• Magnetohydrodynamic(MHD) turbulence displays anisotropic velocity and density features which reflect the direction of the magnetic field. This anisotropy has led to the development of a number of statistical techniques for studying magnetic fields in the interstellar medium. In this paper, we review and compare three techniques for determining magnetic field strength and morphology that use radio position-position-velocity data: the correlation function anisotropy (CFA), Principal Component Analysis of Anisotropies (PCAA), and the more recent Velocity Gradient Technique (VGT). We compare these three techniques and suggest improvements to the CFA and PCAA techniques to increase their accuracy and versatility. In particular, we suggest and successfully implement a much faster way of calculating non-periodic correlation functions for the CFA. We discuss possible improvements to the current implementation of the PCAA. We show the advantages of the VGT in terms of magnetic field tracing and stress the complementary nature with the other two techniques.
  • In the present study, we investigate the multifractal nature of a long-cadence time series observed by the \textit{Kepler} mission for a sample of 34 M dwarf stars and the Sun in its active phase. Using the Multifractal Detrending Moving Average algorithm (MFDMA), which enables the detection of multifractality in nonstationary time series, we define a set of multifractal indices based on the multifractal spectrum profile as a measure of the level of stellar magnetic activity. This set of indices is given by the ($A$,$\Delta \alpha$,$C$,$H$)-quartet, where $A$, $\Delta \alpha$ and $C$ are related to geometric features from the multifractal spectrum and the global Hurst exponent $H$ describes the global structure and memorability of time series dynamics. As a test, we measure these indices and compare them with a magnetic index defined as $S_{ph}$ and verify the degree of correlation among them. First, we apply the Poincar\'e plot method and find a strong correlation between the $\left\langle S_{ph}\right\rangle$ index and one of the descriptors that emerges from this method. As a result, we find that this index is strongly correlated with long-term features of the signal. From the multifractal perspective, the $\left\langle S_{ph}\right\rangle$ index is also strongly linked to the geometric properties of the multifractal spectrum except for the $H$ index. Furthermore, our results emphasize that the rotation period of stars is scaled by the $H$ index, which is consistent with Skumanich's relationship. Finally, our approach suggests that the $H$ index may be related to the evolution of stellar angular momentum and a star's magnetic properties.
  • Magnetic activity on stars manifests itself in the form of dark spots on the stellar surface, that cause modulation of a few percent in the light curve of the star as it rotates. When a planet eclipses its host star, it might cross in front of one of these spots creating a "bump" in the transit light curve. By modelling these spot signatures, it is possible to determine the physical properties of the spots such as size, temperature, and location. In turn, the monitoring of the spots longitude provides estimates of the stellar rotation and differential rotation. This technique was applied to the star Kepler-17, a solar--type star orbited by a hot Jupiter. The model yields the following spot characteristics: average radius of $49 \pm 10$ Mm, temperatures of $5100 \pm 300$ K, and surface area coverage of $6 \pm 4$ \%. The rotation period at the transit latitude, $-5^\circ$, occulted by the planet was found to be $11.92 \pm 0.05$ d, slightly smaller than the out--of--transit average period of $12.4 \pm 0.1$ d. Adopting a solar like differential rotation, we estimated the differential rotation of Kepler-17 to be $\Delta\Omega = 0.041 \pm 0.005$ rd/d, which is close to the solar value of 0.050 rd/d, and a relative differential rotation of $\Delta\Omega/\Omega=8.0 \pm 0.9$ \%. Since Kepler-17 is much more active than our Sun, it appears that for this star larger rotation rate is more effective in the generation of magnetic fields than shear.
  • The first generation of E-ELT instruments will include an optical-infrared High Resolution Spectrograph, conventionally indicated as EELT-HIRES, which will be capable of providing unique breakthroughs in the fields of exoplanets, star and planet formation, physics and evolution of stars and galaxies, cosmology and fundamental physics. A 2-year long phase A study for EELT-HIRES has just started and will be performed by a consortium composed of institutes and organisations from Brazil, Chile, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom. In this paper we describe the science goals and the preliminary technical concept for EELT-HIRES which will be developed during the phase A, as well as its planned development and consortium organisation during the study.
