• Using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have obtained a direct trigonometric parallax for the nearest metal-poor globular cluster, NGC 6397. Although trigonometric parallaxes have been previously measured for many nearby open clusters, this is the first parallax for an ancient metal-poor population -- one that is used as a fundamental template in many stellar population studies. This high-precision measurement was enabled by the HST/WFC3 spatial-scanning mode, providing hundreds of astrometric measurements for dozens of stars in the cluster and also for Galactic field stars along the same sightline. We find a parallax of 0.418 +/- 0.013 +/- 0.018 mas (statistical, systematic), corresponding to a true distance modulus of 11.89 +/- 0.07 +/- 0.09 mag (2.39 +/- 0.07 +/- 0.10 kpc). The V luminosity at the stellar main sequence turnoff implies an absolute cluster age of 13.4 +/- 0.7 +/- 1.2 Gyr.
  • We report on the results of the multiwavelength campaign carried out after the discovery of the INTEGRAL transient IGR J17329-2731. The optical data collected with the SOAR telescope allowed us to identify the donor star in this system as a late M giant at a distance of 2.7$^{+3.4}_{-1.2}$ kpc. The data collected quasi-simultaneously with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR showed the presence of a modulation with a period of 6680$\pm$3 s in the X-ray light curves of the source. This unveils that the compact object hosted in this system is a slowly rotating neutron star. The broadband X-ray spectrum showed the presence of a strong absorption ($\gg$10$^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$) and prominent emission lines at 6.4 keV, and 7.1 keV. These features are usually found in wind-fed systems, in which the emission lines result from the fluorescence of the X-rays from the accreting compact object on the surrounding stellar wind. The presence of a strong absorption line around $\sim$21 keV in the NuSTAR spectrum suggests a cyclotron origin, thus allowing us to estimate the neutron star magnetic field as $\sim$2.4$\times$10$^{12}$ G. All evidence thus suggests IGR J17329-2731 is a symbiotic X-ray binary. As no X-ray emission was ever observed from the location of IGR J17329-2731 by INTEGRAL (or other X-ray facilities) during the past 15 yr in orbit and considering that symbiotic X-ray binaries are known to be variable but persistent X-ray sources, we concluded that INTEGRAL caught the first detectable X-ray emission from IGR J17329-2731 when the source shined as a symbiotic X-ray binary. The Swift/XRT monitoring performed up to $\sim$3 months after the discovery of the source, showed that it maintained a relatively stable X-ray flux and spectral properties.
  • Intermediate-age star clusters in the LMC present extended main sequence turnoffs (MSTO) that have been attributed to either multiple stellar populations or an effect of stellar rotation. Recently it has been proposed that these extended main sequences can also be produced by ill-characterized stellar variability. Here we present Gemini-S/GMOS time series observations of the intermediate-age cluster NGC 1846. Using differential image analysis, we identified 73 new variable stars, with 55 of those being of the Delta Scuti type, that is, pulsating variables close the MSTO for the cluster age. Considering completeness and background contamination effects we estimate the number of Delta Scuti belonging to the cluster between 40 and 60 members, although this number is based on the detection of a single Delta Scuti within the cluster half-light radius. This amount of variable stars at the MSTO level will not produce significant broadening of the MSTO, albeit higher resolution imaging will be needed to rule out variable stars as a major contributor to the extended MSTO phenomenon. Though modest, this amount of Delta Scuti makes NGC 1846 the star cluster with the highest number of these variables ever discovered. Lastly, our results are a cautionary tale about the adequacy of shallow variability surveys in the LMC (like OGLE) to derive properties of its Delta Scuti population.
