• We present here the characterization of the main properties of a sample of 98 AGN host galaxies, both type-II and type-I, in comparison with those of about 2700 non-active galaxies observed by the MaNGA survey. We found that AGN hosts are morphologically early-type or early-spirals. For a given morphology AGN hosts are, in average, more massive, more compact, more central peaked and rather pressurethan rotational-supported systems. We confirm previous results indicating that AGN hosts are located in the intermediate/transition region between star-forming and non-star-forming galaxies (i.e., the so-called green valley), both in the ColorMagnitude and the star formation main sequence diagrams. Taking into account their relative distribution in terms of the stellar metallicity and oxygen gas abundance and a rough estimation of their molecular gas content, we consider that these galaxies are in the process of halting/quenching the star formation, in an actual transition between both groups. The analysis of the radial distributions of the starformation rate, specific star-formation rate, and molecular gas density shows that the quenching happens from inside-out involving both a decrease of the efficiency of the star formation and a deficit of molecular gas. All the intermediate data-products used to derive the results of our analysis are distributed in a database including the spatial distribution and average properties of the stellar populations and ionized gas, published as a Sloan Digital Sky Survey Value Added Catalog being part of the 14th Data Release: http://www.sdss.org/dr14/manga/manga-data/manga-pipe3d-value-added-catalog/
  • The "kinematic" morphology-density relation for early-type galaxies posits that those galaxies with low angular momentum are preferentially found in the highest-density regions of the universe. We use a large sample of galaxy groups with halo masses 10^12.5 < M_halo < 10^14.5 M_sun/h observed with the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) survey to examine whether there is a correlation between local environment and rotational support that is independent of stellar mass. We find no compelling evidence for a relationship between the angular momentum content of early-type galaxies and either local overdensity or radial position within the group at fixed stellar mass.
  • We describe the algorithm used to select the Emission Line Galaxy (ELG) sample at $z \sim 0.85$ for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV, using photometric data from the DECam Legacy Survey. Our selection is based on a selection box in the $g-r$ vs. $r-z$ colour-colour space and a cut on the $g$-band magnitude, to favour galaxies in the desired redshift range with strong [OII] emission. It provides a target density of 200 deg$^{-2}$ on the North Galactic Cap (NGC) and of 240 deg$^{-2}$ on the South Galactic Cap (SGC), where we use a larger selection box because of deeper imaging. We demonstrate that this selection passes the eBOSS requirements in terms of homogeneity. About 50,000 ELGs have been observed since the observations have started in 2016, September. These roughly match the expected redshift distribution, though the measured efficiency is slightly lower than expected. The efficiency can be increased by enlarging the redshift range and with incoming pipeline improvement. The cosmological forecast based on these first data predict $\sigma_{D_V}/D_V = 0.023$, in agreement with previous forecasts. Lastly, we present the stellar population properties of the ELG SGC sample. Once observations are completed, this sample will be suited to provide a cosmological analysis at $z \sim 0.85$, and will pave the way for the next decade of massive spectroscopic cosmological surveys, which heavily rely on ELGs. The target catalogue over the SGC will be released along with DR14.
  • We present two wide-field catalogs of photometrically-selected emission line galaxies (ELGs) at z=0.8 covering about 2800 deg^2 over the south galactic cap. The catalogs were obtained using a Fisher discriminant technique described in a companion paper. The two catalogs differ by the imaging used to define the Fisher discriminant: the first catalog includes imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, the second also includes information from the South Galactic Cap U-band Sky Survey (SCUSS). Containing respectively 560,045 and 615,601 objects, they represent the largest ELG catalogs available today and were designed for the ELG programme of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS). We study potential sources of systematic variation in the angular distribution of the selected ELGs due to fluctuations of the observational parameters. We model the influence of the observational parameters using a multivariate regression and implement a weighting scheme that allows effective removal of all of the systematic errors induced by the observational parameters. We show that fluctuations in the imaging zero-points of the photometric bands have minor impact on the angular distribution of objects in our catalogs. We compute the angular clustering of both catalogs and show that our weighting procedure effectively removes spurious clustering on large scales. We fit a model to the small scale angular clustering, showing that the selections have similar biases of 1.35/D_a(z) and 1.28/D_a(z). Both catalogs are publicly available.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV extended Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-IV/eBOSS) will observe 195,000 emission-line galaxies (ELGs) to measure the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation standard ruler (BAO) at redshift 0.9. To test different ELG selection algorithms, 9,000 spectra were observed with the SDSS spectrograph as a pilot survey based on data from several imaging surveys. First, using visual inspection and redshift quality flags, we show that the automated spectroscopic redshifts assigned by the pipeline meet the quality requirements for a reliable BAO measurement. We also show the correlations between sky emission, signal-to-noise ratio in the emission lines, and redshift error. Then we provide a detailed description of each target selection algorithm we tested and compare them with the requirements of the eBOSS experiment. As a result, we provide reliable redshift distributions for the different target selection schemes we tested. Finally, we determine an target selection algorithms that is best suited to be applied on DECam photometry because they fulfill the eBOSS survey efficiency requirements.