  • In present paper, we investigate the multifractality signatures in hourly time series extracted from CoRoT spacecraft database. Our analysis is intended to highlight the possibility that astrophysical time series can be members of a particular class of complex and dynamic processes which require several photometric variability diagnostics to characterize their structural and topological properties. To achieve this goal, we search for contributions due to nonlinear temporal correlation and effects caused by heavier tails than the Gaussian distribution, using a detrending moving average algorithm for one-dimensional multifractal signals (MFDMA). We observe that the correlation structure is the main source of multifractality, while heavy-tailed distribution plays a minor role in generating the multifractal effects. Our work also reveals that rotation period of stars is inherently scaled by degree of multifractality. As a result, analyzing the multifractal degree of referred series, we uncover an evolution of multifractality from shorter to larger periods.
  • The present study reports the discovery of Sun-like stars, namely main-sequence stars with $T_{\rm eff}$, $\log g$ and rotation periods $P_{rot}$ similar to solar values, presenting evidence of surface differential rotation. An autocorrelation of the time series was used to select stars presenting photometric signal stability from a sample of 881 stars with light curves collected by the $Kepler$ space-borne telescope, in which we have identified 17 stars with stable signals. A simple two-spot model together with a Bayesian information criterion were applied to these stars in the search for indications of differential rotation; in addition, for all 17 stars, it was possible to compute the spot rotation period $P$, the mean values of the individual spot rotation periods and their respective colatitudes, and the relative amplitude of the differential rotation.
  • We study the distribution of the photometric rotation period (Prot), which is a direct measurement of the surface rotation at active latitudes, for three subsamples of Sun-like stars: one from CoRoT data and two from Kepler data. We identify the main populations of these samples and interpret their main biases specifically for a comparison with the solar Prot. Prot and variability amplitude (A) measurements were obtained from public CoRoT and Kepler catalogs combined with physical parameters. Because these samples are subject to selection effects, we computed synthetic samples with simulated biases to compare with observations, particularly around the location of the Sun in the HR diagram. Theoretical grids and empirical relations were used to combine physical parameters with Prot and A. Biases were simulated by performing cutoffs on the physical and rotational parameters in the same way as in each observed sample. A crucial cutoff is related with the detectability of the rotational modulation, which strongly depends on A. The synthetic samples explain the observed Prot distributions of Sun-like stars as having two main populations: one of young objects (group I, with ages younger than ~1 Gyr) and another of MS and evolved stars (group II, with ages older than ~1 Gyr). The proportions of groups I and II in relation to the total number of stars range within 64-84% and 16-36%, respectively. Hence, young objects abound in the distributions, producing the effect of observing a high number of short periods around the location of the Sun in the HR diagram. Differences in the Prot distributions between the CoRoT and Kepler Sun-like samples may be associated with different Galactic populations. Overall, the synthetic distribution around the solar period agrees with observations, which suggests that the solar rotation is normal with respect to Sun-like stars within the accuracy of current data.
  • Until a few years ago, the amplitude variation in the photometric data had been limitedly explored mainly because of time resolution and photometric sensitivity limitations. This investigation is now possible thanks to the Kepler and CoRoT databases which provided a unique set of data for studying of the nature of stellar variability cycles. The present study characterizes the amplitude variation in a sample of main--sequence stars with light curves collected using CoRoT exo--field CCDs. We analyze potential stellar activity cycles by studying the variability amplitude over small boxes. The cycle periods and amplitudes were computed based on the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, harmonic fits, and visual inspection. As a first application of our approach we have considered the photometric data for 16 CoRoT FGK main sequence stars, revisited during the IRa01, LRa01 and LRa06 CoRoT runs. The 16 CoRoT stars appear to follow the empirical relations between activity cycle periods ($P_{cyc}$) and the rotation period ($P_{rot}$) found by previous works. In addition to the so-called A (active) and I (inactive) sequences previously identified, there is a possible third sequence, here named S (short-cycles) sequence. However, recovery fractions estimated from simulations suggest that only a half of our sample has confident cycle measurements. Therefore, more study is needed to verify our results and Kepler data shall be notably useful for such a study. Overall, our procedure provides a key tool for exploring the CoRoT and Kepler databases to identify and characterize stellar cycle variability.
