• I. Andreoni, K. Ackley, J. Cooke, A. Acharyya, J. R. Allison, G. E. Anderson, M. C. B. Ashley, D. Baade, M. Bailes, K. Bannister, A. Beardsley, M. S. Bessell, F. Bian, P. A. Bland, M. Boer, T. Booler, A. Brandeker, I. S. Brown, D. Buckley, S.-W. Chang, D. M. Coward, S. Crawford, H.Crisp, B. Crosse, A. Cucchiara, M. Cupák, J. S. de Gois, A. Deller, H. A. R. Devillepoix, D. Dobie, E. Elmer, D. Emrich, W. Farah, T. J. Farrell, T. Franzen, B. M. Gaensler, D. K. Galloway, B. Gendre, T. Giblin, A. Goobar, J. Green, P. J. Hancock, B. A. D. Hartig, E. J. Howell, L. Horsley, A. Hotan, R. M. Howie, L. Hu, Y. Hu, C. W. James, S. Johnston, M. Johnston-Hollitt, D. L. Kaplan, M. Kasliwal, E. F. Keane, D. Kenney, A. Klotz, R. Lau, R. Laugier, E. Lenc, X. Li, E. Liang, C. Lidman, L. C. Luvaul, C. Lynch, B. Ma, D. Macpherson, J. Mao, D. E. McClelland, C. McCully, A. Möller, M. F. Morales, D. Morris, T. Murphy, K. Noysena, C. A. Onken, N. B. Orange, S. Oslowski, D. Pallot, J. Paxman, S. B. Potter, T. Pritchard, W. Raja, R. Ridden-Harper, E. Romero-Colmenero, E. M. Sadler, E. K. Sansom, R. A. Scalzo, B. P. Schmidt, S. M. Scott, N. Seghouani, Z. Shang, R. M. Shannon, L. Shao, M. M. Shara, R. Sharp, M. Sokolowski, J. Sollerman, J. Staff, K. Steele, T. Sun, N. B. Suntzeff, C. Tao, S. Tingay, M. C. Towner, P. Thierry, C. Trott, B. E. Tucker, P. Väisänen, V. Venkatraman Krishnan, M. Walker, L. Wang, X. Wang, R. Wayth, M. Whiting, A. Williams, T. Williams, C. Wolf, C. Wu, X. Wu, J. Yang, X. Yuan, H. Zhang, J. Zhou, H. Zovaro
    Oct. 16, 2017 astro-ph.SR, astro-ph.HE
    The discovery of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave signal has generated follow-up observations by over 50 facilities world-wide, ushering in the new era of multi-messenger astronomy. In this paper, we present follow-up observations of the gravitational wave event GW170817 and its electromagnetic counterpart SSS17a/DLT17ck (IAU label AT2017gfo) by 14 Australian telescopes and partner observatories as part of Australian-based and Australian-led research programs. We report early- to late-time multi-wavelength observations, including optical imaging and spectroscopy, mid-infrared imaging, radio imaging, and searches for fast radio bursts. Our optical spectra reveal that the transient source afterglow cooled from approximately 6400K to 2100K over a 7-day period and produced no significant optical emission lines. The spectral profiles, cooling rate, and photometric light curves are consistent with the expected outburst and subsequent processes of a binary neutron star merger. Star formation in the host galaxy probably ceased at least a Gyr ago, although there is evidence for a galaxy merger. Binary pulsars with short (100 Myr) decay times are therefore unlikely progenitors, but pulsars like PSR B1534+12 with its 2.7 Gyr coalescence time could produce such a merger. The displacement (about 2.2 kpc) of the binary star system from the centre of the main galaxy is not unusual for stars in the host galaxy or stars originating in the merging galaxy, and therefore any constraints on the kick velocity imparted to the progenitor are poor.
  • Merging neutron stars offer an exquisite laboratory for simultaneously studying strong-field gravity and matter in extreme environments. We establish the physical association of an electromagnetic counterpart EM170817 to gravitational waves (GW170817) detected from merging neutron stars. By synthesizing a panchromatic dataset, we demonstrate that merging neutron stars are a long-sought production site forging heavy elements by r-process nucleosynthesis. The weak gamma-rays seen in EM170817 are dissimilar to classical short gamma-ray bursts with ultra-relativistic jets. Instead, we suggest that breakout of a wide-angle, mildly-relativistic cocoon engulfing the jet elegantly explains the low-luminosity gamma-rays, the high-luminosity ultraviolet-optical-infrared and the delayed radio/X-ray emission. We posit that all merging neutron stars may lead to a wide-angle cocoon breakout; sometimes accompanied by a successful jet and sometimes a choked jet.
