• A central mystery in high temperature superconductivity is the origin of the so-called "strange metal," i.e., the anomalous conductor from which superconductivity emerges at low temperature. Measuring the dynamic charge response of the copper-oxides, $\chi''(q,\omega)$, would directly reveal the collective properties of the strange metal, but it has never been possible to measure this quantity with meV resolution. Here, we present the first measurement of $\chi''(q,\omega)$ for a cuprate, optimally doped Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+x}$ ($T_c=91$ K), using momentum-resolved inelastic electron scattering. In the medium energy range 0.1-2 eV relevant to the strange metal, the spectra are dominated by a featureless, temperature- and momentum-independent continuum persisting to the eV energy scale. This continuum displays a simple power law form, exhibiting $q^2$ behavior at low energy and $q^2/\omega^2$ behavior at high energy. Measurements of an overdoped crystal ($T_c=50$ K) showed the emergence of a gap-like feature at low temperature, indicating deviation from power law form outside the strange metal regime. Our study suggests the strange metal exhibits a new type of charge dynamics in which excitations are local to such a degree that space and time axes are decoupled.
  • Interest in the superconducting proximity effect has recently been reignited by theoretical predictions that it could be used to achieve topological superconductivity. Low-T$_{c}$ superconductors have predominantly been used in this effort, but small energy scales of ~1 meV have hindered the characterization of the emergent electronic phase, limiting it to extremely low temperatures. In this work, we use molecular beam epitaxy to grow topological insulator Bi$_{2}$Te$_{3}$ in a range of thicknesses on top of a high-T$_{c}$ superconductor Fe(Te,Se). Using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, we detect {\Delta}$_{ind}$ as high as ~3.5 meV, which is the largest reported gap induced by proximity to an s-wave superconductor to-date. We find that {\Delta}$_{ind}$ decays with Bi$_{2}$Te$_{3}$ thickness, but remains finite even after the topological surface states had been formed. Finally, by imaging the scattering and interference of surface state electrons, we provide a microscopic visualization of the fully gaped Bi$_{2}$Te$_{3}$ surface state due to Cooper pairing. Our results establish Fe-based high-T$_{c}$ superconductors as a promising new platform for realizing high-T$_{c}$ topological superconductivity.
  • We study the behavior of the pseudogap in overdoped Bi$_{2}$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+d}$ by electronic Raman scattering (ERS) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on the same single crystals. Using both techniques we find that, unlike the superconducting gap, the pseudogap related to the anti-bonding band vanishes above the critical doping p$_c$ = 0.22. Concomitantly, we show from ARPES measurements that the Fermi surface of the anti-bonding band is hole-like below pc and becomes electron-like above p$_c$. This reveals that the appearance of the pseudogap depends on the Fermi surface topology in Bi$_{2}$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+d}$ , and more generally, puts strong constraint on theories of the pseudogap phase.
  • The possibility of driving phase transitions in low-density condensates through the loss of phase coherence alone has far-reaching implications for the study of quantum phases of matter. This has inspired the development of tools to control and explore the collective properties of condensate phases via phase fluctuations. Electrically-gated oxide interfaces, ultracold Fermi atoms, and cuprate superconductors, which are characterized by an intrinsically small phase-stiffness, are paradigmatic examples where these tools are having a dramatic impact. Here we use light pulses shorter than the internal thermalization time to drive and probe the phase fragility of the Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$ cuprate superconductor, completely melting the superconducting condensate without affecting the pairing strength. The resulting ultrafast dynamics of phase fluctuations and charge excitations are captured and disentangled by time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. This work demonstrates the dominant role of phase coherence in the superconductor-to-normal state phase transition and offers a benchmark for non-equilibrium spectroscopic investigations of the cuprate phase diagram.
  • The temperature dependence of the London penetration depth $\Delta\lambda(T)$ in the superconducting doped topological crystalline insulator Sn$_{1-x}$In$_x$Te was measured down to 450 mK for two different doping levels, x $\approx$ 0.45 (optimally doped) and x $\approx$ 0.10 (underdoped), bookending the range of cubic phase in the compound. The results indicate no deviation from fully gapped BCS-like behavior, eliminating several candidate unconventional gap structures. Critical field values below 1 K and other superconducting parameters are also presented. The introduction of disorder by repeated particle irradiation with 5 MeV protons does not enhance $T_c$, indicating that ferroelectric interactions do not compete with superconductivity.
