a high $\tau_{\rm infall}/\nu$ ratio. We discuss the reliability of the presence of a small percentage of dusty and highly star forming galaxies, in the light of their detection in the FIR.
  • We measure galaxy sizes on a sample of $\sim1200$ galaxies with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts $2 \leq z_{spec} \leq 4.5$ in the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS), representative of star-forming galaxies with $i_\mathrm{AB} \leq 25$. We first derive galaxy sizes applying a classical parametric profile fitting method using GALFIT. We then measure the total pixel area covered by a galaxy above a given surface brightness threshold, which overcomes the difficulty of measuring sizes of galaxies with irregular shapes. We then compare the results obtained for the equivalent circularized radius enclosing 100\% of the measured galaxy light $r_T^{100}$ to those obtained with the effective radius $r_{e,\mathrm{circ}}$ measured with GALFIT. We find that the sizes of galaxies computed with our non-parametric approach span a large range but remain roughly constant on average with a median value $r_T^{100}\sim2.2$ kpc for galaxies with $2<z<4.5$. This is in stark contrast with the strong downward evolution of $r_e$ with increasing redshift, down to sizes of $<1$ kpc at $z\sim4.5$. We analyze the difference and find that parametric fitting of complex, asymmetric, multi-component galaxies is severely underestimating their sizes. By comparing $r_T^{100}$ with physical parameters obtained through SED fitting we find that the star-forming galaxies that are the largest at any redshift are, on average, more massive and more star-forming. We discover that galaxies present more concentrated light profiles as we move towards higher redshifts. We interpret these results as the signature of several, possibly different, evolutionary paths of galaxies in their early stages of assembly, including major and minor merging or star-formation in multiple bright regions. (abridged)
  • The aim of this paper is to investigate spectral and photometric properties of 854 faint ($i_{AB}$<~25 mag) star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2<z<2.5 using the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS) spectroscopic data and deep multi-wavelength photometric data in three extensively studied extragalactic fields (ECDFS, VVDS, COSMOS). These SFGs were targeted for spectroscopy based on their photometric redshifts. The VUDS spectra are used to measure the UV spectral slopes ($\beta$) as well as Ly$\alpha$ equivalent widths (EW). On average, the spectroscopically measured $\beta$ (-1.36$\pm$0.02), is comparable to the photometrically measured $\beta$ (-1.32$\pm$0.02), and has smaller measurement uncertainties. The positive correlation of $\beta$ with the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED)-based measurement of dust extinction, E$_{\rm s}$(B-V), emphasizes the importance of $\beta$ as an alternative dust indicator at high redshifts. To make a proper comparison, we divide these SFGs into three subgroups based on their rest-frame Ly$\alpha$ EW: SFGs with no Ly$\alpha$ emission (SFG$_{\rm N}$; EW$\le$0\AA), SFGs with Ly$\alpha$ emission (SFG$_{\rm L}$; EW$>$0\AA), and Ly$\alpha$ emitters (LAEs; EW$\ge$20\AA). The fraction of LAEs at these redshifts is $\sim$10%, which is consistent with previous observations. We compared best-fit SED-estimated stellar parameters of the SFG$_{\rm N}$, SFG$_{\rm L}$ and LAE samples. For the luminosities probed here ($\sim$L$^*$), we find that galaxies with and without Ly$\alpha$ in emission have small but significant differences in their SED-based properties. We find that LAEs have less dust, and lower star-formation rates (SFR) compared to non-LAEs. We also find that LAEs are less massive compared to non-LAEs, though the difference is smaller and less significant compared to the SFR and E$_{\rm s}$(B-V). [abridged]
  • The Lyman continuum (LyC) flux escaping from high-z galaxies into the IGM is a fundamental quantity to understand the physical processes involved in the reionization epoch. We have investigated a sample of star-forming galaxies at z~3.3 in order to search for possible detections of LyC photons escaping from galaxy halos. UV deep imaging in the COSMOS field obtained with the prime focus camera LBC at the LBT telescope was used together with a catalog of spectroscopic redshifts obtained by the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS) to build a sample of 45 galaxies at z~3.3 with L>0.5L*. We obtained deep LBC images of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the interval 3.27<z<3.40 both in the R and deep U bands. A sub-sample of 10 galaxies apparently shows escape fractions>28% but a detailed analysis of their properties reveals that, with the exception of two marginal detections (S/N~2) in the U band, all the other 8 galaxies are most likely contaminated by the UV flux of low-z interlopers located close to the high-z targets. The average escape fraction derived from the stacking of the cleaned sample was constrained to fesc_rel<2%. The implied HI photo-ionization rate is a factor two lower than that needed to keep the IGM ionized at z~3, as observed in the Lyman forest of high-z QSO spectra or by the proximity effect. These results support a scenario where high redshift, relatively bright (L>0.5L*) star-forming galaxies alone are unable to sustain the level of ionization observed in the cosmic IGM at z~3. Star-forming galaxies at higher redshift and at fainter luminosities (L<<L*) can be the major contributors to the reionization of the Universe only if their physical properties are subject to rapid changes from z~3 to z~6-10. Alternatively, ionizing sources could be discovered looking for fainter sources among the AGN population at high-z.