  • We show that mid-infrared data from the all-sky WISE survey can be used as a robust photometric redshift indicator for powerful radio AGN, in the absence of other spectroscopic or multi-band photometric information. Our work is motivated by a desire to extend the well-known K-z relation for radio galaxies to the wavelength range covered by the all-sky WISE mid-infrared survey. Using the LARGESS radio spectroscopic sample as a training set, and the mid-infrared colour information to classify radio sources, we generate a set of redshift probability distributions for the hosts of high-excitation and low-excitation radio AGN. We test the method using spectroscopic data from several other radio AGN studies, and find good agreement between our WISE-based redshift estimates and published spectroscopic redshifts out to z ~ 1 for galaxies and z ~ 3-4 for radio-loud QSOs. Our chosen method is also compared against other classification methods and found to perform reliably. This technique is likely to be particularly useful in the analysis of upcoming large-area radio surveys with SKA pathfinder telescopes, and our code is publicly available. As a consistency check, we show that our WISE-based redshift estimates for sources in the 843 MHz SUMSS survey reproduce the redshift distribution seen in the CENSORS study up to z ~ 2. We also discuss two specific applications of our technique for current and upcoming radio surveys; an interpretation of large scale HI absorption surveys, and a determination of whether low-frequency peaked spectrum sources lie at high redshift.
  • We report the results of a survey for HI 21-cm absorption at redshifts of z > 2.6 in a new sample of radio sources with the Green Bank and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescopes. From a total of 25 targets, we report zero detections in the 16 for which optical depth limits could be obtained. Based upon the detection rate for z > 0.1 associated absorption, we would expect approximately four detections. Of the 11 which have previously not been searched, there is sufficient source-frame optical/ultra-violet photometry to determine the ionising photon rate for four. Adding these to the literature, the hypothesis that there is a critical rate of logQ = 56 ionising photons per second is now significant at ~7 sigma. This reaffirms our assertion that searching z > 3 active galaxies for which optical redshifts are available selects sources in which the ultra-violet luminosity is sufficient to ionise all of the neutral gas in the host galaxy.
  • We report on a survey for associated HI 21-cm and OH 18-cm absorption with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at redshifts z = 0.2-0.4. Although the low redshift selection ensures that our targets are below the critical ultra-violet luminosity, which is hypothesised to ionise all of the neutral gas in the host galaxy, we do not obtain any detections in the six sources searched. Analysing these in context of the previous surveys, in addition to the anti-correlation with the ultra-violet luminosity (ionising photon rate), we find a correlation between the strength of the absorption and the blue -- near-infrared colour, as well as the radio-band turnover frequency. We believe that these are due to the photo-ionisation of the neutral gas, an obscured sight-line being more conducive to the presence of cold gas and the compact radio emission being better intercepted by the absorbing gas, maximising the flux coverage, respectively. Regarding the photo-ionisation, the compilation of the previous surveys increases the significance of the critical ionising photon rate, above which all of the gas in the host galaxy is hypothesised to be ionised, to >5 sigma. This reaffirms that this is an ubiquitous effect, which has profound implications for the detection of neutral gas in these objects with the Square Kilometre Array.
  • HI absorption studies yield information on both AGN feeding and feedback processes. This AGN activity interacts with the neutral gas in compact radio sources, which are believed to represent the young or recently re-triggered AGN population. We present the results of a survey for HI absorption in a sample of 66 compact radio sources at 0.040 < z < 0.096 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. In total, we obtained seven detections, five of which are new, with a large range of peak optical depths (3% to 87%). Of the detections, 71% exhibit asymmetric, broad ($\Delta{v}_{\mathrm{FWHM}}$ > 100 km s$^{-1}$) features, indicative of disturbed gas kinematics. Such broad, shallow and offset features are also found within low-excitation radio galaxies which is attributed to disturbed circumnuclear gas, consistent with early-type galaxies typically devoid of a gas-rich disk. Comparing mid-infrared colours of our galaxies with HI detections indicates that narrow and deep absorption features are preferentially found in late-type and high-excitation radio galaxies in our sample. These features are attributed to gas in galactic disks. By combining XMM-Newton archival data with 21-cm data, we find support that absorbed X-ray sources may be good tracers of HI content within the host galaxy. This sample extends previous HI surveys in compact radio galaxies to lower radio luminosities and provides a basis for future work exploring the higher redshift universe.