  • Combining electronic Raman scattering experiments with cellular dynamical mean field theory, we present evidence of the pseudogap in the superconducting state of various hole-doped cuprates. In Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+d we track the superconducting pseudogap hallmark, a peak-dip feature, as a function of temperature T and doping p, well beyond the optimal one. We show that, at all temperatures under the superconducting dome, the pseudogap disappears at the doping pc, between 0.222 and 0.226, where also the normal-state pseudogap collapses at a Lifshitz transition. This demonstrates that the superconducting pseudogap boundary forms a vertical line in the T-p phase diagram.
  • Topological superconductivity is the quantum condensate of paired electrons with an odd parity of the pairing function. One of the candidates is the triplet pairing superconductor derived from topological insulator Bi2Se3 by chemical doping. Theoretically it was predicted that a two-fold superconducting order parameter may exist in this kind of bulk topological superconductor. Earlier experiments by nuclear magnetic resonance and angle-resolved magnetocaloric measurements seem to support this picture. By using a Corbino-shape like electrode configuration, we measure the c-axis resistivity without the influence of the vortex motion and find clear evidence of two-fold superconductivity in the recently discovered topological superconductor SrxBi2Se3. The Laue diffraction measurements on these samples show that the maximum gap direction is either parallel or perpendicular to the main crystallographic axis.
  • The detailed temperature dependence of the infrared-active mode in Fe$_{1.03}$Te ($T_N\simeq 68$ K) and Fe$_{1.13}$Te ($T_N\simeq 56$ K) has been examined, and the position, width, strength, and asymmetry parameter determined using an asymmetric Fano profile superimposed on an electronic background. In both materials the frequency of the mode increases as the temperature is reduced; however, there is also a slight asymmetry in the line shape, indicating that the mode is coupled to either spin or charge excitations. Below $T_N$ there is an anomalous decrease in frequency and the mode shows little temperature dependence, at the same time becoming more symmetric, suggesting a reduction in spin- or electron-phonon coupling. The frequency of the infrared-active mode and the magnitude of the shift below $T_N$ are predicted reasonably well by first-principles calculations; however, the predicted splitting of the mode is not observed. In superconducting FeTe$_{0.55}$Se$_{0.45}$ ($T_c\simeq 14$ K) the infrared-active $E_u$ mode displays asymmetric line shape at all temperatures, which is most pronounced between 100 - 200 K, indicating the presence of either spin- or electron-phonon coupling, which may be a necessary prerequisite for superconductivity in this class of materials.
  • We report a fine tuned doping study of strongly overdoped Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$ single crystals using electronic Raman scattering. Combined with theoretical calculations, we show that the doping, at which the normal state pseudogap closes, coincides with a Lifshitz quantum phase transition where the active hole-like Fermi surface becomes electron-like. This conclusion suggests that the microscopic cause of the pseudogap is sensitive to the Fermi surface topology. Furthermore, we find that the superconducting transition temperature is unaffected by this transition, demonstrating that their origins are different on the overdoped side.
  • In complex materials various interactions play important roles in determining the material properties. Angle Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARPES) has been used to study these processes by resolving the complex single particle self energy $\Sigma(E)$ and quantifying how quantum interactions modify bare electronic states. However, ambiguities in the measurement of the real part of the self energy and an intrinsic inability to disentangle various contributions to the imaginary part of the self energy often leave the implications of such measurements open to debate. Here we employ a combined theoretical and experimental treatment of femtosecond time-resolved ARPES (tr-ARPES) and show how measuring the population dynamics using tr-ARPES can be used to separate electron-boson interactions from electron-electron interactions. We demonstrate the analysis of a well-defined electron-boson interaction in the unoccupied spectrum of the cuprate Bi$_{2}$Sr$_{2}$CaCu$_{2}$O$_{8+x}$ characterized by an excited population decay time constant $\tau_{QP}$ that maps directly to a discrete component of the equilibrium self energy not readily isolated by static ARPES experiments.
