• We have selected a sample of eleven massive clusters of galaxies observed by the Hubble Space Telescope in order to study the impact of the dynamical state on the IntraCluster Light (ICL) fraction, the ratio of total integrated ICL to the total galaxy member light. With the exception of the Bullet cluster, the sample is drawn from the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey and the Frontier Fields program, containing five relaxed and six merging clusters. The ICL fraction is calculated in three optical filters using the CHEFs IntraCluster Light Estimator, a robust and accurate algorithm free of a priori assumptions. We find that the ICL fraction in the three bands is, on average, higher for the merging clusters, ranging between $\sim7-23\%$, compared with the $\sim 2-11\%$ found for the relaxed systems. We observe a nearly constant value (within the error bars) in the ICL fraction of the regular clusters at the three wavelengths considered, which would indicate that the colors of the ICL and the cluster galaxies are, on average, coincident and, thus, their stellar populations. However, we find a higher ICL fraction in the F606W filter for the merging clusters, consistent with an excess of lower-metallicity/younger stars in the ICL, which could have migrated violently from the outskirts of the infalling galaxies during the merger event.
  • Silicon optics with wide bandwidth anti-reflection (AR) coatings, made of multi-layer textured silicon surfaces, are developed for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Single and double layer AR coatings were designed for an optimal transmission centered on 250 GHz, and fabricated using the DRIE (Deep Reaction Ion Etching) technique. Tests of high resistivity silicon wafers with single-layer coatings between 75 GHz and 330 GHz are presented and compared with the simulations.
  • We present accurate photometric redshifts for galaxies observed by the Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). CLASH observed 25 massive galaxy cluster cores with the Hubble Space Telescope in 16 filters spanning 0.2 - 1.7 $\mu$m. Photometry in such crowded fields is challenging. Compared to our previously released catalogs, we make several improvements to the photometry, including smaller apertures, ICL subtraction, PSF matching, and empirically measured uncertainties. We further improve the Bayesian Photometric Redshift (BPZ) estimates by adding a redder elliptical template and by inflating the photometric uncertainties of the brightest galaxies. The resulting photometric redshift accuracies are dz/(1+z) $\sim$ 0.8\%, 1.0\%, and 2.0\% for galaxies with I-band F814W AB magnitudes $<$ 18, 20, and 23, respectively. These results are consistent with our expectations. They improve on our previously reported accuracies by a factor of 4 at the bright end and a factor of 2 at the faint end. Our new catalog includes 1257 spectroscopic redshifts, including 382 confirmed cluster members. We also provide stellar mass estimates. Finally, we include lensing magnification estimates of background galaxies based on our public lens models. Our new catalog of all 25 CLASH clusters is available via MAST. The analysis techniques developed here will be useful in other surveys of crowded fields, including the Frontier Fields and surveys carried out with J-PAS and JWST.
  • To investigate the relationship between thermal and non-thermal components in merger galaxy clusters, we present deep JVLA and Chandra observations of the HST Frontier Fields cluster MACS J0717.5+3745. The Chandra image shows a complex merger event, with at least four components belonging to different merging subclusters. NW of the cluster, $\sim 0.7$ Mpc from the center, there is a ram-pressure-stripped core that appears to have traversed the densest parts of the cluster after entering the ICM from the direction of a galaxy filament to the SE. We detect a density discontinuity NNE of this core which we speculate is associated with a cold front. Our radio images reveal new details for the complex radio relic and radio halo in this cluster. In addition, we discover several new filamentary radio sources with sizes of 100-300 kpc. A few of these seem to be connected to the main radio relic, while others are either embedded within the radio halo or projected onto it. A narrow-angled-tailed (NAT) radio galaxy, a cluster member, is located at the center of the radio relic. The steep spectrum tails of this AGN leads into the large radio relic where the radio spectrum flattens again. This morphological connection between the NAT radio galaxy and relic provides evidence for re-acceleration (revival) of fossil electrons. The presence of hot $\gtrsim 20$ keV ICM gas detected by Chandra near the relic location provides additional support for this re-acceleration scenario.
