• Direct imaging has led to the discovery of several giant planet and brown dwarf companions. These imaged companions populate a mass, separation and age domain (mass>1MJup, orbits>5AU, age<1Gyr) quite distinct from the one occupied by exoplanets discovered by the radial velocity or transit methods. This distinction could pinpoint that different formation mechanisms are at play. We aim at investigating correlations between the host star's mass and the presence of wide-orbit giant planets, and at providing new observational constraints on planetary formation models. We observed 58 young and nearby M-type dwarfs in L'-band with the VLT/NaCo instrument and used ADI algorithms to optimize the sensitivity to planetary-mass companions and to derive the best detection limits. We estimate the probability of detecting a planet as a function of its mass and physical separation around each target. We conduct a Bayesian analysis to determine the frequency of substellar companions orbiting low-mass stars, using a homogenous sub-sample of 54 stars. We derive a frequency of $4.4^{+3.2}_{-1.3}\%$ for companions with masses in the range of 2-80MJup}, and $2.3^{+2.9}_{-0.7}$\% for planetary mass companions (2-14MJup), at physical separations of 8 to 400AU for both cases. Comparing our results with a previous survey targeting more massive stars, we find evidence that substellar companions more massive than 1MJup with a low mass ratio Q with respect to their host star (Q<1%), are less frequent around low-mass stars. This may represent an observational evidence that the frequency of imaged wide-orbit substellar companions is correlated with stellar mass, corroborating theoretical expectations. On the opposite, we show statistical evidence that intermediate-mass ratio (1%<Q<5%) companion with masses >2MJup might be independent from the mass of the host star.
  • Directly detecting thermal emission from young extrasolar planets allows measurement of their atmospheric composition and luminosity, which is influenced by their formation mechanism. Using the Gemini Planet Imager, we discovered a planet orbiting the \$sim$20 Myr-old star 51 Eridani at a projected separation of 13 astronomical units. Near-infrared observations show a spectrum with strong methane and water vapor absorption. Modeling of the spectra and photometry yields a luminosity of L/LS=1.6-4.0 x 10-6 and an effective temperature of 600-750 K. For this age and luminosity, "hot-start" formation models indicate a mass twice that of Jupiter. This planet also has a sufficiently low luminosity to be consistent with the "cold- start" core accretion process that may have formed Jupiter.
  • We report the discovery of a low-mass companion to the nearby (d = 47 pc) F7V star HD 984. The companion is detected 0.19" away from its host star in the L' band with the Apodizing Phase Plate on NaCo/VLT and was recovered by L'-band non-coronagraphic imaging data taken a few days later. We confirm the companion is co-moving with the star with SINFONI integral field spectrograph H+K data. We present the first published data obtained with SINFONI in pupil-tracking mode. HD 984 has been argued to be a kinematic member of the 30 Myr-old Columba group, and its HR diagram position is not altogether inconsistent with being a ZAMS star of this age. By consolidating different age indicators, including isochronal age, coronal X-ray emission, and stellar rotation, we independently estimate a main sequence age of 115$\pm$85 Myr (95% CL) which does not rely on this kinematic association. The mass of directly imaged companions are usually inferred from theoretical evolutionary tracks, which are highly dependent on the age of the star. Based on the age extrema, we demonstrate that with our photometric data alone, the companion's mass is highly uncertain: between 33 and 96 M$_{\rm Jup}$ (0.03-0.09 M$_{\odot}$) using the COND evolutionary models. We compare the companion's SINFONI spectrum with field dwarf spectra to break this degeneracy. Based on the slope and shape of the spectrum in the H-band, we conclude that the companion is an M$6.0\pm0.5$ dwarf. The age of the system is not further constrained by the companion, as M dwarfs are poorly fit on low-mass evolutionary tracks. This discovery emphasizes the importance of obtaining a spectrum to spectral type companions around F-stars.