  • To confirm the nature of the donor star in the ultra-compact X-ray binary candidate 47 Tuc X9, we obtained optical spectra (3,000$-$10,000 {\AA}) with the Hubble Space Telescope / Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. We find no strong emission or absorption features in the spectrum of X9. In particular, we place $3\sigma$ upper limits on the H$\alpha$ and HeII $\lambda 4686$ emission line equivalent widths $-$EW$_{\mathrm{H\alpha}} \lesssim 14$ {\AA} and $-$EW$_{\mathrm{HeII}} \lesssim 9$ {\AA}, respectively. This is much lower than seen for typical X-ray binaries at a similar X-ray luminosity (which, for $L_{\mathrm{2-10 keV}} \approx 10^{33}-10^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$ is typically $-$EW$_{\mathrm{H\alpha}} \sim 50$ {\AA}). This supports our previous suggestion (by Bahramian et al.) of an H-poor donor in X9. We perform timing analysis on archival far-ultraviolet, $V$ and $I$-band data to search for periodicities. In the optical bands we recover the seven-day superorbital period initially discovered in X-rays, but we do not recover the orbital period. In the far-ultraviolet we find evidence for a 27.2 min period (shorter than the 28.2 min period seen in X-rays). We find that either a neutron star or black hole could explain the observed properties of X9. We also perform binary evolution calculations, showing that the formation of an initial black hole / He-star binary early in the life of a globular cluster could evolve into a present-day system such as X9 (should the compact object in this system indeed be a black hole) via mass-transfer driven by gravitational wave radiation.
  • We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array radio frequency observations of the new accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP), IGR J16597$-$3704, located in the globular cluster NGC 6256. With these data, we detect a radio counterpart to IGR J16597$-$3704, and determine an improved source position. Pairing our radio observations with quasi-simultaneous Swift/XRT X-ray observations, we place IGR J16597$-$3704 on the radio -- X-ray luminosity plane, where we find that IGR J16597$-$3704 is one of the more radio-quiet neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries known to date. We discuss the mechanisms that may govern radio luminosity (and in turn jet production and evolution) in AMXPs. Further, we use our derived radio position to search for a counterpart in archival Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory data, and estimate an upper limit on the X-ray luminosity of IGR J16597$-$3704 during quiescence.
  • We present optical and ultraviolet spectra of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave (GW) source, the binary neutron star merger GW170817. Spectra were obtained nightly between 1.5 and 9.5 days post-merger, using the SOAR and Magellan telescopes; the UV spectrum was obtained with the \textit{Hubble Space Telescope} at 5.5 days. Our data reveal a rapidly-fading blue component ($T\approx5500$ K at 1.5 days) that quickly reddens; spectra later than $\gtrsim 4.5$ days peak beyond the optical regime. The spectra are mostly featureless, although we identify a possible weak emission line at $\sim 7900$ \AA\ at $t\lesssim 4.5$ days. The colours, rapid evolution and featureless spectrum are consistent with a "blue" kilonova from polar ejecta comprised mainly of light $r$-process nuclei with atomic mass number $A\lesssim 140$. This indicates a sight-line within $\theta_{\rm obs}\lesssim 45^{\circ}$ of the orbital axis. Comparison to models suggests $\sim0.03$ M$_\odot$ of blue ejecta, with a velocity of $\sim 0.3c$. The required lanthanide fraction is $\sim 10^{-4}$, but this drops to $<10^{-5}$ in the outermost ejecta. The large velocities point to a dynamical origin, rather than a disk wind, for this blue component, suggesting that both binary constituents are neutron stars (as opposed to a binary consisting of a neutron star and a black hole). For dynamical ejecta, the high mass favors a small neutron star radius of $\lesssim 12$ km. This mass also supports the idea that neutron star mergers are a major contributor to $r$-process nucleosynthesis.
  • We report on multiwavelength observations of nova SMCN 2016-10a. The present observational set is one of the most comprehensive for any nova in the Small Magellanic Cloud, including: low, medium, and high resolution optical spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry from SALT, FLOYDS, and SOAR; long-term OGLE $V$- and $I$- bands photometry dating back to six years before eruption; SMARTS optical and near-IR photometry from $\sim$ 11 days until over 280 days post-eruption; $Swift$ satellite X-ray and ultraviolet observations from $\sim$ 6 days until 319 days post-eruption. The progenitor system contains a bright disk and a main sequence or a sub-giant secondary. The nova is very fast with $t_2 \simeq$ 4.0 $\pm$ 1.0 d and $t_3 \simeq$ 7.8 $\pm$ 2.0 d in the $V$-band. If the nova is in the SMC, at a distance of $\sim$ 61 $\pm$ 10 kpc, we derive $M_{V,\mathrm{max}} \simeq - 10.5$ $\pm$ 0.5, making it the brightest nova ever discovered in the SMC and one of the brightest on record. At day 5 post-eruption the spectral lines show a He/N spectroscopic class and a FWHM of $\sim$ 3500 kms$^{-1}$ indicating moderately high ejection velocities. The nova entered the nebular phase $\sim$ 20 days post-eruption, predicting the imminent super-soft source turn-on in the X-rays, which started $\sim$ 28 days post-eruption. The super-soft source properties indicate a white dwarf mass between 1.2 M$_{\odot}$ and 1.3 M$_{\odot}$ in good agreement with the optical conclusions.
