• We gathered more than 1130 high-resolution optical spectra for more than 250 Galactic classical Cepheids. The spectra were collected with different optical spectrographs: UVES at VLT, HARPS at 3.6m, FEROS at 2.2m MPG/ESO, and STELLA. To improve the effective temperature estimates, we present more than 150 new line depth ratio (LDR) calibrations that together with similar calibrations already available in the literature allowed us to cover a broad range in wavelength (between 5348 and 8427 angstrom) and in effective temperatures (between 3500 and 7700 K). This means the unique opportunity to cover both the hottest and coolest phases along the Cepheid pulsation cycle and to limit the intrinsic error on individual measurements at the level of ~100 K. Thanks to the high signal-to-noise ratio of individual spectra we identified and measured hundreds of neutral and ionized lines of heavy elements, and in turn, have the opportunity to trace the variation of both surface gravity and microturbulent velocity along the pulsation cycle. The accuracy of the physical parameters and the number of Fe I (more than one hundred) and Fe II (more than ten) lines measured allowed us to estimate mean iron abundances with a precision better than 0.1 dex. Here we focus on 14 calibrating Cepheids for which the current spectra cover either the entire or a significant portion of the pulsation cycle. The current estimates of the variation of the physical parameters along the pulsation cycle and of the iron abundances agree quite well with similar estimates available in the literature. Independent homogeneous estimates of both physical parameters and metal abundances based on different approaches that can constrain possible systematics are highly encouraged.
  • The projection factor p is the key quantity used in the Baade-Wesselink (BW) method for distance determination; it converts radial velocities into pulsation velocities. Several methods are used to determine p, such as geometrical and hydrodynamical models or the inverse BW approach when the distance is known. We analyze new HARPS-N spectra of delta Cep to measure its cycle-averaged atmospheric velocity gradient in order to better constrain the projection factor. We first apply the inverse BW method to derive p directly from observations. The projection factor can be divided into three subconcepts: (1) a geometrical effect (p0); (2) the velocity gradient within the atmosphere (fgrad); and (3) the relative motion of the optical pulsating photosphere with respect to the corresponding mass elements (fo-g). We then measure the fgrad value of delta Cep for the first time. When the HARPS-N mean cross-correlated line-profiles are fitted with a Gaussian profile, the projection factor is pcc-g = 1.239 +/- 0.034(stat) +/- 0.023(syst). When we consider the different amplitudes of the radial velocity curves that are associated with 17 selected spectral lines, we measure projection factors ranging from 1.273 to 1.329. We find a relation between fgrad and the line depth measured when the Cepheid is at minimum radius. This relation is consistent with that obtained from our best hydrodynamical model of delta Cep and with our projection factor decomposition. Using the observational values of p and fgrad found for the 17 spectral lines, we derive a semi-theoretical value of fo-g. We alternatively obtain fo-g = 0.975+/-0.002 or 1.006+/-0.002 assuming models using radiative transfer in plane-parallel or spherically symmetric geometries, respectively. The new HARPS-N observations of delta Cep are consistent with our decomposition of the projection factor.
  • The B-W method is used to determine the distance of Cepheids and consists in combining the angular size variations of the star, as derived from infrared surface-brightness relations or interferometry, with its linear size variation, as deduced from visible spectroscopy using the projection factor. While many Cepheids have been intensively observed by infrared beam combiners, only a few have been observed in the visible. This paper is part of a project to observe Cepheids in the visible with interferometry as a counterpart to infrared observations already in hand. Observations of delta Cep itself were secured with the VEGA/CHARA instrument over the full pulsation cycle of the star. These visible interferometric data are consistent in first approximation with a quasi-hydrostatic model of pulsation surrounded by a static circumstellar environment (CSE) with a size of theta_cse=8.9 +/- 3.0 mas and a relative flux contribution of f_cse=0.07+/-0.01. A model of visible nebula (a background source filling the field of view of the interferometer) with the same relative flux contribution is also consistent with our data at small spatial frequencies. However, in both cases, we find discrepancies in the squared visibilities at high spatial frequencies (maximum 2sigma) with two different regimes over the pulsation cycle of the star, phi=0.0-0.8 and phi=0.8-1.0. We provide several hypotheses to explain these discrepancies, but more observations and theoretical investigations are necessary before a firm conclusion can be drawn. For the first time we have been able to detect in the visible domain a resolved structure around delta~Cep. We have also shown that a simple model cannot explain the observations, and more work will be necessary in the future, both on observations and modelling.
