• During pilot observations of the Virgo Environmental Survey Tracing Galaxy Evolution (VESTIGE), a blind narrow-band Halpha+[NII] imaging survey of the Virgo cluster carried out with MegaCam at the CFHT, we have observed the spiral galaxy NGC 4254 (M99). Deep Halpha+[NII] narrow-band and GALEX UV images revealed the presence of 60 compact (70-500 pc radius) star forming regions up to ~ 20 kpc outside the optical disc of the galaxy. These regions are located along a tail of HI gas stripped from the disc of the galaxy after a rapid gravitational encounter with another Virgo cluster member that simulations indicate occurred 280-750 Myr ago. We have combined the VESTIGE data with multifrequency data from the UV to the far-infrared to characterise the stellar populations of these regions and study the star formation process in an extreme environment such as the tails of stripped gas embedded in the hot intracluster medium. The colour, spectral energy distribution (SED), and linear size consistently indicate that these regions are coeval and have been formed after a single burst of star formation that occurred ~< 100 Myr ago. These regions might become free floating objects within the cluster potential well, and be the local analogues of compact sources produced after the interaction of gas-rich systems that occurred during the early formation of clusters.
  • The Virgo Environmental Survey Tracing Ionised Gas Emission (VESTIGE) is a blind narrow-band H$\alpha$+[NII] imaging survey carried out with MegaCam at the CFHT. During pilot observations we have observed NGC 4330, an intermediate mass, edge-on star forming spiral currently falling into the core of the Virgo cluster. New deep observations revealed a low surface brightness 10 kpc tail exhibiting a peculiar filamentary structure. The filaments are remarkably parallel one another and clearly indicate the direction of motion of the galaxy in the Virgo potential. Motivated by the detection of these features, indicating ongoing gas stripping, we collected literature photometry in 15 bands from the far-UV to the far-IR and deep optical long slit spectroscopy using the FORS2 instrument at the ESO Very Large Telescope. Using a newly developed Monte Carlo code that jointly fits spectroscopy and photometry, we reconstructed the star formation histories in apertures along the major axis of the galaxy. Our results have been validated against the output of CIGALE, a fitting code which has been previously used for similar studies. We found a clear outside-in gradient with radius of the time when the quenching event started: the outermost radii have been stripped 500 Myr ago, while the stripping has reached the inner 5 kpc from the center in the last 100 Myr. Regions at even smaller radii are currently still forming stars fueled by the presence of HI and H2 gas. When compared to statistical studies of the quenching timescales in the local Universe we find that ram pressure stripping of the cold gas is an effective mechanism to reduce the transformation times for galaxies falling into massive clusters. Future systematic studies of all the active galaxies observed by VESTIGE in the Virgo cluster will extend these results to a robust statistical framework.
  • The Virgo Environmental Survey Tracing Ionised Gas Emission (VESTIGE) is a blind narrow-band Halpha+[NII] imaging survey carried out with MegaCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The survey covers the whole Virgo cluster region from its core to one virial radius (104 deg^2). The sensitivity of the survey is of f(Halpha) ~ 4 x 10^-17 erg sec-1 cm^-2 (5 sigma detection limit) for point sources and Sigma (Halpha) ~ 2 x 10^-18 erg sec^-1 cm^-2 arcsec^-2 (1 sigma detection limit at 3 arcsec resolution) for extended sources, making VESTIGE the deepest and largest blind narrow-band survey of a nearby cluster. This paper presents the survey in all its technical aspects, including the survey design, the observing strategy, the achieved sensitivity in both the narrow-band Halpha+[NII] and in the broad-band r filter used for the stellar continuum subtraction, the data reduction, calibration, and products, as well as its status after the first observing semester. We briefly describe the Halpha properties of galaxies located in a 4x1 deg^2 strip in the core of the cluster north of M87, where several extended tails of ionised gas are detected. This paper also lists the main scientific motivations of VESTIGE, which include the study of the effects of the environment on galaxy evolution, the fate of the stripped gas in cluster objects, the star formation process in nearby galaxies of different type and stellar mass, the determination of the Halpha luminosity function and of the Halpha scaling relations down to ~ 10^6 Mo stellar mass objects, and the reconstruction of the dynamical structure of the Virgo cluster. This unique set of data will also be used to study the HII luminosity function in hundreds of galaxies, the diffuse Halpha+[NII] emission of the Milky Way at high Galactic latitude, and the properties of emission line galaxies at high redshift.