  • We perform a spectroscopic analysis of 492,450 galaxy spectra from the first two years of observations of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III/Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) collaboration. This data set has been released in the ninth SDSS data release, the first public data release of BOSS spectra. We show that the typical signal-to-noise ratio of BOSS spectra is sufficient to measure stellar velocity dispersion and emission line fluxes for individual objects. The typical velocity dispersion of a BOSS galaxy is 240 km/s, with an accuracy of better than 30 per cent for 93 per cent of BOSS galaxies. The distribution in velocity dispersion is redshift independent between redshifts 0.15 and 0.7, which reflects the survey design targeting massive galaxies with an approximately uniform mass distribution in this redshift interval. The majority of BOSS galaxies lack detectable emission lines. We analyse the emission line properties and present diagnostic diagrams using the emission lines [OII], Hbeta, [OIII], Halpha, and [NII] (detected in about 4 per cent of the galaxies). We show that the emission line properties are strongly redshift dependent and that there is a clear correlation between observed frame colours and emission line properties. Within in the low-z sample around 0.15<z<0.3, half of the emission-line galaxies have LINER-like emission line ratios, followed by Seyfert-AGN dominated spectra, and only a small fraction of a few per cent are purely star forming galaxies. AGN and LINER-like objects, instead, are less prevalent in the high-z sample around 0.4<z<0.7, where more than half of the emission line objects are star forming. This is a pure selection effect caused by the non-detection of weak Hbeta emission lines in the BOSS spectra. Finally, we show that star forming, AGN and emission line free galaxies are well separated in the g-r vs r-i target selection diagram.
  • We obtain constraints on the variation of the fundamental constants from the full shape of the redshift-space correlation function of a sample of luminous galaxies drawn from the Data Release 9 of the Baryonic Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey. We combine this information with data from recent CMB, BAO and H_0 measurements. We focus on possible variations of the fine structure constant \alpha and the electron mass m_e in the early universe, and study the degeneracies between these constants and other cosmological parameters, such as the dark energy equation of state parameter w_DE, the massive neutrinos fraction f_\nu, the effective number of relativistic species N_eff, and the primordial helium abundance Y_He. When only one of the fundamental constants is varied, our final bounds are \alpha / \alpha_0 = 0.9957_{-0.0042}^{+0.0041} and m_e /(m_e)_0 = 1.006_{-0.013}^{+0.014}. For their joint variation, our results are \alpha / \alpha_0 = 0.9901_{-0.0054}^{+0.0055} and m_e /(m_e)_0 = 1.028 +/- 0.019. Although when m_e is allowed to vary our constraints on w_DE are consistent with a cosmological constant, when \alpha is treated as a free parameter we find w_DE = -1.20 +/- 0.13; more than 1 \sigma away from its standard value. When f_\nu and \alpha are allowed to vary simultaneously, we find f_\nu < 0.043 (95% CL), implying a limit of \sum m_\nu < 0.46 eV (95% CL), while for m_e variation, we obtain f_nu < 0.086 (95% CL), which implies \sum m_\nu < 1.1 eV (95% CL). When N_eff or Y_He are considered as free parameters, their simultaneous variation with \alpha provides constraints close to their standard values (when the H_0 prior is not included in the analysis), while when m_e is allowed to vary, their preferred values are significantly higher. In all cases, our results are consistent with no variations of \alpha or m_e at the 1 or 2 \sigma level.
  • We obtain constraints on cosmological parameters from the spherically averaged redshift-space correlation function of the CMASS Data Release 9 (DR9) sample of the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We combine this information with additional data from recent CMB, SN and BAO measurements. Our results show no significant evidence of deviations from the standard flat-Lambda CDM model, whose basic parameters can be specified by Omega_m = 0.285 +- 0.009, 100 Omega_b = 4.59 +- 0.09, n_s = 0.96 +- 0.009, H_0 = 69.4 +- 0.8 km/s/Mpc and sigma_8 = 0.80 +- 0.02. The CMB+CMASS combination sets tight constraints on the curvature of the Universe, with Omega_k = -0.0043 +- 0.0049, and the tensor-to-scalar amplitude ratio, for which we find r < 0.16 at the 95 per cent confidence level (CL). These data show a clear signature of a deviation from scale-invariance also in the presence of tensor modes, with n_s <1 at the 99.7 per cent CL. We derive constraints on the fraction of massive neutrinos of f_nu < 0.049 (95 per cent CL), implying a limit of sum m_nu < 0.51 eV. We find no signature of a deviation from a cosmological constant from the combination of all datasets, with a constraint of w_DE = -1.033 +- 0.073 when this parameter is assumed time-independent, and no evidence of a departure from this value when it is allowed to evolve as w_DE(a) = w_0 + w_a (1 - a). The achieved accuracy on our cosmological constraints is a clear demonstration of the constraining power of current cosmological observations.