  • We present 947 radial velocities of RR Lyrae variable stars in four fields located toward the Galactic bulge, observed within the data from the ongoing Bulge RR Lyrae Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA-RR). We show that these RR Lyrae stars exhibit hot kinematics and null or negligible rotation and are therefore members of a separate population from the bar/pseudobulge that currently dominates the mass and luminosity of the inner Galaxy. Our RR Lyrae stars predate these structures, and have metallicities, kinematics, and spatial distribution that are consistent with a "classical" bulge, although we cannot yet completely rule out the possibility that they are the metal-poor tail of a more metal rich ([Fe/H] ~ -1 dex) halo-bulge population. The complete catalog of radial velocities for the BRAVA-RR stars is also published electronically.
  • Our aim is to precisely measure the physical parameters of the eclipsing binary IO Aqr and derive a distance to this system by applying a surface brightness - colour relation. Our motivation is to combine these parameters with future precise distance determinations from the GAIA space mission to derive precise surface brightness - colour relations for stars. We extensively used photometry from the Super-WASP and ASAS projects and precise radial velocities obtained from HARPS and CORALIE high-resolution spectra. We analysed light curves with the code JKTEBOP and radial velocity curves with the Wilson-Devinney program. We found that IO Aqr is a hierarchical triple system consisting of a double-lined short-period (P=2.37 d) spectroscopic binary and a low-luminosity and low-mass companion star orbiting the binary with a period of ~25000 d (~70 yr) on a very eccentric orbit. We derive high-precision (better than 1%) physical parameters of the inner binary, which is composed of two slightly evolved main-sequence stars (F5 V-IV + F6 V-IV) with masses of M1=1.569+/-0.004 and M2=1.655+/-0.004 M_sun and radii R1=2.19+/-0.02 and R2=2.49+/-0.02 R_sun. The companion is most probably a late K-type dwarf with mass ~0.6 M_sun. The distance to the system resulting from applying a (V-K) surface brightness - colour relation is 255+/-6(stat.)+/-6(sys.) pc, which agrees well with the Hipparcos value of 270+/-73 pc, but is more precise by a factor of eight.
  • PEPSI is the bench-mounted, two-arm, fibre-fed and stabilized Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument for the 2x8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). Three spectral resolutions of either 43 000, 120 000 or 270 000 can cover the entire optical/red wavelength range from 383 to 907 nm in three exposures. Two 10.3kx10.3k CCDs with 9-{\mu}m pixels and peak quantum efficiencies of 96 % record a total of 92 echelle orders. We introduce a new variant of a wave-guide image slicer with 3, 5, and 7 slices and peak efficiencies between 96 %. A total of six cross dispersers cover the six wavelength settings of the spectrograph, two of them always simultaneously. These are made of a VPH-grating sandwiched by two prisms. The peak efficiency of the system, including the telescope, is 15% at 650 nm, and still 11% and 10% at 390 nm and 900 nm, respectively. In combination with the 110 m2 light-collecting capability of the LBT, we expect a limiting magnitude of 20th mag in V in the low-resolution mode. The R=120 000 mode can also be used with two, dual-beam Stokes IQUV polarimeters. The 270 000-mode is made possible with the 7-slice image slicer and a 100- {\mu}m fibre through a projected sky aperture of 0.74", comparable to the median seeing of the LBT site. The 43000-mode with 12-pixel sampling per resolution element is our bad seeing or faint-object mode. Any of the three resolution modes can either be used with sky fibers for simultaneous sky exposures or with light from a stabilized Fabry-Perot etalon for ultra-precise radial velocities. CCD-image processing is performed with the dedicated data-reduction and analysis package PEPSI-S4S. A solar feed makes use of PEPSI during day time and a 500-m feed from the 1.8 m VATT can be used when the LBT is busy otherwise. In this paper, we present the basic instrument design, its realization, and its characteristics.