  • Using the Boolardy Engineering Test Array of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP BETA), we have carried out the first $z = 0 - 1$ survey for HI and OH absorption towards the gravitationally lensed quasars PKSB1830$-$211 and MGJ0414$+$0534. Although we detected all previously reported intervening systems towards PKSB1830$-$211, in the case of MGJ0414+0534 three systems were not found, indicating that the original identifications may have been confused with radio frequency interference. Given the sensitivity of our data, we find that our detection yield is consistent with the expected frequency of intervening HI systems estimated from previous surveys for 21-cm emission in nearby galaxies and $z \sim 3$ damped Lyman $\alpha$ absorbers. We find spectral variability in the $z = 0.886$ face-on spiral galaxy towards PKSB1830$-$211, from observations undertaken with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in 1997/1998 and ASKAP BETA in 2014/2015. The HI equivalent width varies by a few per cent over approximately yearly time-scales. This long-term spectral variability is correlated between the north-east and south-west images of the core, and with the total flux density of the source, implying that it is observationally coupled to intrinsic changes in the quasar. The absence of any detectable variability in the ratio of HI associated with the two core images is in stark contrast to the behaviour previously seen in the molecular lines. We therefore infer that coherent opaque HI structures in this galaxy are larger than the parsec-scale molecular clouds found at mm-wavelengths.
  • The star-forming reservoir in the distant Universe can be detected through HI 21-cm absorption arising from either cool gas associated with a radio source or from within a galaxy intervening the sight-line to the continuum source. In order to test whether the nature of the absorber can be predicted from the profile shape, we have compiled and analysed all of the known redshifted (z > 0.1) HI 21-cm absorption profiles. Although between individual spectra there is too much variation to assign a typical spectral profile, we confirm that associated absorption profiles are on average, wider than their intervening counterparts. It is widely hypothesised that this is due to high velocity nuclear gas feeding the central engine, absent in the more quiescent intervening absorbers. Modelling the column density distribution of the mean associated and intervening spectra, we confirm that the additional low optical depth, wide dispersion component, typical of associated absorbers, arises from gas within the inner parsec. With regard to the potential of predicting the absorber type in the absence of optical spectroscopy, we have implemented machine learning techniques to the 55 associated and 43 intervening spectra, with each of the tested models giving a >80% accuracy in the prediction of the absorber type. Given the impracticability of follow-up optical spectroscopy of the large number of 21-cm detections expected from the next generation of large radio telescopes, this could provide a powerful new technique with which to determine the nature of the absorbing galaxy.
  • We present a statistical method for measuring the average HI spin temperature in distant galaxies using the expected detection yields from future wide-field 21cm absorption surveys. As a demonstrative case study we consider a simulated all-southern-sky survey of 2-h per pointing with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder for intervening HI absorbers at intermediate cosmological redshifts between $z = 0.4$ and $1$. For example, if such a survey yielded $1000$ absorbers we would infer a harmonic-mean spin temperature of $\overline{T}_\mathrm{spin} \sim 100$K for the population of damped Lyman $\alpha$ (DLAs) absorbers at these redshifts, indicating that more than $50$ per cent of the neutral gas in these systems is in a cold neutral medium (CNM). Conversely, a lower yield of only 100 detections would imply $\overline{T}_\mathrm{spin} \sim 1000$K and a CNM fraction less than $10$ per cent. We propose that this method can be used to provide independent verification of the spin temperature evolution reported in recent 21cm surveys of known DLAs at high redshift and for measuring the spin temperature at intermediate redshifts below $z \approx 1.7$, where the Lyman-$\alpha$ line is inaccessible using ground-based observatories. Increasingly more sensitive and larger surveys with the Square Kilometre Array should provide stronger statistical constraints on the average spin temperature. However, these will ultimately be limited by the accuracy to which we can determine the HI column density frequency distribution, the covering factor and the redshift distribution of the background radio source population.