  • Low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) represent a significant percentage of local galaxies but their formation and evolution remain elusive. They may hold crucial information for our understanding of many key issues (i.e., census of baryonic and dark matter, star formation in the low density regime, mass function). The most massive examples - the so called giant LSBGs - can be as massive as the Milky Way, but with this mass being distributed in a much larger disk. Malin 1 is an iconic giant LSBG, perhaps the largest disk galaxy known. We attempt to bring new insights on its structure and evolution on the basis of new images covering a wide range in wavelength. We have computed surface brightness profiles (and average surface brightnesses in 16 regions of interest), in six photometric bands (FUV, NUV, u, g, i, z). We compared these data to various models, testing a variety of assumptions concerning the formation and evolution of Malin 1. We find that the surface brightness and color profiles can be reproduced by a long and quiet star-formation history due to the low surface density; no significant event, such as a collision, is necessary. Such quiet star formation across the giant disk is obtained in a disk model calibrated for the Milky Way, but with an angular momentum approximately 20 times larger. Signs of small variations of the star-formation history are indicated by the diversity of ages found when different regions within the galaxy are intercompared.For the first time, panchromatic images of Malin 1 are used to constrain the stellar populations and the history of this iconic example among giant LSBGs. Based on our model, the extreme disk of Malin 1 is found to have a long history of relatively low star formation (about 2 Msun/yr). Our model allows us to make predictions on its stellar mass and metallicity.
  • (Abridged) We investigate the intrinsic shapes of low-luminosity galaxies in the central 300 kpc of the Virgo cluster using deep imaging obtained as part of the NGVS. We build a sample of nearly 300 red-sequence cluster members in the yet unexplored $-14 < M_{g} < -8$ magnitude range. The observed distribution of apparent axis ratios is then fit by families of triaxial models with normally-distributed intrinsic ellipticities and triaxialities. We develop a Bayesian framework to explore the posterior distribution of the model parameters, which allows us to work directly on discrete data, and to account for individual, surface brightness-dependent axis ratio uncertainties. For this population we infer a mean intrinsic ellipticity E=0.43, and a mean triaxiality T=0.16. This implies that faint Virgo galaxies are best described as a family of thick, nearly oblate spheroids with mean intrinsic axis ratios 1:0.94:0.57. We additionally attempt a study of the intrinsic shapes of Local Group satellites of similar luminosities. For the LG population we infer a slightly larger mean intrinsic ellipticity E=0.51, and the paucity of objects with round apparent shapes translates into more triaxial mean shapes, 1:0.76:0.49. We finally compare the intrinsic shapes of NGVS low-mass galaxies with samples of more massive quiescent systems, and with field, star-forming galaxies of similar luminosities. We find that the intrinsic flattening in this low-luminosity regime is almost independent of the environment in which the galaxy resides--but there is a hint that objects may be slightly rounder in denser environments. The comparable flattening distributions of low-luminosity galaxies that have experienced very different degrees of environmental effects suggests that internal processes are the main drivers of galaxy structure at low masses--with external mechanisms playing a secondary role.
  • The importance and signatures of cosmic tau--(anti)neutrinos have been studied for upward-- and downward--going $\mu^-+\mu^+$ and hadronic shower event rates relevant for present and future underground water or ice detectors, utilizing the unique and reliable ultrasmall--$x$ predictions of the dynamical (radiative) parton model. The upward--going $\mu^- +\mu^+$ event rates calculated just from cosmic $\nu_{\mu}+\bar{\nu}_{\mu}$ fluxes are sizeably enhanced by taking into account cosmic $\nu_{\tau}+ \bar{\nu}_{\tau}$ fluxes and their associated $\tau^- +\tau^+$ fluxes as well. The coupled transport equations for the upward--going $\stackrel{(-)}{\nu}_{\tau}$ flux traversing the Earth imply an enhancement of the attenuated and regenerated $\stackrel{(-)}{\nu}_{\tau}$ flux typically around $10^4-10^5$ GeV with respect to the initial cosmic flux. This enhancement turns out to be smaller than obtained so far, in particular for flatter initial cosmic fluxes behaving like $E_{\nu}^{-1}$. Downward--going $\mu^- +\mu^+$ events and in particular the background--free and unique hadronic `double bang' and `lollipop' events allow to test downward--going cosmic $\nu_{\tau} +\bar{\nu}_{\tau}$ fluxes up to about $10^9$ GeV.