  • We have obtained extensive high-quality spectroscopic observations of the OGLE-LMC-CEP-1718 eclipsing binary system in the Large Magellanic Cloud which Soszynski et al. (2008) had identified as a candidate system for containing two classical Cepheids in orbit. Our spectroscopic data clearly demonstrate binary motion of the Cepheids in a 413-day eccentric orbit, rendering this eclipsing binary system the first ever known to consist of two classical Cepheid variables. After disentangling the four different radial velocity variations in the system we present the orbital solution and the individual pulsational radial velocity curves of the Cepheids. We show that both Cepheids are extremely likely to be first overtone pulsators and determine their respective dynamical masses, which turn out to be equal to within 1.5 %. Since the secondary eclipse is not observed in the orbital light curve we cannot derive the individual radii of the Cepheids, but the sum of their radii derived from the photometry is consistent with overtone pulsation for both variables. The existence of two equal-mass Cepheids in a binary system having different pulsation periods (1.96 and 2.48 days, respectively) may pose an interesting challenge to stellar evolution and pulsation theories, and a more detailed study of this system using additional datasets should yield deeper insight about the physics of stellar evolution of Cepheid variables. Future analysis of the system using additional near-infrared photometry might also lead to a better understanding of the systematic uncertainties in current Baade-Wesselink techniques of distance determinations to Cepheid variables.
  • The projection factor used in the Baade-Wesselink methods of determining the distance of Cepheids makes the link between the stellar physics and the cosmological distance scale. A coherent picture of this physical quantity is now provided based on several approaches. We present the lastest news on the expected projection factor for different kinds of pulsating stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram.
  • A novel method of analysis of double-lined eclipsing binaries containing a radially pulsating star is presented. The combined pulsating-eclipsing light curve is built up from a purely eclipsing light curve grid created using an existing modeling tool. For every pulsation phase the instantaneous radius and surface brightness are taken into account, being calculated from the disentangled radial velocity curve of the pulsating star and from its out-of-eclipse pulsational light curve and the light ratio of the components, respectively. The best model is found using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. The method is applied to the eclipsing binary Cepheid OGLE-LMC-CEP-0227 (P_puls = 3.80 d, P_orb = 309 d). We analyze a set of new spectroscopic and photometric observations for this binary, simultaneously fitting OGLE V-band, I-band and Spitzer 3.6 {\mu}m photometry. We derive a set of fundamental parameters of the system significantly improving the precision comparing to the previous results obtained by our group. The Cepheid mass and radius are M_1 = 4.165 +/- 0.032 M_solar and R_1 = 34.92 +/- 0.34 R_solar, respectively. For the first time a direct, geometrical and distance-independent determination of the Cepheid projection factor is presented. The value p = 1.21 +/- 0.03(stat.) +/- 0.04(syst.) is consistent with theoretical expectations for a short period Cepheid and interferometric measurements for {\delta} Cep. We also find a very high value of the optical limb darkening coefficients for the Cepheid component, in strong disagreement with theoretical predictions for static atmospheres at a given surface temperature and gravity.
  • In the era of precision cosmology it is essential to determine the Hubble Constant with an accuracy of 3% or better. Currently, its uncertainty is dominated by the uncertainty in the distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) which as the second nearest galaxy serves as the best anchor point of the cosmic distance scale. Observations of eclipsing binaries offer a unique opportunity to precisely and accurately measure stellar parameters and distances. The eclipsing binary method was previously applied to the LMC but the accuracy of the distance results was hampered by the need to model the bright, early-type systems used in these studies. Here, we present distance determinations to eight long-period, late- type eclipsing systems in the LMC composed of cool giant stars. For such systems we can accurately measure both the linear and angular sizes of their components and avoid the most important problems related to the hot early-type systems. Our LMC distance derived from these systems is demonstrably accurate to 2.2 % (49.97 +/- 0.19 (statistical) +/- 1.11 (systematic) kpc) providing a firm base for a 3 % determination of the Hubble Constant, with prospects for improvement to 2 % in the future.
  • RR Lyrae pulsating stars have been extensively used as tracers of old stellar populations for the purpose of determining the ages of galaxies, and as tools to measure distances to nearby galaxies. There was accordingly considerable interest when the RR Lyr star OGLE-BLG-RRLYR-02792 was found to be a member in an eclipsing binary system4, as the mass of the pulsator (hitherto constrained only by models) could be unambiguously determined. Here we report that RRLYR-02792 has a mass of 0.26 M_sun and therefore cannot be a classical RR Lyrae star. Through models we find that its properties are best explained by the evolution of a close binary system that started with 1.4 M_sun and 0.8 M_sun stars orbiting each other with an initial period of 2.9 days. Mass exchange over 5.4 Gyr produced the observed system, which is now in a very short-lived phase where the physical properties of the pulsator happen to place it in the same instability strip of the H-R diagram occupied by RR Lyrae stars. We estimate that samples of RR Lyr stars may contain a 0.2 percent contamination with systems similar to this one, implying that distances measured with RR Lyrae stars should not be significantly affected by these binary interlopers.