  • We obtained new optical observations of the X-ray source XMMU J083850.38-282756.8, the previously proposed counterpart of the gamma-ray source 3FGL J0838.8-2829. Time-series photometry in the $r'$ band reveals periodic modulation of $\approx1$ magnitude that is characteristic of the heating of the photosphere of a low-mass companion star by a compact object. The measured orbital period is 5.14817$\pm$0.00012 hr. The shape of the light curve is variable, evidently due to the effects of flaring and asymmetric heating. Spectroscopy reveals a companion of type M1 or later, having a radial velocity amplitude of 315$\pm$17 km/s, with period and phasing consistent with the heating interpretation. The mass function of the compact object is 0.69$\pm$0.11 $M_{\odot}$, which allows a neutron star in a high-inclination orbit. Variable, broad H$\alpha$ emission is seen, which is probably associated with a wind from the companion. These properties, as well as the X-ray and gamma-ray luminosities at the inferred distance of <1.7 kpc, are consistent with a redback millisecond pulsar in its non-accreting state. A search for radio pulsations is needed to confirm this interpretation and derive complete system parameters for modeling, although absorption by the ionized wind could hinder such detection.
  • We analyze the optical counterpart to the ultra-compact high velocity cloud AGC 226067, utilizing imaging taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The color magnitude diagram of the main body of AGC 226067 reveals an exclusively young stellar population, with an age of $\sim$7--50 Myr, and is consistent with a metallicity of [Fe/H]$\sim$$-$0.3 as previous work has measured via HII region spectroscopy. Additionally, the color magnitude diagram is consistent with a distance of $D$$\approx$17 Mpc, suggesting an association with the Virgo cluster. A secondary stellar system located $\sim$1.6' ($\sim$8 kpc) away in projection has a similar stellar population. The lack of an old red giant branch ($\gtrsim$5 Gyr) is contrasted with a serendipitously discovered Virgo dwarf in the ACS field of view (Dw J122147+132853), and the total diffuse light from AGC~226067 is consistent with the luminosity function of the resolved $\sim$7--50 Myr stellar population. The main body of AGC~226067 has a $M_{V}$=$-$11.3$\pm$0.3, or $M_{stars}$=5.4$\pm$1.3$\times$10$^4$ $M_{\odot}$ given the stellar population. We searched 20 deg$^2$ of imaging data adjacent to AGC~226067 in the Virgo Cluster, and found two similar stellar systems dominated by a blue stellar population, far from any massive galaxy counterpart -- if this population has similar star formation properties as AGC~226067, it implies $\sim$0.1 $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ in Virgo intracluster star formation. Given its unusual stellar population, AGC~226067 is likely a stripped remnant and is plausibly the result of compressed gas from the ram pressure stripped M86 subgroup ($\sim$350 kpc away in projection) as it falls into the Virgo Cluster.
  • This catalog summarizes information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) and all other bright ($m_{peak}\leq17$), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered in 2016. We then gather the near-IR through UV magnitudes of all host galaxies and the offsets of the supernovae from the centers of their hosts from public databases. We illustrate the results using a sample that now totals 668 supernovae discovered since 2014 May 1, including the supernovae from our previous catalogs, with type distributions closely matching those of the ideal magnitude limited sample from Li et al. (2011). This is the third of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts from the ASAS-SN team.