  • The intermediate-mass star Beta Pictoris is known to be surrounded by a structured edge-on debris disk within which a gas giant planet was discovered orbiting at 8-10 AU. The physical properties of Beta Pic b were previously inferred from broad and narrow-band 0.9-4.8 microns photometry. We used commissioning data of the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) to obtain new astrometry and a low-resolution (R=35-39) J-band (1.12-1.35 microns) spectrum of the planet. We find that the planet has passed the quadrature. We constrain its semi-major axis to $\leq$ 10 AU (90 % prob.) with a peak at 8.9+0.4-0.6 AU. The joint fit of the planet astrometry and the most recent radial velocity measurements of the star yields a planet's dynamical mass $\leq$ 20 MJup (greater than 96 % prob.). The extracted spectrum of Beta Pic b is similar to those of young L1-1.5+1 dwarfs. We use the spectral type estimate to revise the planet luminosity to log(L/Lsun)=-3.90+-0.07. The 0.9-4.8 microns photometry and spectrum are reproduced for Teff=1650+-150 K and a log g lower than 4.7 dex by 12 grids of PHOENIX-based and LESIA atmospheric models. If we adopt the most recent system age estimate (21+-4 Myr), the bolometric luminosity and the constraints on the dynamical mass of Beta Pic b are only reproduced by warm- and hot-start tracks with initial entropies Si greater than 10.5 kB/baryon. Such initial conditions may result from an inefficient accretion shock and/or a planetesimal density at formation higher than in the classical core accretion model. Considering a younger age for the system or a conservative formation time for Beta Pic b does not change these conclusions.
  • [Abridged] Context. Spectral differential imaging (SDI) is part of the observing strategy of current and future high-contrast imaging instruments. It aims to reduce the stellar speckles that prevent the detection of cool planets by using in/out methane-band images. It attenuates the signature of off-axis companions to the star, such as angular differential imaging (ADI). However, this attenuation depends on the spectral properties of the low-mass companions we are searching for. The implications of this particularity on estimating the detection limits have been poorly explored so far. Aims. We perform an imaging survey to search for cool (Teff<1000-1300 K) giant planets at separations as close as 5-10 AU. We also aim to assess the sensitivity limits in SDI data taking the photometric bias into account. This will lead to a better view of the SDI performance. Methods. We observed a selected sample of 16 stars (age < 200 Myr, d < 25 pc) with the phase-mask coronagraph, SDI, and ADI modes of VLT/NaCo. Results. We do not detect any companions. As for the sensitivity limits, we argue that the SDI residual noise cannot be converted into mass limits because it represents a differential flux, unlike the case of single-band images. This results in degeneracies for the mass limits, which may be removed with the use of single-band constraints. We instead employ a method of directly determining the mass limits. The survey is sensitive to cool giant planets beyond 10 AU for 65% and 30 AU for 100% of the sample. Conclusions. For close-in separations, the optimal regime for SDI corresponds to SDI flux ratios >2. According to the BT-Settl model, this translates into Teff<800 K. The methods described here can be applied to the data interpretation of SPHERE. We expect better performance with the dual-band imager IRDIS, thanks to more suitable filter characteristics and better image quality.
  • Spectral differential imaging (SDI) is part of the observing strategy of current and on-going high-contrast imaging instruments on ground-based telescopes. Although it improves the star light rejection, SDI attenuates the signature of off-axis companions to the star, just like angular differential imaging (ADI). However, the attenuation due to SDI has the peculiarity of being dependent on the spectral properties of the companions. To date, no study has investigated these effects. Our team is addressing this problem based on data from a direct imaging survey of 16 stars combining the phase-mask coronagraph, the SDI and the ADI modes of VLT/NaCo. The objective of the survey is to search for cool (Teff<1000-1300 K) giant planets at separations of 5-10 AU orbiting young, nearby stars (<200 Myr, <25 pc). The data analysis did not yield any detections. As for the estimation of the sensitivity limits of SDI-processed images, we show that it requires a different analysis than that used in ADI-based surveys. Based on a method using the flux predictions of evolutionary models and avoiding the estimation of contrast, we determine directly the mass sensitivity limits of the survey for the ADI processing alone and with the combination of SDI and ADI. We show that SDI does not systematically improve the sensitivity due to the spectral properties and self-subtraction of point sources.