  • We used Optical, Near Infrared photometry and radial velocity data for a sample of 11 Cepheids belonging to the young LMC blue populous cluster NGC 1866 to estimate their radii and distances on the basis of the CORS Baade-Wesselink method. This technique, based on an accurate calibration of the surface brightness as a function of (U-B), (V-K) colors, allows us to estimate, simultaneously, the linear radius and the angular diameter of Cepheid variables, and consequently to derive their distance. A rigorous error estimate on radius and distances was derived by using Monte Carlo simulations. Our analysis gives a distance modulus for NGC 1866 of 18.51+/-0.03 mag, which is in agreement with several independent results.
  • Context. Recent observations of LMC Cepheids bring new constraints on the slope of the period-projection factor relation (hereafter Pp relation) that is currently used in the Baade-Wesselink (hereafter BW) method of distance determination. The discrepancy between observations and theoretical analysis is particularly significant for short period Cepheids Aims. We investigate three physical effects that might possibly explain this discrepancy: (1) the spectroscopic S/N that is systematically lower for LMC Cepheids (around 10) compared to Galactic ones (up to 300), (2) the impact of the metallicity on the dynamical structure of LMC Cepheids, and (3) the combination of infrared photometry/interferometry with optical spectroscopy. Methods. To study the S/N we use a very simple toy model of Cepheids. The impact of metallicity on the projection factor is based on the hydrodynamical model of delta Cep already described in previous studies. This model is also used to derive the position of the optical versus infrared photospheric layers. Results. We find no significant effect of S/N, metallicity, and optical-versus-infrared observations on the Pp relation. Conclusions. The Pp relation of Cepheids in the LMC does not differ from the Galactic relation. This allows its universal application to determine distances to extragalactic Cepheids via BW analysis.
  • We have analyzed the double-lined eclipsing binary system OGLE-LMC-CEP-1812 in the LMC and demonstrate that it contains a classical fundamental mode Cepheid pulsating with a period of 1.31 days. The secondary star is a stable giant. We derive the dynamical masses for both stars with an accuracy of 1.5%, making the Cepheid in this system the second classical Cepheid with a very accurate dynamical mass determination, following the OGLE-LMC-CEP-0227 system studied by Pietrzynski et al. (2010). The measured dynamical mass agrees very well with that predicted by pulsation models. We also derive the radii of both components and accurate orbital parameters for the binary system. This new, very accurate dynamical mass for a classical Cepheid will greatly contribute to the solution of the Cepheid mass discrepancy problem, and to our understanding of the structure and evolution of classical Cepheids.
  • The extragalactic distance scale builds directly on the Cepheid Period-Luminosity (PL) relation as delineated by the sample of Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). However, the LMC is a dwarf irregular galaxy, quite different from the massive spiral galaxies used for calibrating the extragalactic distance scale. Recent investigations suggest that not only the zero-point but also the slope of the Milky Way PL relation differ significantly from that of the LMC, casting doubts on the universality of the Cepheid PL relation. We want to make a differential comparison of the PL relations in the two galaxies by delineating the PL relations using the same method, the infrared surface brightness method (IRSB), and the same precepts. The IRSB method is a Baade-Wesselink type method to determine individual distances to Cepheids. We apply a newly revised calibration of the method as described in an accompanying paper (Paper I) to 36 LMC and five SMC Cepheids and delineate new PL relations in the V,I,J, & K bands as well as in the Wesenheit indices in the optical and near-IR. We present 509 new and accurate radial velocity measurements for a sample of 22 LMC Cepheids, enlarging our earlier sample of 14 stars to include 36 LMC Cepheids. The new calibration of the IRSB method is directly tied to the recent HST parallax measurements to ten Milky Way Cepheids, and we find a LMC barycenter distance modulus of 18.45+-0.04 (random error only) from the 36 individual LMC Cepheid distances. We find a significant metallicity effect on the Wvi index gamma(Wvi)=-0.23+-0.10 mag/dex as well as an effect on the slope. The K-band PL relation on the other hand is found to be an excellent extragalactic standard candle being metallicity insensitive in both slope and zero-point and at the same time being reddening insensitive and showing the least internal dispersion.