  • Selecting sources with rising flux densities towards longer wavelengths from Herschel/SPIRE maps is an efficient way to produce a catalogue rich in high-redshift (z > 4) dusty star-forming galaxies. The effectiveness of this approach has already been confirmed by spectroscopic follow-up observations, but the previously available catalogues made this way are limited by small survey areas. Here we apply a map-based search method to 274 deg$^2$ of the HerMES Large Mode Survey (HeLMS) and create a catalogue of 477 objects with SPIRE flux densities $S_{500} > S_{350} >S_{250}$ and a $5 \sigma$ cut-off $S_{500} > $ 52 mJy. From this catalogue we determine that the total number of these "red" sources is at least an order of magnitude higher than predicted by galaxy evolution models. These results are in agreement with previous findings in smaller HerMES fields; however, due to our significantly larger sample size we are also able to investigate the shape of the red source counts for the first time. We have obtained spectroscopic redshift measurements for two of our sources using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The redshifts z = 5.1 and z = 3.8 confirm that with our selection method we can indeed find high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies.
  • We report on high-resolution JVLA and Chandra observations of the HST Frontier Cluster MACS J0717.5+3745. MACS J0717.5+3745 offers the largest contiguous magnified area of any known cluster, making it a promising target to search for lensed radio and X-ray sources. With the high-resolution 1.0-6.5 GHz JVLA imaging in A and B configuration, we detect a total of 51 compact radio sources within the area covered by the HST imaging. Within this sample we find 7 lensed sources with amplification factors larger than $2$. None of these sources are identified as multiply-lensed. Based on the radio luminosities, the majority of these sources are likely star forming galaxies with star formation rates of 10-50 M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ located at $1 \lesssim z \lesssim 2$. Two of the lensed radio sources are also detected in the Chandra image of the cluster. These two sources are likely AGN, given their $2-10$ keV X-ray luminosities of $\sim 10^{43-44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. From the derived radio luminosity function, we find evidence for an increase in the number density of radio sources at $0.6<z<2.0$, compared to a $z < 0.3$ sample. Our observations indicate that deep radio imaging of lensing clusters can be used to study star forming galaxies, with star formation rates as low as $\sim10$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$, at the peak of cosmic star formation history.
  • The HST Frontier Fields cluster MACS J1149.6+2223 is one of the most complex merging clusters, believed to consist of four dark matter halos. We present results from deep (365 ks) Chandra observations of the cluster, which reveal the most distant cold front (z=0.544) discovered to date. In the cluster outskirts, we also detect hints of a surface brightness edge that could be the bow shock preceding the cold front. The substructure analysis of the cluster identified several components with large relative radial velocities, thus indicating that at least some collisions occur almost along the line of sight. The inclination of the mergers with respect to the plane of the sky poses significant observational challenges at X-ray wavelengths. MACS J1149.6+2223 possibly hosts a steep-spectrum radio halo. If the steepness of the radio halo is confirmed, then the radio spectrum, combined with the relatively regular ICM morphology, could indicate that MACS J1149.6+2223 is an old merging cluster.
  • Merging galaxy clusters leave long-lasting signatures on the baryonic and non-baryonic cluster constituents, including shock fronts, cold fronts, X-ray substructure, radio halos, and offsets between the dark matter and the gas components. Using observations from Chandra, the Jansky Very Large Array, the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, and the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a multiwavelength analysis of the merging Frontier Fields cluster MACS J0416.1-2403 (z=0.396), which consists of a NE and a SW subclusters whose cores are separated on the sky by ~250 kpc. We find that the NE subcluster has a compact core and hosts an X-ray cavity, yet it is not a cool core. Approximately 450 kpc south-south west of the SW subcluster, we detect a density discontinuity that corresponds to a compression factor of ~1.5. The discontinuity was most likely caused by the interaction of the SW subcluster with a less massive structure detected in the lensing maps SW of the subcluster's center. For both the NE and the SW subclusters, the dark matter and the gas components are well-aligned, suggesting that MACS J0416.1-2403 is a pre-merging system. The cluster also hosts a radio halo, which is unusual for a pre-merging system. The halo has a 1.4 GHz power of (1.06 +/- 0.09) x 10^{24} W Hz^{-1}, which is somewhat lower than expected based on the X-ray luminosity of the cluster. We suggest that we are either witnessing the birth of a radio halo, or have discovered a rare ultra-steep spectrum halo.