  • By combining the data from surveys for HI 21-cm absorption at various impact parameters in near-by galaxies, we report an anti-correlation between the 21-cm absorption strength (velocity integrated optical depth) and the impact parameter. Also, by combining the 21-cm absorption strength with that of the emission, giving the neutral hydrogen column density, we find no evidence that the spin temperature of the gas (degenerate with the covering factor) varies significantly across the disk. This is consistent with the uniformity of spin temperature measured across the Galactic disk. Furthermore, comparison with the Galactic distribution suggests that intervening 21-cm absorption preferentially arises in disks of high inclinations (near face-on). We also investigate the hypothesis that 21-cm absorption is favourably detected towards compact radio sources. Although there is insufficient data to determine whether there is a higher detection rate towards quasar, rather than radio galaxy, sight-lines, the 21-cm detections intervene objects with a mean turnover frequency of 5 x 10^8 Hz, compared to 1 x 10^8 Hz for the non-detections. Since the turnover frequency is anti-correlated with radio source size, this does indicate a preferential bias for detection towards compact background radio sources.
  • The Boolardy Engineering Test Array is a 6 x 12 m dish interferometer and the prototype of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), equipped with the first generation of ASKAP's phased array feed (PAF) receivers. These facilitate rapid wide-area imaging via the deployment of simultaneous multiple beams within a 30 square degree field of view. By cycling the array through 12 interleaved pointing positions and using 9 digitally formed beams we effectively mimic a traditional 1 hour x 108 pointing survey, covering 150 square degrees over 711 - 1015 MHz in 12 hours of observing time. Three such observations were executed over the course of a week. We verify the full bandwidth continuum imaging performance and stability of the system via self-consistency checks and comparisons to existing radio data. The combined three epoch image has arcminute resolution and a 1-sigma thermal noise level of 375 micro-Jy per beam, although the effective noise is a factor 3 higher due to residual sidelobe confusion. From this we derive a catalogue of 3,722 discrete radio components, using the 35 percent fractional bandwidth to measure in-band spectral indices for 1,037 of them. A search for transient events reveals one significantly variable source within the survey area. The survey covers approximately two-thirds of the Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field. This pilot project demonstrates the viability and potential of using PAFs to rapidly and accurately survey the sky at radio wavelengths.
  • We present the results of a survey for intervening 21cm HI absorption in a sample of 10 nearby, gas-rich galaxies selected from the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS). This follows the six HIPASS galaxies searched in previous work and completes our full sample. In this paper we searched for absorption along 17 sightlines with impact parameters between 6 and 46 kpc, making one new detection. We also obtained simultaneous HI emission-line data, allowing us to directly relate the absorption-line detection rate to the HI distribution. From this we find the majority of the non-detections in the current sample are because sightline does not intersect the HI disc of the galaxy at sufficiently high column density, but that source structure is also an important factor. The detected absorption-line arises in the galaxy NGC 5156 ($z = 0.01$) at an impact parameter of 19 kpc. The line is deep and narrow with an integrated optical depth of 0.82 km s$^{-1}$. High resolution Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) images at 5 and 8 GHz reveal that the background source is resolved into two components with a separation of 2.6 arcsec (500 pc at the redshift of the galaxy), with the absorption likely occurring against a single component. We estimate that the ratio of the spin temperature and covering factor, $T_{\mathrm{S}}/f$, is approximately 950 K in the outer disc of NGC 5156, but further observations using VLBI would allow us to accurately measure the covering factor and spin temperature of the gas.
  • We present the results of a survey for HI 21-cm and OH 18-cm absorption in seven strong CO emitters at z > 3. Despite reaching limits comparable to those required to detect 21-cm absorption at lower redshifts, we do not detect either transition in any of the objects searched. We believe that this is due to the high redshift selection causing all of our targets to have ultra-violet luminosities above the critical value, where all of the atomic gas in the host galaxy disk is suspected to be ionised. However, not only are all of our targets bright in CO emission, but detection of CO above the critical UV luminosity is generally not uncommon. This suggests that the molecular gas is shielded from the radiation or is physically remote from the source of the continuum emission, as it appears to be from CO observations of high redshift radio galaxies.