  • We determine Period-Luminosity relations for Milky Way Cepheids in the optical and near-IR bands. These relations can be used directly as reference for extra-galactic distance determination to Cepheid populations with solar metallicity, and they form the basis for a direct comparison with relations obtained in exactly the same manner for stars in the Magellanic Clouds, presented in an accompanying paper. In that paper we show that the metallicity effect is very small and consistent with a null effect, particularly in the near-IR bands, and we combine here all 111 Cepheids from the Milky Way, the LMC and SMC to form a best relation. We employ the near-IR surface brightness (IRSB) method to determine direct distances to the individual Cepheids after we have recalibrated the projection factor using the recent parallax measurements to ten Galactic Cepheids and the constraint that Cepheid distances to the LMC should be independent of pulsation period. We confirm our earlier finding that the projection factor for converting radial velocity to pulsational velocity depends quite steeply on pulsation period, p=1.550-0.186*log(P) in disagrement with recent theoretical predictions. We delineate the Cepheid PL relation using 111 Cepheids with direct distances from the IRSB analysis. The relations are by construction in agreement with the recent HST parallax distances to Cepheids and slopes are in excellent agreement with the slopes of apparent magnitudes versus period observed in the LMC.
  • We present new and accurate near-infrared (NIR) J, K-band time series data for the Galactic globular cluster (GC) M5 = NGC5904. Data were collected with SOFI at the NTT (71 J + 120 K images) and with NICS at the TNG (25 J + 22 K images) and cover two orthogonal strips across the center of the cluster of \approx 5 \times 10 arcmin^{2} each. These data allowed us to derive accurate mean K-band magnitudes for 52 fundamental (RR_{ab}) and 24 first overtone (RR_{c}) RR Lyrae stars. Using this sample of RR Lyrae stars, we find that the slope of the K-band Period Luminosity (PLK) relation (-2.33 \pm 0.08) agrees quite well with similar estimates available in the literature. We also find, using both theoretical and empirical calibrations of the PLK relation, a true distance to M5 of (14.44 \pm 0.02) mag. This distance modulus agrees very well (1\sigma) with distances based on main sequence fitting method and on kinematic method (14.44 \pm 0.41 mag, \citealt{rees_1996}), while is systematically smaller than the distance based on the white dwarf cooling sequence (14.67 \pm 0.18 mag, \citealt{layden2005}), even if with a difference slightly larger than 1\sigma. The true distance modulus to M5 based on the PLJ relation (14.50 \pm 0.08 mag) is in quite good agreement with the distance based on the PLK relation further supporting the use of NIR PL relations for RR Lyrae stars to improve the precision of the GC distance scale.
  • We present new deep and accurate space (Advanced Camera for Surveys -- Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 at the Hubble Space Telescope) and ground-based (Suprime-Cam at Subaru Telescope, Mega-Cam at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) photometric and astrometric data for the Local Group dwarf irregular IC10. We confirm the significant decrease of the young stellar population when moving from the center toward the outermost regions. We find that the tidal radius of IC10 is significantly larger than previous estimates of $r_t \lesssim$ 10\min. By using the $I$,\vmi\ Color Magnitude Diagram based on the Suprime-Cam data we detect sizable samples of red giant (RG) stars up to radial distances of 18-23$'$ from the galactic center. The ratio between observed star counts (Mega-Cam data) across the tip of the RG branch and star counts predicted by Galactic models indicate a star count excess at least at a 3$\sigma$ level up to 34-42\min\ from the center. This finding supports the hypothesis that the huge H{\size{I}} cloud covering more than one degree across the galaxy is associated with IC10 \citep{huchtmeier79,cohen79}. We also provide new estimates of the total luminosity ($L_V\sim9\times$$10^7$ $L_\odot$, $M_V$$\sim$-15.1 mag) that agrees with similar estimates available in the literature. If we restrict to the regions where rotational velocity measurements are available (r$\approx13'$), we find a mass-to-light ratio ($\sim$10 $M_\odot$ $L_\odot$) that is at least one order of magnitude larger than previous estimates. The new estimate should be cautiously treated, since it is based on a minimal fraction of the body of the galaxy.