  • We present scaling relations between the integrated Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, $Y_{\rm SZ}$, its X-ray analogue, $Y_{\rm X}\equiv M_{\rm gas}T_{\rm X}$, and total mass, $M_{\rm tot}$, for the 45 galaxy clusters in the Bolocam X-ray-SZ (BOXSZ) sample. All parameters are integrated within $r_{2500}$. $Y_{2500}$ values are measured using SZE data collected with Bolocam, operating at 140 GHz at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). The temperature, $T_{\rm X}$, and mass, $M_{\rm gas,2500}$, of the intracluster medium are determined using X-ray data collected with Chandra, and $M_{\rm tot}$ is derived from $M_{\rm gas}$ assuming a constant gas mass fraction. Our analysis accounts for several potential sources of bias, including: selection effects, contamination from radio point sources, and the loss of SZE signal due to noise filtering and beam-smoothing effects. We measure the $Y_{2500}$--$Y_{\rm X}$ scaling to have a power-law index of $0.84\pm0.07$, and a fractional intrinsic scatter in $Y_{2500}$ of $(21\pm7)\%$ at fixed $Y_{\rm X}$, both of which are consistent with previous analyses. We also measure the scaling between $Y_{2500}$ and $M_{2500}$, finding a power-law index of $1.06\pm0.12$ and a fractional intrinsic scatter in $Y_{2500}$ at fixed mass of $(25\pm9)\%$. While recent SZE scaling relations using X-ray mass proxies have found power-law indices consistent with the self-similar prediction of 5/3, our measurement stands apart by differing from the self-similar prediction by approximately 5$\sigma$. Given the good agreement between the measured $Y_{2500}$--$Y_{\rm X}$ scalings, much of this discrepancy appears to be caused by differences in the calibration of the X-ray mass proxies adopted for each particular analysis.
  • We present the results of a numerical study based on the analysis of the MUSIC-2 simulations, aimed at estimating the expected concentration-mass relation for the CLASH cluster sample. We study nearly 1400 halos simulated at high spatial and mass resolution, which were projected along many lines-of-sight each. We study the shape of both their density and surface-density profiles and fit them with a variety of radial functions, including the Navarro-Frenk-White, the generalised Navarro-Frenk-White, and the Einasto density profiles. We derive concentrations and masses from these fits and investigate their distributions as a function of redshift and halo relaxation. We use the X-ray image simulator X-MAS to produce simulated Chandra observations of the halos and we use them to identify objects resembling the X-ray morphologies and masses of the clusters in the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We also derive a concentration-mass relation for strong-lensing clusters. We find that the sample of simulated halos which resemble the X-ray morphology of the CLASH clusters is composed mainly by relaxed halos, but it also contains a significant fraction of un-relaxed systems. For such a sample we measure an average 2D concentration which is ~11% higher than found for the full sample of simulated halos. After accounting for projection and selection effects, the average NFW concentrations of CLASH clusters are expected to be intermediate between those predicted in 3D for relaxed and super-relaxed halos. Matching the simulations to the individual CLASH clusters on the basis of the X-ray morphology, we expect that the NFW concentrations recovered from the lensing analysis of the CLASH clusters are in the range [3-6], with an average value of 3.87 and a standard deviation of 0.61. Simulated halos with X-ray morphologies similar to those of the CLASH clusters are affected by a modest orientation bias.
  • We present a new determination of the concentration-mass relation for galaxy clusters based on our comprehensive lensing analysis of 19 X-ray selected galaxy clusters from the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble (CLASH). Our sample spans a redshift range between 0.19 and 0.89. We combine weak lensing constraints from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and from ground-based wide field data with strong lensing constraints from HST. The result are reconstructions of the surface-mass density for all CLASH clusters on multi-scale grids. Our derivation of NFW parameters yields virial masses between 0.53 x 10^15 and 1.76 x 10^15 M_sol/h and the halo concentrations are distributed around c_200c ~ 3.7 with a 1-sigma significant negative trend with cluster mass. We find an excellent 4% agreement between our measured concentrations and the expectation from numerical simulations after accounting for the CLASH selection function based on X-ray morphology. The simulations are analyzed in 2D to account for possible biases in the lensing reconstructions due to projection effects. The theoretical concentration-mass (c-M) relation from our X-ray selected set of simulated clusters and the c-M relation derived directly from the CLASH data agree at the 90% confidence level.