  • We combine a deep 0.5~deg$^2$, 1.4~GHz deep radio survey in the Lockman Hole with infrared and optical data in the same field, including the SERVS and UKIDSS near-infrared surveys, to make the largest study to date of the host galaxies of radio sources with typical radio flux densities $\sim 50 \;\mu$Jy. 87% (1274/1467) of radio sources have identifications in SERVS to $AB\approx 23.1$ at 3.6 or 4.5$\mu$m, and 9% are blended with bright objects (mostly stars), leaving only 4% (59 objects) which are too faint to confidently identify in the near-infrared. We are able to estimate photometric redshifts for 68% of the radio sources. We use mid-infrared diagnostics to show that the source population consists of a mixture of star forming galaxies, rapidly accreting (cold mode) AGN and low accretion rate, hot mode AGN, with neither AGN nor starforming galaxies clearly dominating. We see the breakdown in the $K-z$ relation in faint radio source samples, and show that it is due to radio source populations becoming dominated by sources with radio luminosities $\sim 10^{23}\;{\rm WHz^{-1}}$. At these luminosities, both the star forming galaxies and the cold mode AGN have hosts with stellar luminosities about a factor of two lower than those of hot mode AGN, which continue to reside in only the most massive hosts. We show that out to at least $z\sim 2$, galaxies with stellar masses $>10^{11.5}\, M_{\odot}$ have a radio-loud fraction up to $\sim 30$%. This is consistent with there being a sufficient number of radio sources that radio-mode feedback could play a role in galaxy evolution.
  • We present the public release of the stellar mass catalogs for the GOODS-S and UDS fields obtained using some of the deepest near-IR images available, achieved as part of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) project. We combine the effort from ten different teams, who computed the stellar masses using the same photometry and the same redshifts. Each team adopted their preferred fitting code, assumptions, priors, and parameter grid. The combination of results using the same underlying stellar isochrones reduces the systematics associated with the fitting code and other choices. Thanks to the availability of different estimates, we can test the effect of some specific parameters and assumptions on the stellar mass estimate. The choice of the stellar isochrone library turns out to have the largest effect on the galaxy stellar mass estimates, resulting in the largest distributions around the median value (with a semi interquartile range larger than 0.1 dex). On the other hand, for most galaxies, the stellar mass estimates are relatively insensitive to the different parameterizations of the star formation history. The inclusion of nebular emission in the model spectra does not have a significant impact for the majority of galaxies (less than a factor of 2 for ~80% of the sample). Nevertheless, the stellar mass for the subsample of young galaxies (age < 100 Myr), especially in particular redshift ranges (e.g., 2.2 < z < 2.4, 3.2 < z < 3.6, and 5.5 < z < 6.5), can be seriously overestimated (by up to a factor of 10 for < 20 Myr sources) if nebular contribution is ignored.