  • For 6 years the Convection, Rotation, and Planetary Transits (CoRoT) space mission has acquired photometric data from more than one hundred thousand point sources towards and directly opposite from the inner and outer regions of the Galaxy. The high temporal resolution of the CoRoT data combined with the wide time span of the observations has enabled the study of short and long time variations in unprecedented detail. From the initial sample of 2534 stars classified as M-giants in the CoRoT databasis, we selected 1428 targets that exhibit well defined variability, using visual inspection. The variability period and amplitude of C1 stars (stars having Teff < 4200 K) were computed using Lomb-Scargle and harmonic fit methods. The trends found in the V-I vs J-K color-color diagram are in agreement with standard empirical calibrations for M-giants. The sources located towards the inner regions of the Galaxy are distributed throughout the diagram while the majority of the stars towards the outer regions of the Galaxy are spread between the calibrations of M-giants and the predicted position for Carbon stars. The stars classified as supergiants follow a different sequence from the one found for giant stars. We also performed a KS test of the period and amplitude of stars towards the inner and outer regions of the Galaxy. We obtained a low probability that the two samples come from the same parent distribution. The observed behavior of the period-amplitude and period-Teff diagrams are, in general, in agreement with those found for Kepler sources and ground based photometry, with pulsation being the dominant cause responsible for the observed modulation. We also conclude that short-time variations on M-Giant stars do not exist orare very rare and the few cases we found are possibly related to biases or background stars.
  • Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of sub-stellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present letter we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points for remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the Sun rotation. These giants are combined with 6 other recently listed in the literature for mid-IR diagnostic based on WISE information, from which a trend for an infrared excess is revealed for at least a half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.
  • Aims:To support the computation and evolutionary interpretation of periods associated with the rotational modulation, oscillations, and variability of stars located in the CoRoT fields, we are conducting a spectroscopic survey for stars located in the fields already observed by the satellite. These observations allow us to compute physical and chemical parameters for our stellar sample. Method: Using spectroscopic observations obtained with UVES/VLT and Hydra/Blanco, and based on standard analysis techniques, we computed physical and chemical parameters ($T_{\rm{eff}}$, $\log \,(g)$, $\rm{[Fe/H]}$, $v_{\rm{mic}}$, $v_{\rm{rad}}$, $v \sin \,(i)$, and $A(\rm{Li})$) for a large sample of CoRoT targets. Results: We provide physical and chemical parameters for a sample comprised of 138 CoRoT targets. Our analysis shows the stars in our sample are located in different evolutionary stages, ranging from the main sequence to the red giant branch, and range in spectral type from F to K. The physical and chemical properties for the stellar sample are in agreement with typical values reported for FGK stars. However, we report three stars presenting abnormal lithium behavior in the CoRoT fields. These parameters allow us to properly characterize the intrinsic properties of the stars in these fields. Our results reveal important differences in the distributions of metallicity, $T_{\rm eff}$, and evolutionary status for stars belonging to different CoRoT fields, in agreement with results obtained independently from ground-based photometric surveys. Conclusions: Our spectroscopic catalog, by providing much-needed spectroscopic information for a large sample of CoRoT targets, will be of key importance for the successful accomplishment of several different programs related to the CoRoT mission, thus it will help further boost the scientific return associated with this space mission.
  • We present the results of a blind exercise to test the recoverability of stellar rotation and differential rotation in Kepler light curves. The simulated light curves lasted 1000 days and included activity cycles, Sun-like butterfly patterns, differential rotation and spot evolution. The range of rotation periods, activity levels and spot lifetime were chosen to be representative of the Kepler data of solar like stars. Of the 1000 simulated light curves, 770 were injected into actual quiescent Kepler light curves to simulate Kepler noise. The test also included five 1000-day segments of the Sun's total irradiance variations at different points in the Sun's activity cycle. Five teams took part in the blind exercise, plus two teams who participated after the content of the light curves had been released. The methods used included Lomb-Scargle periodograms and variants thereof, auto-correlation function, and wavelet-based analyses, plus spot modelling to search for differential rotation. The results show that the `overall' period is well recovered for stars exhibiting low and moderate activity levels. Most teams reported values within 10% of the true value in 70% of the cases. There was, however, little correlation between the reported and simulated values of the differential rotation shear, suggesting that differential rotation studies based on full-disk light curves alone need to be treated with caution, at least for solar-type stars. The simulated light curves and associated parameters are available online for the community to test their own methods.