  • We present a method for selecting $z>4$ dusty, star forming galaxies (DSFGs) using Herschel/SPIRE 250/350/500 $\mu m$ flux densities to search for red sources. We apply this method to 21 deg$^2$ of data from the HerMES survey to produce a catalog of 38 high-$z$ candidates. Follow-up of the first 5 of these sources confirms that this method is efficient at selecting high-$z$ DSFGs, with 4/5 at $z=4.3$ to $6.3$ (and the remaining source at $z=3.4$), and that they are some of the most luminous dusty sources known. Comparison with previous DSFG samples, mostly selected at longer wavelengths (e.g., 850 $\mu m$) and in single-band surveys, shows that our method is much more efficient at selecting high-$z$ DSFGs, in the sense that a much larger fraction are at $z>3$. Correcting for the selection completeness and purity, we find that the number of bright ($S_{500\,\mu m} \ge 30$ mJy), red Herschel sources is $3.3 \pm 0.8$ deg$^{-2}$. This is much higher than the number predicted by current models, suggesting that the DSFG population extends to higher redshifts than previously believed. If the shape of the luminosity function for high-$z$ DSFGs is similar to that at $z\sim2$, rest-frame UV based studies may be missing a significant component of the star formation density at $z=4$ to $6$, even after correction for extinction.
  • The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect spectrum crosses through a null where dT_CMB = 0 near nu_0 = 217 GHz. In a cluster of galaxies, nu_0 can be shifted from the canonical thermal SZ effect value by corrections to the SZ effect scattering due to the properties of the inter-cluster medium. We have measured the SZ effect in the hot galaxy cluster RX J1347.5-1145 with Z-Spec, an R ~ 300 grating spectrometer sensitive between 185 and 305 GHz. These data comprise a high spectral resolution measurement around the null of the SZ effect and clearly exhibit the transition from negative to positive dT_CMB over the Z-Spec band. The SZ null position is measured to be nu_0 = 225.8 \pm 2.5 (stat.) \pm 1.2 (sys.) GHz, which differs from the canonical null frequency by 3.0 sigma and is evidence for modifications to the canonical thermal SZ effect shape. Assuming the measured shift in nu_0 is due only to relativistic corrections to the SZ spectrum, we place the limit T_e = 17.1 \pm 5.3 keV from the zero-point measurement alone. By simulating the response of the instrument to the sky, we are able to generate likelihood functions in {y_0, T_e, v_pec} space. For v_pec = 0 km/s, we measure the best fitting SZ model to be y_0 = 4.6 (+0.6, -0.9) x 10^-4, T_e,0 = 15.2 (+12,-7.4) keV. When v_pec is allowed to vary, a most probable value of v_pec = +450 \pm 810 km/s is found.
  • We report measurements of the fluctuations in atmospheric emission (atmospheric noise) above Mauna Kea recorded with Bolocam at 143 and 268 GHz from the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). The 143 GHz data were collected during a 40 night observing run in late 2003, and the 268 GHz observations were made in early 2004 and early 2005 over a total of 60 nights. Below 0.5 Hz, the data time-streams are dominated by atmospheric noise in all observing conditions. The atmospheric noise data are consistent with a Kolmogorov-Taylor (K-T) turbulence model for a thin wind-driven screen, and the median amplitude of the fluctuations is 280 mK^2 rad^(-5/3) at 143 GHz and 4000 mK^2 rad^(-5/3) at 268 GHz. Comparing our results with previous ACBAR data, we find that the normalization of the power spectrum of the atmospheric noise fluctuations is a factor of 80 larger above Mauna Kea than above the South Pole at millimeter wavelengths. Most of this difference is due to the fact that the atmosphere above the South Pole is much drier than the atmosphere above Mauna Kea. However, the atmosphere above the South Pole is slightly more stable as well: the fractional fluctuations in the column depth of precipitable water vapor are a factor of sqrt(2) smaller at the South Pole compared to Mauna Kea. Based on our atmospheric modeling, we developed several algorithms to remove the atmospheric noise, and the best results were achieved when we described the fluctuations using a low-order polynomial in detector position over the 8 arcmin field of view (FOV). However, even with these algorithms, we were not able to reach photon-background-limited instrument photometer (BLIP) performance at frequencies below 0.5 Hz in any observing conditions.