  • We use observations from the Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope to search for transient radio sources in the field around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907. The pulsar is thought to switch between an "off" state in which no emission is detectable, a weak state and a strong state. We ran three independent transient detection pipelines on two-minute snapshot images from a 13 hour BETA observation in order to 1) study the emission from the pulsar, 2) search for other transient emission from elsewhere in the image and 3) to compare the results from the different transient detection pipelines. The pulsar was easily detected as a transient source and, over the course of the observations, it switched into the strong state three times giving a typical timescale between the strong emission states of 3.7 hours. After the first switch it remained in the strong state for almost 40 minutes. The other strong states lasted less than 4 minutes. The second state change was confirmed using observations with the Parkes radio telescope. No other transient events were found and we place constraints on the surface density of such events on these timescales. The high sensitivity Parkes observations enabled us to detect individual bright pulses during the weak state and to study the strong state over a wide observing band. We conclude by showing that future transient surveys with ASKAP will have the potential to probe the intermittent pulsar population.
  • At present neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) gas in galaxies at redshifts above $z \sim 0.3$ (the extent of 21-cm emission surveys in individual galaxies) and below $z \sim 1.7$ (where the Lyman-$\alpha$ line is not observable with ground-based telescopes) has remained largely unexplored. The advent of precursor telescopes to the Square Kilometre Array will allow us to conduct the first systematic radio-selected 21-cm absorption surveys for HI over these redshifts. While HI absorption is a tracer of the reservoir of cold neutral gas in galaxies available for star formation, it can also be used to reveal the extreme kinematics associated with jet-driven neutral outflows in radio-loud active galactic nuclei. Using the six-antenna Boolardy Engineering Test Array of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder, we have demonstrated that in a single frequency tuning we can detect HI absorption over a broad range of redshifts between $z = 0.4$ and $1.0$. As part of our early science and commissioning program, we are now carrying out a search for absorption towards a sample of the brightest GPS and CSS sources in the southern sky. These intrinsically compact sources present us with an opportunity to study the circumunuclear region of recently re-started radio galaxies, in some cases showing direct evidence of mechanical feedback through jet-driven outflows. With the sensitivity of the full ASKAP array we will be able to study the kinematics of atomic gas in a few thousand radio galaxies, testing models of radio jet feedback well beyond the nearby Universe
  • We report the discovery of a new 21-cm HI absorption system using commissioning data from the Boolardy Engineering Test Array of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). Using the 711.5 - 1015.5 MHz band of ASKAP we were able to conduct a blind search for the 21-cm line in a continuous redshift range between $z = 0.4$ and 1.0, which has, until now, remained largely unexplored. The absorption line is detected at $z = 0.44$ towards the GHz-peaked spectrum radio source PKS B1740$-$517 and demonstrates ASKAP's excellent capability for performing a future wide-field survey for HI absorption at these redshifts. Optical spectroscopy and imaging using the Gemini-South telescope indicates that the HI gas is intrinsic to the host galaxy of the radio source. The narrow OIII emission lines show clear double-peaked structure, indicating either large-scale outflow or rotation of the ionized gas. Archival data from the \emph{XMM-Newton} satellite exhibit an absorbed X-ray spectrum that is consistent with a high column density obscuring medium around the active galactic nucleus. The HI absorption profile is complex, with four distinct components ranging in width from 5 to 300 km s$^{-1}$ and fractional depths from 0.2 to 20 per cent. In addition to systemic HI gas, in a circumnuclear disc or ring structure aligned with the radio jet, we find evidence for a possible broad outflow of neutral gas moving at a radial velocity of $v \sim 300$ km s$^{-1}$. We infer that the expanding young radio source ($t_{\rm age} \approx 2500$ yr) is cocooned within a dense medium and may be driving circumnuclear neutral gas in an outflow of $\sim$ 1 $\mathrm{M}_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$.
  • We present HI imaging of the galaxy group IC 1459 carried out with six antennas of the Australian SKA Pathfinder equipped with phased-array feeds. We detect and resolve HI in eleven galaxies down to a column density of $\sim10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$ inside a ~6 deg$^2$ field and with a resolution of ~1 arcmin on the sky and ~8 km/s in velocity. We present HI images, velocity fields and integrated spectra of all detections, and highlight the discovery of three HI clouds -- two in the proximity of the galaxy IC 5270 and one close to NGC 7418. Each cloud has an HI mass of $10^9$ M$_\odot$ and accounts for ~15% of the HI associated with its host galaxy. Available images at ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelengths do not reveal any clear stellar counterpart of any of the clouds, suggesting that they are not gas-rich dwarf neighbours of IC 5270 and NGC 7418. Using Parkes data we find evidence of additional extended, low-column-density HI emission around IC 5270, indicating that the clouds are the tip of the iceberg of a larger system of gas surrounding this galaxy. This result adds to the body of evidence on the presence of intra-group gas within the IC 1459 group. Altogether, the HI found outside galaxies in this group amounts to several times $10^9$ M$_\odot$, at least 10% of the HI contained inside galaxies. This suggests a substantial flow of gas in and out of galaxies during the several billion years of the group's evolution.