  • We performed a uniform and detailed abundance analysis of 12 refractory elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Co, Sc, Mn, and V) for a sample of 257 G- and K-type evolved stars from the CORALIE planet search program. To date, only one of these stars is known to harbor a planetary companion. We aimed to characterize this large sample of evolved stars in terms of chemical abundances and kinematics, thus setting a solid base for further analysis of planetary properties around giant stars. This sample, being homogeneously analyzed, can be used as a comparison sample for other planet-related studies, as well as for different type of studies related to stellar and Galaxy astrophysics. The abundances of the chemical elements were determined using an LTE abundance analysis relative to the Sun, with the spectral synthesis code MOOG and a grid of Kurucz ATLAS9 atmospheres. To separate the Galactic stellar populations both a purely kinematical approach and a chemical method were applied. We confirm the overabundance of Na in giant stars compared to the field FGK dwarfs. This enhancement might have a stellar evolutionary character, but departures from LTE may also produce a similar enhancement. Our chemical separation of stellar populations also suggests a "gap" in metallicity between the thick-disk and high-alpha metal-rich stars, as previously observed in dwarfs sample from HARPS. The present sample, as most of the giant star samples, also suffers from the B - V colour cut-off, which excludes low-log g stars with high metallicities, and high-logg star with low-[Fe/H]. For future studies of planet occurrence dependence on stellar metallicity around these evolved stars we suggest to use a sub-sample of stars in a "cut-rectangle" in the logg - [Fe/H] diagram to overcome the aforementioned issue.
  • The study of stellar parameters of planet-hosting stars, such as metallicity and chemical abundances, help us to understand the theory of planet formation and stellar evolution. Here, we present a catalogue of accurate stellar atmospheric parameters and iron abundances for a sample of 257 K and G field evolved stars that are being surveyed for planets using precise radial--velocity measurements as part of the CORALIE programme to search for planets around giants. The analysis was done using a set of high--resolution and high--signal-to-noise Ultraviolet and Visible Echelle Spectrograph spectra. The stellar parameters were derived using Fe I and II ionization and excitation equilibrium methods. To take into account possible effects related to the choice of the lines on the derived parameters, we used three different iron line-list sets in our analysis, and the results differ among themselves by a small factor for most of stars. {For those stars with previous literature parameter estimates, we found very good agreement with our own values.} In the present catalogue we are providing new precise spectroscopic measurements of effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulence, and metallicity for 190 stars for which it has not been found or published in previous articles.
  • We analyzed the host stars of the present sample of confirmed planets detected by Kepler and Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) to compute new photometric rotation periods and to study the behavior of their angular momentum. Lomb-Scargle periodograms and wavelet maps were computed for 3,807 stars. For 540 of these stars, we were able to detect rotational modulation of the light curves at a significance level of greater than 99%. For 63 of these 540 stars, no rotation measurements were previously available in the literature. According to the published masses and evolutionary tracks of the stars in this sample, the sample is composed of M- to F-type stars (with masses of 0.48-1.53 M$_{\odot}$) with rotation periods that span a range of 2 to 89 days. These periods exhibit an excellent agreement with previously reported (for the stars for which such values are available), and the observed rotational period distribution strongly agrees with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, for the 540 sources considered here, the stellar angular momentum provides an important test of Kraft's relation based on the photometric rotation periods. Finally, this study directly contributes in a direct approach to our understanding of how angular momentum is distributed between the host star and its (detected) planetary system; the role of angular momentum exchange in such systems is an unavoidable piece of the stellar rotation puzzle.
  • Stellar variability in the near-infrared (NIR) remains largely unexplored. The exploitation of public science archives with data-mining methods offers a perspective for the time-domain exploration of the NIR sky. We perform a comprehensive search for stellar variability using the optical-NIR multi-band photometric data in the public Calibration Database of the WFCAM Science Archive (WSA), with the aim of contributing to the general census of variable stars, and to extend the current scarce inventory of accurate NIR light curves for a number of variable star classes. We introduce new variability indices designed for multi-band data with correlated sampling, and apply them for pre-selecting variable star candidates, i.e., light curves that are dominated by correlated variations, from noise-dominated ones. Pre-selection criteria are established by robust numerical tests for evaluating the response of variability indices to colored noise characteristic to the data. We find 275 periodic variable stars and an additional 44 objects with suspected variability with uncertain periods or apparently aperiodic variation. Only 44 of these objects had been previously known, including 11 RR~Lyrae stars in the outskirts of the globular cluster M3 (NGC~5272). We provide a preliminary classification of the new variable stars that have well-measured light curves, but the variability types of a large number of objects remain ambiguous. We classify most of the new variables as contact binary stars, but we also find several pulsating stars, among which 34 are probably new field RR~Lyrae and 3 are likely Cepheids. We also identify 32 highly reddened variable objects close to previously known dark nebulae, suggesting that these are embedded young stellar objects. We publish our results and all light-curve data as the WFCAM Variable Star Catalog.