  • We have surveyed two science fields totaling one square degree with Bolocam at 2.1 mm to search for secondary CMB anisotropies caused by the Sunyaev- Zel'dovich effect (SZE). The fields are in the Lynx and Subaru/XMM SDS1 fields. Our survey is sensitive to angular scales with an effective angular multipole of l_eff = 5700 with FWHM_l = 2800 and has an angular resolution of 60 arcseconds FWHM. Our data provide no evidence for anisotropy. We are able to constrain the level of total astronomical anisotropy, modeled as a flat bandpower in C_l, with frequentist 68%, 90%, and 95% CL upper limits of 590, 760, and 830 uKCMB^2. We statistically subtract the known contribution from primary CMB anisotropy, including cosmic variance, to obtain constraints on the SZE anisotropy contribution. Now including flux calibration uncertainty, our frequentist 68%, 90% and 95% CL upper limits on a flat bandpower in C_l are 690, 960, and 1000 uKCMB^2. When we instead employ the analytic spectrum suggested by Komatsu and Seljak (2002), and account for the non-Gaussianity of the SZE anisotropy signal, we obtain upper limits on the average amplitude of their spectrum weighted by our transfer function of 790, 1060, and 1080 uKCMB^2. We obtain a 90% CL upper limit on sigma8, which normalizes the power spectrum of density fluctuations, of 1.57. These are the first constraints on anisotropy and sigma8 from survey data at these angular scales at frequencies near 150 GHz.
  • We present a large-scale millimeter continuum map of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. Nearly 11 square degrees, including all of the area in the cloud with visual extinction more than 3 magnitudes, was mapped at 1.1 mm with Bolocam on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). By design, the map also covers the region mapped in the infrared with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We detect 44 definite sources, and a few likely sources are also seen along a filament in the eastern streamer. The map indicates that dense cores in Ophiuchus are very clustered and often found in filaments within the cloud. Most sources are round, as measured at the half power point, but elongated when measured at lower contour levels, suggesting spherical sources lying within filaments. The masses, for an assumed dust temperature of 10 K, range from 0.24 to 3.9 solar masses, with a mean value of 0.96 solar masses. The total mass in distinct cores is 42 solar masses, 0.5 to 2% of the total cloud mass, and the total mass above 4 sigma is about 80 solar masses. The mean densities in the cores are quite high, with an average of 1.6 x 10^6 per cc, suggesting short free-fall times. The core mass distribution can be fitted with a power law with slope of 2.1 plus or minus 0.3 for M>0.5 solar masses, similar to that found in other regions, but slightly shallower than that of some determinations of the local IMF. In agreement with previous studies, our survey shows that dense cores account for a very small fraction of the cloud volume and total mass. They are nearly all confined to regions with visual extinction at least 9 mag, a lower threshold than found previously.
  • We perform a fluctuation analysis of the 1.1mm Bolocam Lockman Hole Survey, which covers 324 square arcmin to a very uniform point source-filtered RMS noise level of 1.4 mJy/beam. The fluctuation analysis has the significant advantage of utilizing all of the available data. We constrain the number counts in the 1-10 mJy range, and derive significantly tighter constraints than in previous work: the power-law index is 2.7 (+0.18, -0.15), while the amplitude is equal to 1595 (+85,-238) sources per mJy per square degree, or N(>1 mJy) = 940 (+50,-140) sources/square degree (95% confidence). Our results agree extremely well with those derived from the extracted source number counts by Laurent et al (2005). Our derived normalization is about 2.5 times smaller than determined by MAMBO at 1.2mm by Greve et al (2004). However, the uncertainty in the normalization for both data sets is dominated by the systematic (i.e., absolute flux calibration) rather than statistical errors; within these uncertainties, our results are in agreement. We estimate that about 7% of the 1.1mm background has been resolved at 1 mJy.