• We present the results of a long-term observation campaign of the extragalactic wind-accreting black-hole X-ray binary LMC X-1, using the Proportional Counter Array on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The observations show that LMC X-1's accretion disk exhibits an anomalous temperature-luminosity relation. We use deep archival RXTE observations to show that large movements across the temperature-luminosity space occupied by the system can take place on time scales as short as half an hour. These changes cannot be adequately explained by perturbations that propagate from the outer disk on a viscous timescale. We propose instead that the apparent disk variations reflect rapid fluctuations within the Compton up-scattering coronal material, which occults the inner parts of the disk. The expected relationship between the observed disk luminosity and apparent disk temperature derived from the variable occultation model is quantitatively shown to be in good agreement with the observations. Two other observations support this picture: an inverse correlation between the flux in the power-law spectral component and the fitted inner disk temperature, and a near-constant total photon flux, suggesting that the inner disk is not ejected when a lower temperature is observed.
  • We report the discovery of the second accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP) in the globular cluster NGC 6440. Pulsations with a frequency of 205.89 Hz were detected with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer on August 30th, October 1st and October 28th, 2009, during the decays of ~4 day outbursts of a newly X-ray transient source in NGC 6440. By studying the Doppler shift of the pulsation frequency, we find that the system is an ultra-compact binary with an orbital period of 57.3 minutes and a projected semi-major axis of 6.22 light-milliseconds. Based on the mass function, we estimate a lower limit to the mass of the companion to be 0.0067 M_sun (assuming a 1.4 M_sun neutron star). This new pulsar shows the shortest outburst recurrence time among AMXPs (~1 month). If this behavior does not cease, this AMXP has the potential to be one of the best sources in which to study how the binary system and the neutron star spin evolve. Furthermore, the characteristics of this new source indicate that there might exist a population of AMXPs undergoing weak outbursts which are undetected by current all-sky X-ray monitors. NGC 6440 is the only globular cluster to host two known AMXPs, while no AMXPs have been detected in any other globular cluster.
  • We present a detailed study of the X-ray energy and power spectral properties of the neutron star transient IGR J17191-2821. We discovered four instances of pairs of simultaneous kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs). The frequency difference between these kHz QPOs is between 315 Hz and 362 Hz. We also report on the detection of five thermonuclear type-I X-ray bursts and the discovery of burst oscillations at ~294 Hz during three of them. Finally, we report on a faint and short outburst precursor, which occurred about two months before the main outburst. Our results on the broadband spectral and variability properties allow us to firmly establish the atoll source nature of IGR J17191-2821.
  • We have studied the rapid X-ray time variability in 99 pointed observations with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE)'s Proportional Counter Array of the low-mass X-ray binary 1E~1724--3045 which includes, for the first time, observations of this source in its island and banana states, confirming the atoll nature of this source. We report the discovery of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs). Although we have 5 detections of the lower kHz QPO and one detection of the upper kHz QPO, in none of the observations we detect both QPOs simultaneously. By comparing the dependence of the rms amplitude with energy of kHz QPOs in different atoll sources, we conclude that this information cannot be use to unambiguously identify the kilohertz QPOs as was previously thought. We find that Terzan~2 in its different states shows timing behavior similar to that seen in other neutron-star low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). We studied the flux transitions observed between February 2004 and October 2005 and conclude that they are due to changes in the accretion rate.
  • The black-hole X-ray binary transient GRO J1655-40 underwent an outburst beginning in early 2005. We present the results of our multi-wavelength observational campaign to study the early outburst spectral and temporal evolution, which combines data from X-ray (RXTE, INTEGRAL), radio (VLA) and optical (ROTSE, SMARTS) instruments. During the reported period the source left quiescence and went through four major accreting black hole states: low-hard, hard intermediate, soft intermediate and high-soft. We investigated dipping behavior in the RXTE band and compare our results to the 1996-1997 case, when the source was predominantly in the high-soft state, finding significant differences. We consider the evolution of the low frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and find that the frequency strongly correlates with the spectral characteristics, before shutting off prior to the transition to the high-soft state. We model the broad-band high-energy spectrum in the context of empirical models, as well as more physically motivated thermal and bulk-motion Comptonization and Compton reflection models. RXTE and INTEGRAL data together support a statistically significant high energy cut-off in the energy spectrum at 100~200 keV during the low-hard state. The RXTE data alone also show it very significantly during the transition, but cannot see one in the high-soft state spectra. We consider radio, optical and X-ray connections in the context of possible synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton origins of X-ray emission in low-hard and intermediate states. In this outburst of GRO J1655-40, the radio flux does not rise strongly with the X-ray flux.