  • The dynamics of the interstellar medium (ISM) are strongly affected by turbulence, which shows increased anisotropy in the presence of a magnetic field. We expand upon the Esquivel & Lazarian method to estimate the Alfven Mach number using the structure function anisotropy in velocity centroid data from position-position-velocity maps. We utilize 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of fully developed turbulence, with a large range of sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers, to produce synthetic observations of velocity centroids with observational characteristics such as thermal broadening, cloud boundaries, noise, and radiative transfer effects of carbon monoxide. In addition, we investigate how the resulting anisotropy-Alfven Mach number dependency found in Esquivel & Lazarian (2011) might change when taking the second moment of the position-position-velocity cube or when using different expressions to calculate the velocity centroids. We find that the degree of anisotropy is related primarily to the magnetic field strength (i.e. Alfven Mach number) and the line-of-sight orientation, with a secondary effect on sonic Mach number. If the line-of-sight is parallel to up to ~45 deg off of the mean field direction, the velocity centroid anisotropy is not prominent enough to distinguish different Alfvenic regimes. The observed anisotropy is not strongly affected by including radiative transfer, although future studies should include additional tests for opacity effects. These results open up the possibility of studying the magnetic nature of the ISM using statistical methods in addition to existing observational techniques.
  • Aims. The wavelet transform has been used as a powerful tool for treating several problems in astrophysics. In this work, we show that the time-frequency analysis of stellar light curves using the wavelet transform is a practical tool for identifying rotation, magnetic activity, and pulsation signatures. We present the wavelet spectral composition and multiscale variations of the time series for four classes of stars: targets dominated by magnetic activity, stars with transiting planets, those with binary transits, and pulsating stars. Methods. We applied the Morlet wavelet (6th order), which offers high time and frequency resolution. By applying the wavelet transform to the signal, we obtain the wavelet local and global power spectra. The first is interpreted as energy distribution of the signal in time-frequency space, and the second is obtained by time integration of the local map. Results. Since the wavelet transform is a useful mathematical tool for nonstationary signals, this technique applied to Kepler and CoRoT light curves allows us to clearly identify particular signatures for different phenomena. In particular, patterns were identified for the temporal evolution of the rotation period and other periodicity due to active regions affecting these light curves. In addition, a beat-pattern signature in the local wavelet map of pulsating stars over the entire time span was also detected.
  • We introduce a method of measuring a lower limit to the amplitude of surface differential rotation from high-precision, evenly sampled photometric time series. It is applied to main-sequence late-type stars whose optical flux modulation is dominated by starspots. An autocorrelation of the time series was used to select stars that allow an accurate determination of starspot rotation periods. A simple two-spot model was applied together with a Bayesian information criterion to preliminarily select intervals of the time series showing evidence of differential rotation with starspots of almost constant area. Finally, the significance of the differential rotation detection and a measurement of its amplitude and uncertainty were obtained by an a posteriori Bayesian analysis based on a Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach. We applied our method to the Sun and eight other stars for which previous spot modelling had been performed to compare our results with previous ones. We find that autocorrelation is a simple method for selecting stars with a coherent rotational signal that is a prerequisite for successfully measuring differential rotation through spot modelling. For a proper Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis, it is necessary to take the strong correlations among different parameters that exist in spot modelling into account. For the planet-hosting star Kepler-30, we derive a lower limit to the relative amplitude of the differential rotation of \Delta P / P = 0.0523 \pm 0.0016. We confirm that the Sun as a star in the optical passband is not suitable for measuring differential rotation owing to the rapid evolution of its photospheric active regions. In general, our method performs well in comparison to more sophisticated and time-consuming approaches.
  • Rotational and radial velocities have been measured for 1589 evolved stars of spectral types F, G and K and luminosity classes IV, III, II and Ib, based on observations carried out with the CORAVEL spectrometers. The precision in radial velocity is better than 0.30 km/s per observation, whereas rotational velocity uncertainties are typically 1.0 km/s for subgiants and giants and 2.0 km/s for class II giants and Ib supergiants.