  • We used low-energy, momentum-resolved inelastic electron scattering to study surface collective modes of the three-dimensional topological insulators Bi$_2$Se$_3$ and Bi$_{0.5}$Sb$_{1.5}$Te$_{3-x}$Se$_{x}$. Our goal was to identify the "spin plasmon" predicted by Raghu and co-workers [S. Raghu, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 116401 (2010)]. Instead, we found that the primary collective mode is a surface plasmon arising from the bulk, free carrers in these materials. This excitation dominates the spectral weight in the bosonic function of the surface, $\chi "(\textbf{q},\omega)$, at THz energy scales, and is the most likely origin of a quasiparticle dispersion kink observed in previous photoemission experiments. Our study suggests that the spin plasmon may mix with this other surface mode, calling for a more nuanced understanding of optical experiments in which the spin plasmon is reported to play a role.
  • Understanding the mechanism of high transition temperature (Tc) superconductivity in cuprates has been hindered by the apparent complexity of their multilayered crystal structure. Using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscopy, we report on layer-by-layer probing of the electronic structures of all ingredient planes (BiO, SrO, CuO2) of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta} superconductor prepared by argon-ion bombardment and annealing technique. We show that the well-known pseudogap (PG) feature observed by STM is inherently a property of the BiO planes and thus irrelevant directly to Cooper pairing. The SrO planes exhibit an unexpected Van Hove singularity near the Fermi level, while the CuO2 planes are exclusively characterized by a smaller gap inside the PG. The small gap becomes invisible near Tc, which we identify as the superconducting gap. The above results constitute severe constraints on any microscopic model for high Tc superconductivity in cuprates.
  • Superconductors derived from topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators by doping have long been considered to be candidates as topological superconductors. Pb$_{0.5}$Sn$_{0.5}$Te is a topological crystalline insulator with mirror symmetry protected surface states on (001), (011) and (111) oriented surfaces. The superconductor (Pb$_{0.5}$Sn$_{0.5}$)$_{0.7}$In$_{0.3}$Te is induced by In doping in Pb$_{0.5}$Sn$_{0.5}$Te, and is thought to be a topological superconductor. Here we report the first scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurement of the superconducting state as well as the superconducting energy gap in (Pb$_{0.5}$Sn$_{0.5}$)$_{0.7}$In$_{0.3}$Te on a (001)-oriented surface. The spectrum can be well fitted by an anisotropic $s$-wave gap function of $\Delta=0.72+0.18\cos4\theta$ meV using Dynes model. The results show that the quasi-particle density of states seem to be fully gapped without any in-gap states, in contradiction with the expectation of a topological superconductor.
  • The temperature dependence of the in-plane optical conductivity has been determined for Fe$_{1.03}$Te above and below the magnetic and structural transition at $T_N\simeq 68$ K. The electron and hole pockets are treated as two separate electronic subsystems; a strong, broad Drude response that is largely temperature independent, and a much weaker, narrow Drude response with a strong temperature dependence. Spectral weight is transferred from high to low frequency below $T_N$, resulting in the dramatic increase of both the low-frequency conductivity and the related plasma frequency. The change in the plasma frequency is due to an increase in the carrier concentration resulting from the closing of the pseudogap on the electron pocket, as well as the likely decrease of the effective mass in the antiferromagnetic state.
  • In three-dimensional topological insulators (3D TI) nanowires, transport occurs via gapless surface states where the spin is fixed perpendicular to the momentum[1-6]. Carriers encircling the surface thus acquire a \pi Berry phase, which is predicted to open up a gap in the lowest-energy 1D surface subband. Inserting a magnetic flux ({\Phi}) of h/2e through the nanowire should cancel the Berry phase and restore the gapless 1D mode[7-8]. However, this signature has been missing in transport experiments reported to date[9-11]. Here, we report measurements of mechanically-exfoliated 3D TI nanowires which exhibit Aharonov-Bohm oscillations consistent with topological surface transport. The use of low-doped, quasi-ballistic devices allows us to observe a minimum conductance at {\Phi} = 0 and a maximum conductance reaching e^2/h at {\Phi} = h/2e near the lowest subband (i.e. the Dirac point), as well as the carrier density dependence of the transport.
  • We report neutron scattering measurements on low energy ($\hbar\omega \sim 5$~meV) magnetic excitations from a series of Fe$_{1+y-z}$(Ni/Cu)$_{z}$Te$_{1-x}$Se$_{x}$ samples which belong to the "11" Fe-chalcogenide family. Our results suggest a strong correlation between the magnetic excitations near (0.5,0.5,0) and the superconducting properties of the system. The low energy magnetic excitations are found to gradually move away from (0.5,0.5,0) to incommensurate positions when superconductivity is suppressed, either by heating or chemical doping, confirming previous observations.