  • In this Paper we report on our analysis of three Chandra observations of the accretion-powered millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J00291+5934 obtained during the late stages of the 2004 outburst. We also report the serendipitous detection of the source in quiescence by ROSAT during MJD 48830-48839. The detected 0.3-10 keV source count rates varied significantly between the Chandra observations from (7.2+-1.2)x10^-3, (6.8+-0.9)x10^-3, and (1.4+-0.1)x10^-2 counts per second for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Chandra observation, on MJD 53371.88, 53383.99, and 53407.57, respectively. The count rate for the 3rd observation is 2.0+-0.4 times as high as that of the average of the first two observations. The unabsorbed 0.5-10 keV source flux for the best-fit power-law model to the source spectrum was (7.9+-2.5)x10^-14, (7.3+-2.0)x10^-14, and (1.17+-0.22)x10^-13 erg cm^-2 s^-1 for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Chandra observation, respectively. We find that this source flux is consistent with that found by ROSAT [~(5.4+-2.4)x10^-14 erg cm^-2 s^-1]. Under the assumption that the interstellar extinction, N_H, does not vary between the observations, we find that the blackbody temperature during the 2nd Chandra observation is significantly higher than that during the 1st and 3rd observation. Furthermore, the effective temperature of the neutron star derived from fitting an absorbed blackbody or neutron star atmosphere model to the data is rather high in comparison with many other neutron star soft X-ray transients in quiescence, even during the 1st and 3rd observation. If we assume that the source quiescent luminosity is similar to that measured for two other accretion powered millisecond pulsars in quiescence, the distance to IGR J00291+5934 is 2.6-3.6 kpc.
  • We report the discovery of a new X-ray pulsar, XTE J1810-197. The source was serendipitously discovered on 2003 July 15 by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) while observing the soft gamma repeater SGR 1806-20. The pulsar has a 5.54 s spin-period and a soft spectrum (photon index ~ 4). We detect the source in earlier RXTE observations back to 2003 January. These show that a transient outburst began between 2002 November 17 and 2003 January 23 and that the pulsar has been spinning down since then, with a high rate Pdot ~ 10^-11 s/s showing significant timing noise, but no evidence for Doppler shifts due to a binary companion. The rapid spin-down rate and slow spin-period imply a super-critical magnetic field B=3x10^14 G and a young characteristic age < 7600 yr. These properties are strikingly similar to those of anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters, making the source a likely new magnetar. A follow-up Chandra observation provided a 2".5 radius error circle within which the 1.5 m Russian-Turkish Optical Telescope RTT150 found a limiting magnitude of R_c=21.5, in accord with other recently reported limits. The source is present in archival ASCA and ROSAT data as well, at a level 100 times fainter than the \~ 3 mCrab seen in 2003. This suggests that other X-ray sources that are currently in a state similar to the inactive phase of XTE J1810-197 may also be unidentified magnetars awaiting detection via a similar activity.
  • We report the serendipitous detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer of a long and peculiar X-ray burst whose localization is consistent with one known X-ray burster (GRS 1747-312) and which occurred when that source was otherwise quiescent. The peculiar feature concerns a strong radius expansion of the neutron star photosphere, which occurred not within a few seconds from the start of the burst, as is standard in radius-expansion bursts, but 20 s later. This suggests that two different layers of the neutron star may have undergone thermonuclear runaways: a hydrogen-rich and a hydrogen-poor layer. The reason for the delay may be related to the source being otherwise quiescent.
  • The Soft Gamma Repeater, SGR 1900+14, entered a new phase of activity in April 2001 initiated by the intermediate flare recorded on April 18. Ten days following this flare, we discovered an abrupt increase in the source flux between consecutive RXTE orbits. This X-ray flux excess decayed over the next several minutes and was subsequently linked to a high fluence burst from SGR 1900+14 recorded by other spacecraft (Ulysses and KONUS) while the SGR was Earth-occulted for RXTE. We present here spectral and temporal analysis of both the burst of 28 April and the long X-ray tail following it. We find strong evidence of an exclusively thermal X-ray tail in this event and bring this evidence to bear on other bursts and flares from SGR 1900+14 which have shown extended X-ray excesses (e.g. 1998 August 29). We include in this comparison a discussion of the physical origins of SGR bursts and extended X-ray tails.
  • We present the results from a multiwavelength campaign of GRS 1915+105 performed from 2000 April 16 to 25. This is one of the largest coordinated set of observations ever performed for this source, covering the wide energy band in radio (13.3-0.3 cm), near-infrared (J-H-K), X-rays and Gamma-rays (from 1 keV to 10 MeV). During the campaign GRS 1915+105 was predominantly in the "plateau" (or low/hard) state but sometimes showed soft X-ray oscillations: before April 20.3, rapid, quasi-periodic (~= 45 min) flare-dip cycles were observed. The radio flares observed on April 17 shows frequency- dependent peak delay, consistent with an expansion of synchrotron-emitting region starting at the transition from the hard-dip to the soft-flare states in X-rays. On the other hand, infrared flares on April 20 appear to follow (or precede) the beginning of X-ray oscillations with an inconstant time delay of ~= 5-30 min. This implies that the infrared emitting region is located far from the black hole by >~ 10E13 cm, while its size is <~ 10E12 cm constrained from the time variability. We find a good correlation between the quasi-steady flux level in the near-infrared band and in the X-ray band. From this we estimate that the reprocessing of X-rays, probably occurring in the outer parts of the accretion disk, accounts for about 20-30% of the observed K magnitude in the plateau state. The OSSE spectrum in the 0.05-10 MeV band is represented by a single power law with a photon index of 3.1 extending to ~1 MeV with no cutoff. The power-law slope above ~30 keV is found to be very similar between different states in spite of large flux variations in soft X-rays, implying that the electron energy distribution is not affected by the change of the state in the accretion disk.