  • We present the ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopic evolution of a tidal disruption event (TDE) for the first time. After the discovery of the nearby TDE iPTF16fnl, we obtained a series of observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The dominant emission features closely resemble those seen in the UV spectra of the TDE ASASSN-14li and are also similar to those of N-rich quasars. However, there is significant evolution in the shape and central wavelength of the line profiles over the course of our observations, such that at early times the lines are broad and redshifted, while at later times the lines are significantly narrower and peak near the wavelengths of their corresponding atomic transitions. Like ASASSN-14li, but unlike N-rich quasars, iPTF16fnl shows neither MgII$\lambda 2798$\AA\ nor CIII]$\lambda 1909$\AA\ emission features. We also present optical photometry and spectroscopy, which suggest that the complex HeII profiles observed in the optical spectra of many TDEs are in part due to the presence of NIII and CIII Wolf-Rayet features, which can potentially serve as probes of the far-UV when space-based observations are not possible. Finally, we use Swift XRT and UVOT observations to place strong limits on the X-ray emission and determine the characteristic temperature, radius, and luminosity of the emitting material. We find that iPTF16fnl is subluminous and evolves more rapidly than other optically discovered TDEs.
  • Blazars, one of the most extreme class of active galaxies, constitute so far the largest known population of $\gamma$-ray sources and their number is continuously growing in the Fermi catalogs. However in the latest release of the Fermi catalog there is still a large fraction of sources that are classified as blazar candidate of uncertain type (BCUs) for which optical spectroscopic observations are necessary to confirm their nature and their associations. In addition about 1/3 of the $\gamma$-ray point sources listed in the Third Fermi-LAT Source Catalog (3FGL) are still unassociated and lacking an assigned lower energy counterpart. Since 2012 we have been carrying out an optical spectroscopic campaign to observe blazar candidates to confirm their nature. In this paper, the sixth of the series, we present optical spectroscopic observations for 30 $\gamma$-ray blazar candidates from different observing programs we carried out with the TNG, WHT, OAN, SOAR and Magellan telescopes. We found that 21 out of 30 sources investigated are BL Lac objects while the remaining targets are classified as flat spectrum radio quasars showing the typical broad emission lines of normal quasi stellar objects. We conclude that our selection of $\gamma$-ray blazars candidates based on their multifrequency properties continues to be a successful way to discover potential low-energy counterparts of the FermiUnidentified Gamma-ray Sources (UGSs) and to confirm the nature of BCUs.
  • Gamma-ray binaries consist of a neutron star or a black hole interacting with a normal star to produce gamma-ray emission that dominates the radiative output of the system. Only a handful of such systems have been previously discovered, all within our Galaxy. Here we report the discovery with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) of a luminous gamma-ray binary in the Large Magellanic Cloud from a search for periodic modulation in all sources in the third Fermi LAT catalog. This is the first such system to be found outside the Milky Way. The system has an orbital period of 10.3 days and is associated with a massive O5III star located in the supernova remnant DEM L241, previously identified as the candidate high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) CXOU J053600.0-673507. X-ray and radio emission are also modulated on the 10.3 day period, but are in anti-phase with the gamma-ray modulation. Optical radial velocity measurements suggest that the system contains a neutron star. The source is significantly more luminous than similar sources in the Milky Way at radio, optical, X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. The detection of this extra-galactic system, but no new Galactic systems raises the possibility that the predicted number of gamma-ray binaries in our Galaxy has been overestimated, and that HMXBs may be born containing relatively slowly rotating neutron stars.
  • We present the results of VLA, ATCA, and Swift XRT observations of the 2015 outburst of the transient neutron star X-ray binary (NSXB), EXO 1745$-$248, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. Combining (near-) simultaneous radio and X-ray measurements we measure a correlation between the radio and X-ray luminosities of $L_R\propto L_X^\beta$ with $\beta=1.68^{+0.10}_{-0.09}$, linking the accretion flow (probed by X-ray luminosity) and the compact jet (probed by radio luminosity). While such a relationship has been studied in multiple black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs), this work marks only the third NSXB with such a measurement. Constraints on this relationship in NSXBs are strongly needed, as comparing this correlation between different classes of XB systems is key in understanding the properties that affect the jet production process in accreting objects. Our best fit disc-jet coupling index for EXO 1745$-$248 is consistent with the measured correlation in NSXB 4U 1728$-$34 ($\beta=1.5\pm 0.2$) but inconsistent with the correlation we fit using the most recent measurements from the literature of NSXB Aql X-1 ($\beta=0.76^{+0.14}_{-0.15}$). While a similar disc-jet coupling index appears to hold across multiple BHXBs in the hard accretion state, this does not appear to be the case with the three NSXBs measured so far. Additionally, the normalization of the EXO 1745$-$248 correlation is lower than the other two NSXBs, making it one of the most radio faint XBs ever detected in the hard state. We also report the detection of a type-I X-ray burst during this outburst, where the decay timescale is consistent with hydrogen burning.