  • Superconducting condensation energy $U_0^{int}$ has been determined by integrating the electronic entropy in various iron pnictide/chalcogenide superconducting systems. It is found that $U_0^{int}\propto T_c^n$ with $n$ = 3 to 4, which is in sharp contrast to the simple BCS prediction $U_0^{BCS}=1/2N_F\Delta_s^2$ with $N_F$ the quasiparticle density of states at the Fermi energy, $\Delta_s$ the superconducting gap. A similar correlation holds if we compute the condensation energy through $U_0^{cal}=3\gamma_n^{eff}\Delta_s^2/4\pi^2k_B^2$ with $\gamma_n^{eff}$ the effective normal state electronic specific heat coefficient. This indicates a general relationship $\gamma_n^{eff} \propto T_c^m$ with $m$ = 1 to 2, which is not predicted by the BCS scheme. A picture based on quantum criticality is proposed to explain this phenomenon.
  • The so-called "strange metal phase" [1] of high temperature (high Tc) superconductors remains at the heart of the high Tc mystery. Better experimental data and insightful theoretical work would improve our understanding of this enigmatic phase. In particular, the recent advance in angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) [2, 3], incorporating low photon energies (about 7 eV), has given a much more refined view of the many body interaction in these materials. Here, we report a new ARPES feature of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+d that we demonstrate to have the key ability to distinguish between different classes of theories of the normal state. This feature---the anomaly in the nodal many body density of states (nMBDOS)---is clearly observed in the low energy ARPES data, but also observed in more conventional high energy ARPES data, when a sufficient temperature range is covered. We show that key characteristics of this anomaly are explained by a strong electron correlation model; the electron-hole asymmetry and the momentum dependent self energy emerge as key required ingredients.
  • Conventional superconductivity is robust against the addition of impurities unless the impurities are magnetic in which case superconductivity is quickly suppressed. Here we present a study of the cuprate superconductor Bi$_2$Sr$_2$Ca$_1$Cu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$ that is intentionally doped with the magnetic impurity, Fe. Through the use of our Tomographic Density of States (TDoS) technique, we find that while the superconducting gap magnitude is essentially unaffected by the inclusion of iron, the onset of superconductivity, T$_{C}$, and the pair-breaking rate are strongly dependent and correlated. These findings suggest that, in the cuprates, the pair-breaking rate is critical to the determination of T$_{C}$ and that magnetic impurities do not disrupt the strength of pairing but rather the lifetime of the pairs.
  • One of the most important properties of topological insulators (TIs) is the helical spin texture of the Dirac surface states, which has been theoretically and experimentally argued to be left-handed helical above the Dirac point and right handed helical below. However, since the spin is not a good quantum number in these strongly spin-orbit coupled systems, this can not be a complete statement, and we must consider the total angular momentum J = L + S that is a contribution of the spin and orbital terms. Using a combination of orbital and spin-resolved angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we show a direct link between the different orbital and spin components, with a "backwards" spin texture directly observed for the in-plane orbital states of Bi2Se3.
  • Topological insulators are novel macroscopic quantum-mechanical phase of matter, which hold promise for realizing some of the most exotic particles in physics as well as application towards spintronics and quantum computation. In all the known topological insulators, strong spin-orbit coupling is critical for the generation of the protected massless surface states. Consequently, a complete description of the Dirac state should include both the spin and orbital (spatial) parts of the wavefunction. For the family of materials with a single Dirac cone, theories and experiments agree qualitatively, showing the topological state has a chiral spin texture that changes handedness across the Dirac point (DP), but they differ quantitatively on how the spin is polarized. Limited existing theoretical ideas predict chiral local orbital angular momentum on the two sides of the DP. However, there have been neither direct measurements nor calculations identifying the global symmetry of the spatial wavefunction. Here we present the first results from angle-resolved photoemission experiment and first-principles calculation that both show, counter to current predictions, the in-plane orbital wavefunctions for the surface states of Bi2Se3 are asymmetric relative to the DP, switching from being tangential to the k-space constant energy surfaces above DP, to being radial to them below the DP. Because the orbital texture switch occurs exactly at the DP this effect should be intrinsic to the topological physics, constituting an essential yet missing aspect in the description of the topological Dirac state. Our results also indicate that the spin texture may be more complex than previously reported, helping to reconcile earlier conflicting spin resolved measurements.