  • We present the first detection of HCO$^+$ absorption in the Magellanic System. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), we observed 9 extragalactic radio continuum sources behind the Magellanic System and detected HCO$^+$ absorption towards one source located behind the leading edge of the Magellanic Bridge. The detection is located at LSR velocity of $v=214.0 \pm 0.4\rm\,km\,s^{-1}$, with a full width at half maximum of $\Delta v=4.5\pm 1.0\rm\,km\,s^{-1}$ and optical depth of $\tau(\rm HCO^+)=0.10\pm 0.02$. Although there is abundant neutral hydrogen (HI) surrounding the sightline in position-velocity space, at the exact location of the absorber the HI column density is low, $<10^{20}\rm\,cm^{-2}$, and there is little evidence for dust or CO emission from Planck observations. While the origin and survival of molecules in such a diffuse environment remains unclear, dynamical events such as HI flows and cloud collisions in this interacting system likely play an important role.
  • We present the results of a targeted search for intervening HI absorption in six nearby, gas-rich galaxies using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The sightlines searched have impact parameters of 10-20 kpc. By targeting nearby galaxies we are also able to map their HI emission, allowing us to directly relate the absorption-line detection rate to the extended HI distribution. The continuum sightlines intersect the HI disk in four of the six galaxies, but no intervening absorption was detected. Of these four galaxies, we find that three of the non-detections are the result of the background source being too faint. In the fourth case we find that the ratio of the spin temperature to the covering factor ($T_{\mathrm{S}}/f$) must be much higher than expected ($\gtrsim$5700 K) in order to explain the non-detection. We discuss how the structure of the background continuum sources may have affected the detection rate of HI absorption in our sample, and the possible implications for future surveys. Future work including an expanded sample, and VLBI observations, would allow us to better investigate the expected detection rate, and influence of background source structure, on the results of future surveys.
  • Recent targeted studies of associated HI absorption in radio galaxies are starting to map out the location, and potential cosmological evolution, of the cold gas in the host galaxies of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). The observed 21 cm absorption profiles often show two distinct spectral-line components: narrow, deep lines arising from cold gas in the extended disc of the galaxy, and broad, shallow lines from cold gas close to the AGN (e.g. Morganti et al. 2011). Here, we present results from a targeted search for associated HI absorption in the youngest and most recently-triggered radio AGN in the local universe (Allison et al. 2012b). So far, by using the recently commissioned Australia Telescope Compact Array Broadband Backend (CABB; Wilson et al. 2011), we have detected two new absorbers and one previously-known system. While two of these show both a broad, shallow component and a narrow, deep component (see Fig. 1), one of the new detections has only a single broad, shallow component. Interestingly, the host galaxies of the first two detections are classified as gas-rich spirals, while the latter is an early-type galaxy. These detections were obtained using a spectral-line finding method, based on Bayesian inference, developed for future large-scale absorption surveys (Allison et al. 2012a).
  • Existing studies of the atomic hydrogen gas content in distant galaxies, through the absorption of the 21-cm line, often infer that the total column density is anti-correlated with the linear extent of the background radio source. We investigate this interpretation, by dissecting the various parameters from which the column density is derived, and find that the relationship is driven primarily by the observed optical depth, which, for a given absorber size, is anti-correlated with the linear size. Therefore, the inferred anti-correlation is merely the consequence of geometry, in conjunction with the assumption of a common spin temperature/covering factor ratio for each member of the sample, an assumption for which there is scant observational justification. While geometry can explain the observed correlation, many radio sources comprise two radio lobes and so we model the projected area of a two component emitter intercepted by a foreground absorber. From this, the observed optical depth/linear size relationship is best reproduced through models which approximate either of the two Fanaroff & Riley classifications, although the observed scatter in the sample cannot be duplicated using a single deprojected radio source size. Furthermore, the trend is best reproduced using an absorber of diameter ~100 - 1000 pc, which is also the range of values of linear sizes at which the 21-cm detection rate peaks. This may indicate that this is the characteristic linear size of the absorbing gas structure.