  • The image subtraction technique applied to study variable stars in globular clusters represented a leap in the number of new detections, with the drawback that many of these new light curves could not be transformed to magnitudes due to the severe crowding. In this paper we present observations of four Galactic globular clusters, M 2 (NGC 7089), M 10 (NGC 6254), M 80 (NGC 6093) and NGC 1261, taken with the ground-layer adaptive optics module at the SOAR Telescope, SAM. We show that the higher image quality provided by SAM allows the calibration of the light curves of the great majority of the variables near the cores of these clusters as well as the detection of new variables even in clusters where image-subtraction searches were already conducted. We report the discovery of 15 new variables in M 2 (12 RR Lyrae stars and 3 SX Phe stars), 12 new variables in M 10 (11 SX Phe and one long-period variable) and one new W UMa-type variable in NGC 1261. No new detections are found in M 80, but previous uncertain detections are confirmed and the corresponding light curves are calibrated into magnitudes. Additionally, based on the number of detected variables and new HST/UVIS photometry, we revisit a previous suggestion that M 80 may be the globular cluster with the richest population of blue stragglers in our Galaxy.
  • We report the detection of an infrared selected transient which has lasted at least 5 years, first identified by a large mid-infrared and optical outburst from a faint X-ray source detected with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In this paper we rule out several scenarios for the cause of this outburst, including a classical nova, a luminous red nova, AGN flaring, a stellar merger, and intermediate luminosity optical transients, and interpret this transient as the result of a Young Stellar Object (YSO) of at least solar mass accreting material from the remains of the dusty envelope from which it formed, in isolation from either a dense complex of cold gas or massive star formation. This object does not fit neatly into other existing categories of large outbursts of YSOs (FU Orionis types) which may be a result of the object's mass, age, and environment. It is also possible that this object is a new type of transient unrelated to YSOs.
  • The observed relation between the X-ray and radio properties of low-luminosity accreting black holes has enabled the identification of multiple candidate black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) in globular clusters. Here we report an identification of the radio source VLA J213002.08+120904 (aka M15 S2), recently reported in Kirsten et al. 2014, as a BHXB candidate. They showed that the parallax of this flat-spectrum variable radio source indicates a 2.2$^{+0.5}_{-0.3}$ kpc distance, which identifies it as lying in the foreground of the globular cluster M15. We determine the radio characteristics of this source, and place a deep limit on the X-ray luminosity of $\sim4\times10^{29}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Furthermore, we astrometrically identify a faint red stellar counterpart in archival Hubble images, with colors consistent with a foreground star; at 2.2 kpc its inferred mass is 0.1-0.2 $M_{\odot}$. We rule out that this object is a pulsar, neutron star X-ray binary, cataclysmic variable, or planetary nebula, concluding that VLA J213002.08+120904 is the first accreting black hole X-ray binary candidate discovered in quiescence outside a globular cluster. Given the relatively small area over which parallax studies of radio sources have been performed, this discovery suggests a much larger population of quiescent BHXBs in our Galaxy, $2.6\times10^4-1.7\times10^8$ BHXBs at $3\sigma$ confidence, than has been previously estimated ($\sim10^2-10^4$) through population synthesis.
  • We report the discovery of Antlia B, a faint dwarf galaxy at a projected distance of $\sim$72 kpc from NGC 3109 ($M_{V}$$\sim$$-$15 mag), the primary galaxy of the NGC 3109 dwarf association at the edge of the Local Group. The tip of the red giant branch distance to Antlia B is $D$=1.29$\pm$0.10 Mpc, which is consistent with the distance to NGC 3109. A qualitative analysis indicates the new dwarf's stellar population has both an old, metal poor red giant branch ($\gtrsim$10 Gyr, [Fe/H]$\sim$$-$2), and a younger blue population with an age of $\sim$200-400 Myr, analogous to the original Antlia dwarf, another likely satellite of NGC 3109. Antlia B has \ion{H}{1} gas at a velocity of $v_{helio,HI}$=376 km s$^{-1}$, confirming the association with NGC 3109 ($v_{helio}$=403 km s$^{-1}$). The HI gas mass (M$_{HI}$=2.8$\pm$0.2$\times$10$^{5}$ M$_{\odot}$), stellar luminosity ($M_{V}$=$-$9.7$\pm$0.6 mag) and half light radius ($r_{h}$=273$\pm$29 pc) are all consistent with the properties of dwarf irregular and dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Volume, and is most similar to the Leo P dwarf galaxy. The discovery of Antlia B is the initial result from a Dark Energy Camera survey for halo substructure and faint dwarf companions to NGC 3109 with the goal of comparing observed substructure with expectations from the $\Lambda$+Cold Dark Matter model in the sub-Milky Way regime.