  • VLT/NaCo angular differential imaging at L' (3.8 microns) revealed a probable giant planet comoving with the young and early-type HD 95086 also known to harbor an extended debris disk. The discovery was based on the proper motion analysis of two datasets spanning 15 months. However, the second dataset suffered from bad atmospheric conditions, which limited the significance of the redetection at the 3 sigma level. In this Letter, we report new VLT/NaCo observations of HD 95086 obtained on 2013 June 26-27 at L' to recover the planet candidate. We unambiguously redetect the companion HD 95086 b with multiple independent pipelines at a signal-to-noise ratio greater than or equal to 5. Combined with previously reported measurements, our astrometry decisively shows that the planet is comoving with HD 95086 and inconsistent with a background object. With a revised mass of 5 pm 2 Jupiter masses, estimated from its L' photometry and "hot-start" models at 17 pm 4 Myr, HD 95086 b becomes a new benchmark for further physical and orbital characterization of young giant planets.
  • We present our analysis of the Gemini/NICI H-band data of HD 95086, following the discovery of the planet HD 95086 b in L'. The H-band data reach a contrast of 12.7 mag relative to the host star at 5 sigma levels in the location of HD 95086 b, and no point source is found. Our non-detection and H-L' color limit rules out the possibility that the object is a foreground L/T dwarf and that, if it is bound to HD 95086, it is a genuine planetary mass object. We estimate a new pre-main-sequence isochronal age for HD 95086 of 17+/-4 Myr, which is commensurate with previous mean age estimates for the Lower Cen-Crux subgroup. Adopting an age of 17 Myr, the color limit is inconsistent with the COND model, marginally consistent with the BT-SETTL model, and consistent with the DUSTY model.
  • Direct imaging has just started the inventory of the population of gas giant planets on wide-orbits around young stars in the solar neighborhood. Following this approach, we carried out a deep imaging survey in the near-infrared using VLT/NaCo to search for substellar companions. We report here the discovery in L' (3.8 microns) images of a probable companion orbiting at 56 AU the young (10-17 Myr), dusty, and early-type (A8) star HD 95086. This discovery is based on observations with more than a year-time-lapse. Our first epoch clearly revealed the source at 10 sigma while our second epoch lacked good observing conditions hence yielding a 3 sigma detection. Various tests were thus made to rule out possible artifacts. This recovery is consistent with the signal at the first epoch but requires cleaner confirmation. Nevertheless, our astrometric precision suggests the companion to be comoving with the star, with a 3 sigma confidence level. The planetary nature of the source is reinforced by a non-detection in Ks-band (2.18 microns) images according to its possible extremely red Ks - L' color. Conversely, background contamination is rejected with good confidence level. The luminosity yields a predicted mass of about 4-5MJup (at 10-17 Myr) using "hot-start" evolutionary models, making HD 95086 b the exoplanet with the lowest mass ever imaged around a star.