  • The relation between the galaxy stellar mass M_star and the dark matter halo mass M_h gives important information on the efficiency in forming stars and assembling stellar mass in galaxies. We present the stellar mass to halo mass ratio (SMHR) measurements at redshifts 2<z<5, obtained from the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey. We use halo occupation distribution (HOD) modelling of clustering measurements on ~3000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts to derive the dark matter halo mass M_h, and SED fitting over a large set of multi-wavelength data to derive the stellar mass M_star and compute the SMHR=M_star/M_h. We find that the SMHR ranges from 1% to 2.5% for galaxies with M_star=1.3x10^9 M_sun to M_star=7.4x10^9 M_sun in DM halos with M_h=1.3x10^{11} M_sun} to M_h=3x10^{11} M_sun. We derive the integrated star formation efficiency (ISFE) of these galaxies and find that the star formation efficiency is a moderate 6-9% for lower mass galaxies while it is relatively high at 16% for galaxies with the median stellar mass of the sample ~7x10^9 M_sun. The lower ISFE at lower masses may indicate that some efficient means of suppressing star formation is at work (like SNe feedback), while the high ISFE for the average galaxy at z~3 is indicating that these galaxies are efficiently building-up their stellar mass at a key epoch in the mass assembly process. We further infer that the average mass galaxy at z~3 will start experiencing star formation quenching within a few hundred millions years.
  • We study the evolution of the star formation rate (SFR) - stellar mass (M_star) relation and specific star formation rate (sSFR) of star forming galaxies (SFGs) since a redshift z~5.5 using 2435 (4531) galaxies with highly reliable (reliable) spectroscopic redshifts in the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS). It is the first time that these relations can be followed over such a large redshift range from a single homogeneously selected sample of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. The log(SFR) - log(M_star) relation for SFGs remains roughly linear all the way up to z=5 but the SFR steadily increases at fixed mass with increasing redshift. We find that for stellar masses M_star>3.2 x 10^9 M_sun the SFR increases by a factor ~13 between z=0.4 and z=2.3. We extend this relation up to z=5, finding an additional increase in SFR by a factor 1.7 from z=2.3 to z=4.8 for masses M_star > 10^10 M_sun. We observe a turn-off in the SFR-M_star relation at the highest mass end up to a redshift z~3.5. We interpret this turn-off as the signature of a strong on-going quenching mechanism and rapid mass growth. The sSFR increases strongly up to z~2 but it grows much less rapidly in 2<z<5. We find that the shape of the sSFR evolution is not well reproduced by cold gas accretion-driven models or the latest hydrodynamical models. Below z~2 these models have a flatter evolution (1+z)^{Phi} with Phi=2-2.25 compared to the data which evolves more rapidly with Phi=2.8+-0.2. Above z~2, the reverse is happening with the data evolving more slowly with Phi=1.2+-0.1. The observed sSFR evolution over a large redshift range 0<z<5 and our finding of a non linear main sequence at high mass both indicate that the evolution of SFR and M_star is not solely driven by gas accretion. The results presented in this paper emphasize the need to invoke a more complex mix of physical processes {abridge}
  • We investigate the evolution of galaxy clustering for galaxies in the redshift range 2.0<$z$<5.0 using the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS). We present the projected (real-space) two-point correlation function $w_p(r_p)$ measured by using 3022 galaxies with robust spectroscopic redshifts in two independent fields (COSMOS and VVDS-02h) covering in total 0.8 deg$^2$. We quantify how the scale dependent clustering amplitude $r_0$ changes with redshift making use of mock samples to evaluate and correct the survey selection function. Using a power-law model $\xi(r) = (r/r_0)^{-\gamma}$ we find that the correlation function for the general population is best fit by a model with a clustering length $r_0$=3.95$^{+0.48}_{-0.54}$ h$^{-1}$Mpc and slope $\gamma$=1.8$^{+0.02}_{-0.06}$ at $z$~2.5, $r_0$=4.35$\pm$0.60 h$^{-1}$Mpc and $\gamma$=1.6$^{+0.12}_{-0.13}$ at $z$~3.5. We use these clustering parameters to derive the large-scale linear galaxy bias $b_L^{PL}$, between galaxies and dark matter. We find $b_L^{PL}$ = 2.68$\pm$0.22 at redshift $z$~3 (assuming $\sigma_8$ = 0.8), significantly higher than found at intermediate and low redshifts. We fit an HOD model to the data and we obtain that the average halo mass at redshift $z$~3 is $M_h$=10$^{11.75\pm0.23}$ h$^{-1}$M$_{\odot}$. From this fit we confirm that the large-scale linear galaxy bias is relatively high at $b_L^{HOD}$ = 2.82$\pm$0.27. Comparing these measurements with similar measurements at lower redshifts we infer that the star-forming population of galaxies at $z$~3 should evolve into the massive and bright ($M_r$<-21.5) galaxy population which typically occupy haloes of mass $\langle M_h\rangle$ = 10$^{13.9}$ h$^{-1}$ $M_{\odot}$ at redshift $z$=0.