  • Recent pieces of evidence have revealed that most, and possibly all, globular star clusters are composed of groups of stars that formed in multiple episodes with different chemical compositions. In this sense, it has also been argued that variations in the initial helium abundance ($Y$) from one population to the next are also the rule, rather than the exception. In the case of the metal-intermediate globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121), recent high-resolution spectroscopic observations of blue horizontal branch (HB) stars (i.e., HB stars hotter than the RR Lyrae instability strip) suggest that a large fraction of blue HB stars are second-generation stars formed with high helium abundances. In this paper, we test this scenario by using recent photometric and spectroscopic data together with theoretical evolutionary computations for different $Y$ values. Comparing the photometric data with the theoretically-derived color-magnitude diagrams, we find that the bulk of the blue HB stars in M4 have $\Delta Y \lesssim 0.01$ with respect to the cluster's red HB stars (i.e., HB stars cooler than the RR Lyrae strip)-- a result which is corroborated by comparison with spectroscopically derived gravities and temperatures, which also favor little He enhancement. However, the possible existence of a minority population on the blue HB of the cluster with a significant He enhancement level is also discussed.
  • The present work reports on the discovery of three stars that we have identified to be rotating Sun-like stars, based on rotational modulation signatures inferred from light curves from the CoRoT mission's Public Archives. In our analysis, we performed an initial selection based on rotation period and position in the Period--$T_{\rm eff}$ diagram. This revealed that the stars CoRoT IDs 100746852, 102709980, and 105693572 provide potentially good matches to the Sun with similar rotation period. To refine our analysis, we applied a novel procedure, taking into account the fluctuations of the features associated to photometric modulation at different time intervals and the fractality traces that are present in the light curves of the Sun and of these "New Sun" candidates alike. In this sense, we computed the so-called Hurst exponent for the referred stars, for a sample of fourteen CoRoT stars with sub- and super-solar rotational periods, and for the Sun, itself, in its active and quiet phases. We found that the Hurst exponent can provide a strong discriminant of Sun-like behavior, going beyond what can be achieved with solely the rotation period itself. In particular, we find that CoRoT ID 105693572 is the star that most closely matches the solar rotation properties, as far as the latter's imprints on light curve behavior is concerned. The stars CoRoT IDs 100746852 and 102709980 have significant smaller Hurst exponents than the Sun, notwithstanding their similarity in rotation periods.
  • To date, the CoRoT space mission has produced more than 124,471 light curves. Classifying these curves in terms of unambiguous variability behavior is mandatory for obtaining an unbiased statistical view on their controlling root-causes. The present study provides an overview of semi-sinusoidal light curves observed by the CoRoT exo-field CCDs. We selected a sample of 4,206 light curves presenting well-defined semi-sinusoidal signatures. The variability periods were computed based on Lomb-Scargle periodograms, harmonic fits, and visual inspection. Color-period diagrams for the present sample show the trend of an increase of the variability periods as long as the stars evolve. This evolutionary behavior is also noticed when comparing the period distribution in the Galactic center and anti-center directions. These aspects indicate a compatibility with stellar rotation, although more information is needed to confirm their root-causes. Considering this possibility, we identified a subset of three Sun-like candidates by their photometric period. Finally, the variability period versus color diagram behavior was found to be highly dependent on the reddening correction.
  • The pioneering study by Skumanich (1972) showed that the rotational velocity of G-type Main-Sequence (MS) stars decreases with stellar age according to $<v \sin i>$ $\propto$ $t^{-1/2}$. This relationship is consistent with simple theories of angular momentum loss from rotating stars, where an ionized wind is coupled to the star by a magnetic field. The present study introduces a new approach to the study of stellar rotational braking in unsaturated F and G type stars limited in age and mass, connecting angular momentum loss by magnetic stellar wind with Tsallis nonextensive statistical mechanics. As a result, we show that the rotation-age relationship can be well reproduced using a nonextensive approach from Tsallis nonextensive models. Here, the index $q$, which is related to the degree of nonextensivity, can be associated to the dynamo process and to magnetic field geometry, offering relevant information on the level of stellar magnetic braking for F- and G-type Main-Sequence stars.
  • In the present study, we analyze the radial velocity distribution as a function of different stellar parameters such as stellar age, mass, rotational velocity and distance to the Sun for a sample of 6781 single low--mass field dwarf stars, located in the solar neighborhood. We show that the radial velocity distributions are best fitted by $q$--Gaussians that arise within the Tsallis nonextensive statistics. The obtained distributions cannot be described by the standard Gaussian that emerges within Boltzmann-Gibbs (B--G) statistical mechanics. The results point to the existence of a hierarchical structure in phase space, in contrast to the uniformly occupied phase space of B--G statistical mechanics, driven by the $q$--Central Limit Theorem, consistent with nonextensive statistical mechanics.