  • Stars in young nearby associations are the only targets allowing giant planet searches at all separations in the near future, by coupling indirect techniques such as radial velocity and deep imaging. These stars are first priorities targets for the forthcoming planets imagers on 10-m class telescopes. Young stars rotate more rapidly and are more active than their older counterparts. Both effects can limit the capability to detect planets using RV. We wish to explore the planet detection capabilities of a representative sample of stars in close and young associations with radial velocity data and explore the complementarity between this technique and direct imaging. We observed 26 such targets with spectral types from A to K and ages from
  • Direct imaging has confirmed the existence of substellar companions on wide orbits. To understand the formation and evolution mechanisms of these companions, the full population properties must be characterized. We aim at detecting giant planet and/or brown dwarf companions around young, nearby, and dusty stars. Our goal is also to provide statistics on the population of giant planets at wide-orbits and discuss planet formation models. We report a deep survey of 59 stars, members of young stellar associations. The observations were conducted with VLT/NaCo at L'-band (3.8 micron). We used angular differential imaging to reach optimal detection performance. A statistical analysis of about 60 % of the young and southern A-F stars closer than 65 pc allows us to derive the fraction of giant planets on wide orbits. We use gravitational instability models and planet population synthesis models following the core-accretion scenario to discuss the occurrence of these companions. We resolve and characterize new visual binaries and do not detect any new substellar companion. The survey's median detection performance reaches contrasts of 10 mag at 0.5as and 11.5 mag at 1as. We find the occurrence of planets to be between 10.8-24.8 % at 68 % confidence level assuming a uniform distribution of planets in the interval 1-13 Mj and 1-1000 AU. Considering the predictions of formation models, we set important constraints on the occurrence of massive planets and brown dwarf companions that would have formed by GI. We show that this mechanism favors the formation of rather massive clump (Mclump > 30 Mj) at wide (a > 40 AU) orbits which might evolve dynamically and/or fragment. For the population of close-in giant planets that would have formed by CA, our survey marginally explore physical separations (<20 AU) and cannot constrain this population.
  • Context. It has long been suggested that circumstellar disks surrounding young stars may be the signposts of planets, and still more since the recent discoveries of embedded substellar companions. The planet-disk interaction may create, according to models, large structures, gaps, rings or spirals, in the disk. In that sense, the Herbig star HD 142527 is particularly compelling as, its massive disk displays intriguing asymmetries that suggest the existence of a dynamical peturber of unknown nature. Aims. Our goal was to obtain deep thermal images of the close circumstellar environment of HD 142527 to re-image the reported close-in structures (cavity, spiral arms) of the disk and to search for stellar and substellar companions that could be connected to their presence. Results. The circumstellar environment of HD 142527 is revealed at an unprecedented spatial resolution down to the sub arcsecond level for the first time at 3.8 microns. Our images reveal important radial and azimuthal asymmetries which invalidate an elliptical shape for the disk as previously proposed. It rather suggests a bright inhomogeneous spiral arm plus various fainter spiral arms. We also confirm an inner cavity down to 30 AU and two important dips at position angles of 0 and 135 deg. The detection performance in angular differential imaging enables the exploration of the planetary mass regime for projected physical separations as close as 40 AU. The use of our detection map together with Monte Carlo simulations sets stringent constraints on the presence of planetary mass, brown dwarf or stellar companions as a function of the semi-major axis. They severely constrain the presence of massive giant planets with semi-major axis beyond 50AU, i.e. probably within the large disk's cavity that radially extends up to 145 AU or even further outside.
  • We applied the approach of K.-Y. Yang, T. M. Rice and F.-Ch. Zhang (YRZ) to analyze the high resolution angular resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) data in BiSCO obtained recently at Brookhaven. In the YRZ ansatz a constant RVB gap is assumed which leads to Luttinger zeros along the antiferromagnetic Brillouin zone (AFBZ) and four Fermi pockets centered on the nodal directions. We relax the assumption of a constant RVB gap function, treating it as a Ising order parameter accompanied by thermal fluctuations. If these thermal fluctuations are very strong leading to strictly short range correlations in the spatial dependence of the RVB gap, then the reconstruction of the Fermi surface into pockets will not survive. We examined the intermediate case of critical fluctuations leading to a power law falloff of the RVB gap correlations. To this end we followed the analysis recently developed by two of us to treat the effect of the power law correlations in the antiferromagnetic 2-dimensional xy model on the single electron Green's function. The partial truncation of the Fermi surface to form pockets survives in the presence of power law correlations. The linewidth of the quasiparticle peaks increases with the exponent of the power law correlations. If this exponent is set at the value of critical fluctuations in the 2-dimensional Ising model a relatively small linewidth is obtained. If this exponent is doubled, a linewidth comparable to the values found in recent ARPES experiments on underdoped BiSCO (Tc = 65 K) at T = 140K was obtained. The anisotropic suppression of the quasiparticle peak around the Fermi pockets hides the back side of the pockets closest to the AFBZ to give essentially Fermi arcs seen experimentally.