  • (arXiv abridged abstract) The observed UV rest-frame spectra of distant galaxies are the result of their intrinsic emission combined with absorption along the line of sight produced by the inter-galactic medium (IGM). Here we analyse the evolution of the mean IGM transmission Tr(Ly_alpha) and its dispersion along the line of sight for 2127 galaxies with 2.5<z<5.5 in the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS). We fit model spectra combined with a range of IGM transmission to the galaxy spectra using the spectral fitting algorithm GOSSIP+. We use these fits to derive the mean IGM transmission towards each galaxy for several redshift slices from z=2.5 to z=5.5. We find that the mean IGM transmission defined as Tr(Ly_alpha)=e^{-tau} (with tau the HI optical depth) is 79%, 69%, 59%, 55% and 46% at redshifts 2.75, 3,22, 3.70, 4.23, 4.77, respectively. We compare these results to measurements obtained from quasars lines of sight and find that the IGM transmission towards galaxies is in excellent agreement with quasar values up to redshift z~4. We find tentative evidence for a higher IGM transmission at z>= 4 compared to results from QSOs, but a degeneracy between dust extinction and IGM prevents to draw firm conclusions if the internal dust extinction for star-forming galaxies at z>4 takes a mean value significantly in excess of E(B-V)>0.15. Most importantly, we find a large dispersion of IGM transmission along the lines of sight towards distant galaxies with 68% of the distribution within 10 to 17% of the median value in delta z=0.5 bins, similar to what is found on the LOS towards QSOs. We demonstrate the importance of taking into account this large range of IGM transmission when selecting high redshift galaxies based on their colour properties (e.g. LBG or photometric redshift selection) or otherwise face a significant incompleteness in selecting high redshift galaxy populations.
  • We present the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS), an 18 square degrees medium-deep survey at 3.6 and 4.5 microns with the post-cryogenic Spitzer Space Telescope to ~2 microJy (AB=23.1) depth of five highly observed astronomical fields (ELAIS-N1, ELAIS-S1, Lockman Hole, Chandra Deep Field South and XMM-LSS). SERVS is designed to enable the study of galaxy evolution as a function of environment from z~5 to the present day, and is the first extragalactic survey both large enough and deep enough to put rare objects such as luminous quasars and galaxy clusters at z>1 into their cosmological context. SERVS is designed to overlap with several key surveys at optical, near- through far-infrared, submillimeter and radio wavelengths to provide an unprecedented view of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies. In this paper, we discuss the SERVS survey design, the data processing flow from image reduction and mosaicing to catalogs, as well as coverage of ancillary data from other surveys in the SERVS fields. We also highlight a variety of early science results from the survey.
  • With the NEOWISE portion of the \emph{Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} (WISE) project, we have carried out a highly uniform survey of the near-Earth object (NEO) population at thermal infrared wavelengths ranging from 3 to 22 $\mu$m, allowing us to refine estimates of their numbers, sizes, and albedos. The NEOWISE survey detected NEOs the same way whether they were previously known or not, subject to the availability of ground-based follow-up observations, resulting in the discovery of more than 130 new NEOs. The survey's uniformity in sensitivity, observing cadence, and image quality have permitted extrapolation of the 428 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) detected by NEOWISE during the fully cryogenic portion of the WISE mission to the larger population. We find that there are 981$\pm$19 NEAs larger than 1 km and 20,500$\pm$3000 NEAs larger than 100 m. We show that the Spaceguard goal of detecting 90% of all 1 km NEAs has been met, and that the cumulative size distribution is best represented by a broken power law with a slope of 1.32$\pm$0.14 below 1.5 km. This power law slope produces $\sim13,200\pm$1,900 NEAs with $D>$140 m. Although previous studies predict another break in the cumulative size distribution below $D\sim$50-100 m, resulting in an increase in the number of NEOs in this size range and smaller, we did not detect enough objects to comment on this increase. The overall number for the NEA population between 100-1000 m are lower than previous estimates. The numbers of near-Earth comets will be the subject of future work.
  • Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS) radio sources have been successfully used to select powerful radio sources at high redshifts (z>~2). Typically restricted to large-sky surveys and relatively bright radio flux densities, it has gradually become possible to extend the USS search to sub-mJy levels, thanks to the recent appearance of sensitive low-frequency radio facilities. Here a first detailed analysis of the nature of the faintest USS sources is presented. By using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Very Large Array radio observations of the Lockman Hole at 610 MHz and 1.4 GHz, a sample of 58 USS sources, with 610 MHz integrated fluxes above 100 microJy, is assembled. Deep infrared data at 3.6 and 4.5 micron from the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS) is used to reliably identify counterparts for 48 (83%) of these sources, showing an average total magnitude of [3.6](AB)=19.8 mag. Spectroscopic redshifts for 14 USS sources, together with photometric redshift estimates, improved by the use of the deep SERVS data, for a further 19 objects, show redshifts ranging from z=0.1 to z=2.8, peaking at z~0.6 and tailing off at high redshifts. The remaining 25 USS sources, with no redshift estimate, include the faintest [3.6] magnitudes, with 10 sources undetected at 3.6 and 4.5 micron (typically [3.6]>22-23 mag, from local measurements), which suggests the likely existence of higher redshifts among the sub-mJy USS population. The comparison with the Square Kilometre Array Design Studies Simulated Skies models indicate that Fanaroff-Riley type I radio sources and radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei may constitute the bulk of the faintest USS population, and raises the possibility that the high efficiency of the USS technique for the selection of high redshift sources remains even at the sub-mJy level.
  • We analyze a sample of 23 supermassive elliptical galaxies (central velocity dispersion larger than 330 km s-1), drawn from the SDSS. For each object, we estimate the dynamical mass from the light profile and central velocity dispersion, and compare it with the stellar mass derived from stellar population models. We show that these galaxies are dominated by luminous matter within the radius for which the velocity dispersion is measured. We find that the sizes and stellar masses are tightly correlated, with Re ~ M*^{1.1}$, making the mean density within the de Vaucouleurs radius a steeply declining function of M*: rho_e ~ M*^{-2.2}. These scalings are easily derived from the virial theorem if one recalls that this sample has essentially fixed (but large) sigma_0. In contrast, the mean density within 1 kpc is almost independent of M*, at a value that is in good agreement with recent studies of z ~ 2 galaxies. The fact that the mass within 1 kpc has remained approximately unchanged suggests assembly histories that were dominated by minor mergers -- but we discuss why this is not the unique way to achieve this. Moreover, the total stellar mass of the objects in our sample is typically a factor of ~ 5 larger than that in the high redshift (z ~ 2) sample, an amount which seems difficult to achieve. If our galaxies are the evolved objects of the recent high redshift studies, then we suggest that major mergers were required at z > 1.5, and that minor mergers become the dominant growth mechanism for massive galaxies at z < 1.5.
  • (Abriged) Intranight polarization variability in AGN has not been studied extensively so far. Studying the variability in polarization makes it possibly to distinguish between different emission mechanisms. Thus it can help answering the question if intranight variability in radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN is of the same or of fundamentally different origin. In this paper we investigate intranight polarization variability in AGN. Our sample consists of 28 AGN at low to moderate redshifts (0.048 < z < 1.036), 12 of which are radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) and 16 are radio-loud blazars. The subsample of blazars consists of eight flat-spectrum radio-quasars (FSRQs) and eight BL Lac objects. We find clear differences between the two samples. A majority of the radio-loud AGN show moderate to high degrees of polarization, more than half of them also show variability in polarization. There seems to be a dividing line for polarization intranight variability at P~5 per cent over which all objects vary in polarization. Only two out of 12 radio-quiet quasars show polarized emission, both at levels of P<1 per cent. The lack of polarization intranight variability in radio-quiet AGN points towards accretion instabilities being the cause for intranight flux variability whereas the high duty cycle of polarization variability in radio-loud objects is more likely caused by instabilities in the jet or changes of physical conditions in the jet plasma.