  • Astrophysical data analysis of the weak-field predictions support the claim that modified gravity (MOG) theories provide a self-consistent, scale-invariant, universal description of galaxy rotation curves, without the need of non-baryonic dark matter. Comparison to the predictions of Milgrom's modified dynamics (MOND) provide a best-fit and experimentally determined universal value of the MOND acceleration parameter. The predictions of the modified gravity theories are compared to the predictions of cold non-baryonic dark matter (CDM), including a constant density core-modified fitting formula, which produces excellent fits to galaxy rotation curves including the low surface brightness and dwarf galaxies. Upon analysing the mass profiles of clusters of galaxies inferred from X-ray luminosity measurements, from the smallest nearby clusters to the largest of the clusters of galaxies, it is shown that while MOG provides consistent fits, MOND does not fit the observed shape of cluster mass profiles for any value of the MOND acceleration parameter. Comparison to the predictions of CDM confirm that whereas the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) fitting formula does not fit the observed shape of galaxy cluster mass profiles, the core-modified dark matter fitting formula provides excellent best-fits, supporting the hypothesis that baryons are dynamically important in the distribution of dark matter halos.
  • A detailed analysis of the November 15, 2006 data release (Clowe et al., 2006) X-ray surface density Sigma-map and the strong and weak gravitational lensing convergence kappa-map for the Bullet Cluster 1E0657-558 is performed and the results are compared with the predictions of a modified gravity (MOG) and dark matter. Our surface density Sigma-model is computed using a King beta-model density, and a mass profile of the main cluster and an isothermal temperature profile are determined by the MOG. We find that the main cluster thermal profile is nearly isothermal. The MOG prediction of the isothermal temperature of the main cluster is T = 15.5 +- 3.9 keV, in good agreement with the experimental value T = 14.8{+2.0}{-1.7} keV. Excellent fits to the two-dimensional convergence kappa-map data are obtained without non-baryonic dark matter, accounting for the 8-sigma spatial offset between the Sigma-map and the kappa-map reported in Clowe et al. (2006). The MOG prediction for the kappa-map results in two baryonic components distributed across the Bullet Cluster 1E0657-558 with averaged mass-fraction of 83% intracluster medium (ICM) gas and 17% galaxies. Conversely, the Newtonian dark matter kappa-model has on average 76% dark matter (neglecting the indeterminant contribution due to the galaxies) and 24% ICM gas for a baryon to dark matter mass-fraction of 0.32, a statistically significant result when compared to the predicted Lambda-CDM cosmological baryon mass-fraction of 0.176{+0.019}{-0.012} (Spergel et al., 2006).
  • A fully relativistic modified gravitational theory including a fifth force skew symmetric field is fitted to the Pioneer 10/11 anomalous acceleration. The theory allows for a variation with distance scales of the gravitational constant G, the fifth force skew symmetric field coupling strength omega and the mass of the skew symmetric field mu=1/lambda. A fit to the available anomalous acceleration data for the Pioneer 10/11 spacecraft is obtained for a phenomenological representation of the "running" constants and values of the associated parameters are shown to exist that are consistent with fifth force experimental bounds. The fit to the acceleration data is consistent with all current satellite, laser ranging and observations for the inner planets.
  • We apply the modified acceleration law obtained from Einstein gravity coupled explaining galaxy rotation curves without exotic dark matter. Our sample of galaxies includes low surface brightness (LSB) and high surface brightness (HSB) galaxies, and an elliptical galaxy. In those cases where photometric data are available, a best fit via the single parameter (M/L)_{stars} to the luminosity of the gaseous (HI plus He) and luminous stellar disks is obtained. Additionally, a best fit to the rotation curves of galaxies is obtained in terms of a parametric mass distribution (independent of luminosity observations) -- a two parameter fit to the total galactic mass, (or mass-to-light ratio M/L), and a core radius associated with a model of the galaxy cores using a nonlinear least-squares fitting routine including estimated errors. The fits are compared to those obtained using Milgrom's phenomenological MOND model and to the predictions of the Newtonian-Kepler acceleration law.
  • We apply the modified acceleration law obtained from Einstein gravity coupled to a massive skew symmetric field, F_{\mu\nu\lambda}, to the problem of explaining X-ray galaxy cluster masses without exotic dark matter. Utilizing X-ray observations to fit the gas mass profile and temperature profile of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) with King beta-models, we show that the dynamical masses of the galaxy clusters resulting from our modified acceleration law fit the cluster gas masses for our sample of 106 clusters without the need of introducing a non-baryonic dark matter component. We are further able to show for our sample of 106 clusters that the distribution of gas in the ICM as a function of radial distance is well fit by the dynamical mass distribution arising from our modified acceleration law without any additional dark matter component. In previous work, we applied this theory to galaxy rotation curves and demonstrated good fits to our sample of 101 LSB, HSB and dwarf galaxies including 58 galaxies that were fit photometrically with the single parameter (M/L)_{stars}. The results there were qualitatively similar to those obtained using Milgrom's phenomenological MOND model, although the determined galaxy masses were quantitatively different and MOND does not show a return to Keplerian behavior at extragalactic distances. The results here are compared to those obtained using Milgrom's phenomenological MOND model which does not fit the X-ray galaxy cluster masses unless an auxiliary dark matter component is included.