  • We report five Local Volume dwarf galaxies (two of which are presented here for the first time) uncovered during a comprehensive archival search for optical counterparts to ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs). The UCHVC population of HI clouds are thought to be candidate gas-rich, low mass halos at the edge of the Local Group and beyond, but no comprehensive search for stellar counterparts to these systems has been presented. Careful visual inspection of all publicly available optical and ultraviolet imaging at the position of the UCHVCs revealed six blue, diffuse counterparts with a morphology consistent with a faint dwarf galaxy beyond the Local Group. Optical spectroscopy of all six candidate dwarf counterparts show that five have an H$\alpha$-derived velocity consistent with the coincident HI cloud, confirming their association, the sixth diffuse counterpart is likely a background object. The size and luminosity of the UCHVC dwarfs is consistent with other known Local Volume dwarf irregular galaxies. The gas fraction ($M_{HI}/M_{star}$) of the five dwarfs are generally consistent with that of dwarf irregular galaxies in the Local Volume, although ALFALFA-Dw1 (associated with ALFALFA UCHVC HVC274.68+74.70$-$123) has a very high $M_{HI}/M_{star}$$\sim$40. Despite the heterogenous nature of our search, we demonstrate that the current dwarf companions to UCHVCs are at the edge of detectability due to their low surface brightness, and that deeper searches are likely to find more stellar systems. If more sensitive searches do not reveal further stellar counterparts to UCHVCs, then the dearth of such systems around the Local Group may be in conflict with $\Lambda$CDM simulations.
  • Stellar multiplicity lies at the heart of many problems in modern astrophysics, including the physics of star formation, the observational properties of unresolved stellar populations, and the rates of interacting binaries such as cataclysmic variables, X-ray binaries, and Type Ia supernovae. However, little is known about the stellar multiplicity of field stars in the Milky Way, in particular about the differences in the multiplicity characteristics between metal-rich disk stars and metal-poor halo stars. In this study we perform a statistical analysis of ~14,000 F-type dwarf stars in the Milky Way through time-resolved spectroscopy with the sub-exposures archived in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We obtain absolute radial velocity measurements through template cross-correlation of individual sub-exposures with temporal baselines varying from minutes to years. These sparsely sampled radial velocity curves are analyzed using Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques to constrain the very short-period binary fraction for field F-type stars in the Milky Way. Metal-rich disk stars were found to be 30% more likely to have companions with periods shorter than 12 days than metal-poor halo stars.
  • We report the results of our exploratory program carried out with the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope aimed at associating counterparts and establishing the nature of the Fermi Unidentified gamma-ray Sources (UGS). We selected the optical counterparts of 6 UGSs from the Fermi catalog on the basis of our recently discovered tight connection between infrared and gamma-ray emission found for the gamma-ray blazars detected by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) in its the all-sky survey. We perform for the first time a spectroscopic study of the low-energy counterparts of Fermi UGS, in the optical band, confirming the blazar-like nature for the whole sample. We also present new spectroscopic observations of 6 Active Galaxies of Uncertain type associated with Fermi sources (AGUs) that appear to be BL Lac objects. Finally, we report the spectra collected for 6 known gamma-ray blazars belonging to the Roma BZCAT that were obtained to establish their nature or better estimate their redshifts. Two interesting cases of high redshift and extremely luminous BL Lac objects (z>1.18 and z>1.02, based on the detection of Mg II intervening systems) are also discussed.