  • The cross correlation method (hereafter CC) is widely used to derive the radial velocity curve of Cepheids when the signal to noise of the spectra is low. However, if it is used with the wrong projection factor, it might introduce some biases in the Baade-Wesselink (hereafter BW) methods of determining the distance of Cepheids. In addition, it might affect the average value of the radial velocity curve (or gamma-velocity) important for Galactic structure studies. We aim to derive a period-projection factor relation (hereafter Pp) appropriate to be used together with the CC method. Moreover, we investigate whether the CC method can explain the misunderstood previous calculation of the K-term of Cepheids. We observed eight galactic Cepheids with the HARPS spectrograph. For each star, we derive an interpolated CC radial velocity curve using the HARPS pipeline. The amplitudes of these curves are used to determine the correction to be applied to the semi-theoretical projection factor derived in Nardetto et al. (2007). Their average value (or gamma-velocity) are also compared to the center-of-mass velocities derived in Nardetto et al. (2008). The correction in amplitudes allows us to derive a new Pp relation: p = [-0.08+-0.05] log P +[1.31+-0.06]. We also find a negligible wavelength dependence (over the optical range) of the Pp relation. We finally show that the gamma-velocity derived from the CC method is systematically blue-shifted by about 1.0 +- 0.2km/s compared to the center-of-mass velocity of the star. An additional blue-shift of 1.0km/s is thus needed to totally explain the previous calculation of the K-term of Cepheids (around 2km/s). The new Pp relation we derived is a solid tool for the distance scale calibration (abridged).
  • We have obtained deep near-infrared images in J and K filters of four fields in the Sculptor Group spiral galaxy NGC 247 with the ESO VLT and ISAAC camera. For a sample of ten Cepheids in these fields, previously discovered by Garc{\'i}a-Varela et al. from optical wide-field images, we have determined mean J and K magnitudes and have constructed the period-luminosity (PL) relations in these bands. Using the near-infrared PL relations together with those in the optical V and I bands, we have determined a true distance modulus for NGC 247 of 27.64 mag, with a random uncertainty of $\pm$2% and a systematic uncertainty of $\sim$4% which is dominated by the effect of unresolved stars on the Cepheid photometry. The mean reddening affecting the NGC 247 Cepheids of E(B-V) = 0.18 $\pm$ 0.02 mag is mostly produced in the host galaxy itself and is significantly higher than what was found in the previous optical Cepheid studies in NGC 247 of our own group, and Madore et al., leading to a 7% decrease in the previous optical Cepheid distance. As in other studies of our project, the distance modulus of NGC 247 we report is tied to an assumed LMC distance modulus of 18.50. Comparison with other distance measurements to NGC 247 shows that the present IR-based Cepheid distance is the most accurate among these determinations. With a distance of 3.4 Mpc, NGC 247 is about 1.5 Mpc more distant than NGC 55 and NGC 300, two other Sculptor Group spirals analyzed before with the same technique by our group.
  • (abridged) Deep multi-epoch Sloan Digital Sky Survey data in a 275 square degrees area along the celestial equator (SDSS stripe 82 = S82) allowed us to search for extremely faint ($i>21$) objects with proper motions larger than 0.14 arcsec/yr. We classify 38 newly detected objects with low-resolution optical spectroscopy using FORS1 @ ESO VLT. All 22 previously known L dwarfs in S82 have been detected in our high proper motion survey. However, 11 of the known L dwarfs have smaller proper motions (0.01$<$$\mu$$<$0.14 arcsec/yr). Although S82 was already one of the best investigated sky regions with respect to L and T dwarfs, we are able to classify 13 new L dwarfs. We have also found eight new M7.5-M9.5 dwarfs. Four new cool white dwarfs (CWDs) discovered by us are about 1-2 mag fainter than those previously detected in SDSS data. All new L-type, late-M and CWD objects show thick disk and halo kinematics. There are 13 objects, mostly with uncertain proper motions, which we initially classified as mid-M dwarfs. Among them we have found 9 with an alternative subdwarf classification (sdM7 or earlier types), whereas we have not found any new spectra resembling the known ultracool ($>$sdM7) subdwarfs. Some M subdwarf candidates have been classified based on spectral indices with large uncertainties. We failed to detect new nearby ($d<50$ pc) L dwarfs, probably because the S82 area was already well-investigated before. With our survey we have demonstrated a higher efficiency in finding Galactic halo CWDs than previous searches. The space density of halo CWDs is according to our results about 1.5-3.0 $\times$ 10$^{-5}$ pc$^{-3}$.