  • We report conclusive verification of the detection of associated HI 21 cm absorption in the early-type host galaxy of the compact radio source PMNJ2054-4242. We estimate an effective spectral line velocity width of 418 +/- 20 km s^{-1} and observed peak optical depth of 2.5 +/- 0.2 per cent, making this one of the broadest and weakest 21 cm absorption lines yet detected. For T_{spin}/f > 100 K the atomic neutral hydrogen column density is N_{HI} > 2 x 10^{21} cm^{-2}. The observed spectral line profile is redshifted by 187 +/- 46 km s^{-1}, with respect to the optical spectroscopic measurement, perhaps indicating that the HI gas is infalling towards the central active galactic nucleus. Our initial tentative detection would likely have been dismissed by visual inspection, and hence its verification here is an excellent test of our spectral line detection technique, currently under development in anticipation of future next-generation 21 cm absorption-line surveys.
  • We present results from a search for 21 cm associated HI absorption in a sample of 29 radio sources selected from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey. Observations were conducted using the Australia Telescope Compact Array Broadband Backend, with which we can simultaneously look for 21 cm absorption in a redshift range of 0.04 < z < 0.08, with a velocity resolution of 7 km/s . In preparation for future large-scale H I absorption surveys we test a spectral-line finding method based on Bayesian inference. We use this to assign significance to our detections and to determine the best-fitting number of spectral-line components. We find that the automated spectral-line search is limited by residuals in the continuum, both from the band-pass calibration and spectral-ripple subtraction, at spectral-line widths of \Deltav_FWHM > 103 km/s . Using this technique we detect two new absorbers and a third, previously known, yielding a 10 per cent detection rate. Of the detections, the spectral-line profiles are consistent with the theory that we are seeing different orientations of the absorbing gas, in both the host galaxy and circumnuclear disc, with respect to our line-of-sight to the source. In order to spatially resolve the spectral-line components in the two new detections, and so verify this conclusion, we require further high-resolution 21 cm observations (~0.01 arcsec) using very long baseline interferometry.
  • The diffuse cm-wave IR-correlated signal, the "anomalous" CMB foreground, is thought to arise in the dust in cirrus clouds. We present Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) cm-wave data of two translucent clouds, {\zeta} Oph and LDN 1780 with the aim of characterising the anomalous emission in the translucent cloud environment. In {\zeta} Oph, the measured brightness at 31 GHz is 2.4{\sigma} higher than an extrapolation from 5 GHz measurements assuming a free-free spectrum on 8 arcmin scales. The SED of this cloud on angular scales of 1{\odot} is dominated by free-free emission in the cm-range. In LDN 1780 we detected a 3 {\sigma} excess in the SED on angular scales of 1{\odot} that can be fitted using a spinning dust model. In this cloud, there is a spatial correlation between the CBI data and IR images, which trace dust. The correlation is better with near-IR templates (IRAS 12 and 25 {\mu}m) than with IRAS 100 {\mu}m, which suggests a very small grain origin for the emission at 31 GHz. We calculated the 31 GHz emissivities in both clouds. They are similar and have intermediate values between that of cirrus clouds and dark clouds. Nevertheless, we found an indication of an inverse relationship between emissivity and column density, which further supports the VSGs origin for the cm-emission since the proportion of big relative to small grains is smaller in diffuse clouds.
  • We present a parameterized model of the intra-cluster medium that is suitable for jointly analysing pointed observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect and X-ray emission in galaxy clusters. The model is based on assumptions of hydrostatic equilibrium, the Navarro, Frenk and White (NFW) model for the dark matter, and a softened power law profile for the gas entropy. We test this entropy-based model against high and low signal-to-noise mock observations of a relaxed and recently-merged cluster from N-body/hydrodynamic simulations, using Bayesian hyper-parameters to optimise the relative statistical weighting of the mock SZ and X-ray data. We find that it accurately reproduces both the global values of the cluster temperature, total mass and gas mass fraction (fgas), as well as the radial dependencies of these quantities outside of the core (r > kpc). For reference we also provide a comparison with results from the single isothermal beta model. We confirm previous results that the single isothermal beta model can result in significant biases in derived cluster properties.