  • The universal link between the processes of accretion and ejection leads to the formation of jets and outflows around accreting compact objects. Incoherent synchrotron emission from these outflows can be observed from a wide range of accreting binaries, including black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarfs. Monitoring the evolution of the radio emission during their sporadic outbursts provides important insights into the launching of jets, and, when coupled with the behaviour of the source at shorter wavelengths, probes the underlying connection with the accretion process. Radio observations can also probe the impact of jets/outflows (including other explosive events such as magnetar giant flares) on the ambient medium, quantifying their kinetic feedback. The high sensitivity of the SKA will open up new parameter space, enabling the monitoring of accreting stellar-mass compact objects from their bright, Eddington-limited outburst states down to the lowest-luminosity quiescent levels, whose intrinsic faintness has to date precluded detailed studies. A census of quiescently accreting black holes will also constrain binary evolution processes. By enabling us to extend our existing investigations of black hole jets to the fainter jets from neutron star and white dwarf systems, the SKA will permit comparative studies to determine the role of the compact object in jet formation. The high sensitivity, wide field of view and multi-beaming capability of the SKA will enable the detection and monitoring of all bright flaring transients in the observable local Universe, including the ULXs, ... [Abridged] This chapter reviews the science goals outlined above, demonstrating the progress that will be made by the SKA. We also discuss the potential of the astrometric and imaging observations that would be possible should a significant VLBI component be included in the SKA.
  • We report the discovery of a new faint dwarf galaxy, which we dub Scl-MM-Dw1, at a projected distance of $\sim$65 kpc from the spiral galaxy NGC 253. The discovery results from the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS), a program with the Magellan/Megacam imager to study faint substructure in resolved stellar light around massive galaxies outside of the Local Group. We measure a tip of the red giant branch distance to Scl-MM-Dw1 of $D$=3.9$\pm$0.5 Mpc, consistent with that of NGC 253, making their association likely. The new dwarf's stellar population is complex, with an old, metal poor red giant branch ($\gtrsim$10 Gyr, [Fe/H]$\sim$$-$2), and an asymptotic giant branch with an age of $\sim$500 Myr. Scl-MM-Dw1 has a half-light radius of $r_{h}$=340$\pm$50 pc and an absolute magnitude of $M_{V}$=$-$10.3$\pm$0.6 mag, comparable to the Milky Way's satellites at the same luminosity. Once complete, our imaging survey of NGC 253 and other nearby massive galaxies will provide a census of faint substructure in halos beyond the Local Group, both to put our own environment into context and to confront models of hierarchical structure formation.
  • Time-domain spectroscopy of the classical accreting T Tauri star, TW Hya, covering a decade and spanning the far UV to the near-infrared spectral regions can identify the radiation sources, the atmospheric structure produced by accretion,and properties of the stellar wind. On time scales from days to years, substantial changes occur in emission line profiles and line strengths. Our extensive time-domain spectroscopy suggests that the broad near-IR, optical, and far-uv emission lines, centered on the star, originate in a turbulent post-shock region and can undergo scattering by the overlying stellar wind as well as some absorption from infalling material. Stable absorption features appear in H-alpha, apparently caused by an accreting column silhouetted in the stellar wind. Inflow of material onto the star is revealed by the near-IR He I 10830A line, and its free-fall velocity correlates inversely with the strength of the post-shock emission, consistent with a dipole accretion model. However, the predictions of hydrogen line profiles based on accretion stream models are not well-matched by these observations. Evidence of an accelerating warm to hot stellar wind is shown by the near-IR He I line, and emission profiles of C II, C III, C IV, N V, and O VI. The outflow of material changes substantially in both speed and opacity in the yearly sampling of the near-IR He I line over a decade. Terminal outflow velocities that range from 200 km/s to almost 400 km/s in He I appear to be directly related to the amount of post- shock emission, giving evidence for an accretion-driven stellar wind. Calculations of the emission from realistic post- shock regions are needed.
  • The chemo-dynamics of galaxy halos beyond the Local Group may now be mapped out through the use of globular clusters and planetary nebulae as bright tracer objects, along with deep multi-slit spectroscopy of the integrated stellar light. We present results from surveying nearby early-type galaxies, including evidence for kinematically distinct halos that may reflect two-phase galaxy assembly. We also demonstrate the utility of the tracer approach in measuring the kinematics of stellar substructures around the Umbrella Galaxy, which allow us to reconstruct the progenitor properties and stream orbit.