  • In the distant universe X-ray luminous clusters of galaxies are rare objects. Large area surveys are therefore needed to probe the high luminosity end of the cluster population at redshifts z >= 1. We correlated extended X-ray sources from the second XMM-Newton source catalogue (2XMM) with the SDSS in order to identify new clusters of galaxies. Distant cluster candidates in empty SDSS fields were imaged in the R and z bands with the Large Binocular Telescope. We extracted the X-ray spectra of the cluster candidates and fitted thermal plasma models to the data. We determined the redshift 0.99 +-0.03 for 2XMM J083026+524133 from its X-ray spectrum. With a bolometric luminosity of 1.8 x 10^45 erg/sec this is the most X-ray luminous cluster at redshifts z >= 1. We measured a gas temperature of 8.2 +- 0.9 keV and and estimate a cluster mass M(500) = 5.6 x 10^14 M(solar). The optical imaging revealed a rich cluster of galaxies.
  • We have obtained deep images in the near-infrared J and K filters for several fields in the Local Group galaxy WLM. We report intensity mean magnitudes for 31 Cepheids located in these fields which we previously discovered in a wide-field optical imaging survey of WLM. The data define tight period-luminosity relations in both near-infrared bands which we use to derive the total reddening of the Cepheids in WLM and the true distance modulus of the galaxy from a multiwavelength analysis of the reddened distance moduli in the VIJK bands. From this, we obtain the values E(B-V) = 0.082 $\pm$ 0.02, and $(m-M)_{0} = 24.924 \pm 0.042$ mag, with a systematic uncertainty in the distance of about $\pm$ 3%. This Cepheid distance agrees extremely well with the distance of WLM determined from the I-band TRGB method by ourselves and others. Most of the reddening of the Cepheids in WLM (0.06 mag) is produced inside the galaxy, demonstrating again the need for an accurate determination of the total reddening and/or the use of infrared photometry to derive Cepheid distances which are accurate to 3% or better, even for small irregular galaxies like WLM.
  • We have obtained single-phase near-infrared magnitudes in the J and K bands for a sample of 78 RR Lyrae stars in the Sculptor dSph galaxy. Applying different theoretical and empirical calibrations of the period-luminosity-metallicity relation for RR Lyrae stars in the infrared, we find consistent results and obtain a true, reddening-corrected distance modulus of 19.67 $\pm$ 0.02 (statistical) $\pm$ 0.12 (systematic) mag for Sculptor from our data. This distance value is consistent with the value of 19.68 $\pm$ 0.08 mag which we obtain from earlier V-band data of RR Lyrae stars in Sculptor, and the V magnitude-metallicity calibration of Sandage (1993). It is also in a very good agreement with the results obtain by Rizzi (2002) based on tip of the red giant branch (TRGB, 19.64 $\pm$ 0.08 mag) and horizontal branch (HB, 19.66 $\pm$ 0.15 mag).
  • The universality of the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relations has been under discussion since metallicity effects have been assumed to play a role in the value of the intercept and, more recently, of the slope of these relations. The goal of the present study is to calibrate the Galactic PL relations in various photometric bands (from B to K) and to compare the results to the well-established PL relations in the LMC. We use a set of 59 calibrating stars, the distances of which are measured using five different distance indicators: Hubble Space Telescope and revised Hipparcos parallaxes, infrared surface brightness and interferometric Baade-Wesselink parallaxes, and classical Zero-Age-Main-Sequence-fitting parallaxes for Cepheids belonging to open clusters or OB stars associations. A detailed discussion of absorption corrections and projection factor to be used is given. We find no significant difference in the slopes of the PL relations between LMC and our Galaxy. We conclude that the Cepheid PL relations have universal slopes in all photometric bands, not depending on the galaxy under study (at least for LMC and Milky Way). The possible zero-point variation with metal content is not discussed in the present work, but an upper limit of 18.50 for the LMC distance modulus can be deduced from our data.