  • A search for pulsations from the Be X-ray binary SAX J2239.3+6116, through observations with the Narrow Field Instruments on BeppoSAX and the Proportional Counter Array on RXTE, yielded the clear presence of a 1247 s coherent oscillation. Given the fairly high X-ray luminosity on previous occasions (up to a few times 10^36 erg/s in 2 to 28 keV), the oscillation must be due to the spin of a neutron star. Assuming that the 262 day recurrence time is the orbital period, SAX J2239.3+6116 has both the longest orbital period and the longest pulse period of 24 Be X-ray binaries with measured orbital periods.
  • Starting in 1999, the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) has monitored the central bulge region of the Galaxy with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA), resolving about 50 binary X-ray sources, including 18 sources discovered by RXTE and BeppoSAX. The accretion rates that RXTE observed from these sources ranged from highs approaching Eddington limits to lows that may correspond to mass exchange for a binary period near the minimum of 80 minutes. Several neutron star binaries with low peak luminosity have outburst or cycle time-scales which are shorter than those of brighter and better known counterparts. We compare the characteristics of the binaries with low rates of mass exchange to predictions of their evolution.
  • Using X-ray data from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we carried out pulse timing analysis of the transient X-ray pulsar SAX J2103.5+4545. An outburst was detected by All Sky Monitor (ASM) October 25 1999 and reached a peak X-ray brightness of 27 mCrab October 28. Between November 19 and December 27, the RXTE/PCA carried out pointed observations which provided us with pulse arrival times. These yield an eccentric orbit (e= 0.4 \pm 0.2) with an orbital period of 12.68 \pm 0.25 days and light travel time across the projected semimajor axis of 72 \pm 6 sec. The pulse period was measured to be 358.62171 \pm 0.00088 s and the spin-up rate (2.50 \pm 0.15) \times 10^{-13} Hz s^{-1}. The ASM data for the February to September 1997 outburst in which BeppoSAX discovered SAX J2103.5+4545 (Hulleman, in't Zand and Heise 1998) are modulated at time scales close to the orbital period. Folded light curves of the 1997 ASM data and the 1999 PCA data are similar and show that the intensity increases at periastron passages.
  • We report on the evolution of the timing of 4U1630-47 during its 1998 outburst using data obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The count rate and position in hardness-intensity, color-color diagrams and simple spectral fits are used to track the concurrent spectral changes. The source showed seven distinct types of timing behavior, most of which show differences with the canonical black hole spectral/timing states. In marked contrast to previous outbursts, we find quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) signals during nearly all stages of the outburst with frequencies between 0.06Hz and 14Hz and a remarkable variety of other characteristics. In particular we find large (up to 23% rms) amplitude QPO on the early rise. Later, slow 0.1Hz semi- regular short (~ 5 sec), 9 to 16% deep dips dominate the light curve. At this time there are two QPOs, one stable near 13.5Hz and the other whose frequency drops from 6--8Hz to ~4.5 Hz during the dips. BeppoSAX observations during the very late declining phase show 4U1630-47 in a low state.
  • We report on long-term observations of the Galactic-bulge black hole candidates 1E 1740.7-2942 and GRS 1758-258 with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer. 1E 1740.7-2942 has been observed 77 times and GRS 1758-258 has been observed 82 times over the past 1000 days. The flux of each object has varied by no more than a factor of 2.5 during this period, and the indices of the energy spectra have varied by no more than 0.4. The power spectra are similar to other black-hole candidates: flat-topped noise, breaking to a power law. Each object has exhibited a brightening that lasted for several months, and we have a found a time lag between the photon power-law index and the count rate. In both sources, the spectrum is softest during the decline from the brightening. This behavior can be understood in the context of thin-disk and advection-dominated accretion flows coexisting over a wide range of radii, with the implication that both sources have low-mass companions and accrete via Roche-lobe overflow.
  • A new x-ray transient, designated XTE J1739-302, was discovered with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in data from 12 August 1997. Although it was the brightest source in the Galactic Center region while active (about 3.0 x 10^-9 ergs/cm2/s from 2 to 25 keV), it was only observed on that one day; it was not detectable nine days earlier or two days later. There is no known counterpart at other wavelengths, and its proximity to the Galactic Center will make such an identification difficult due to source confusion and extinction. The x-ray spectrum and intensity suggest a giant outburst of a Be/neutron star binary, although no pulsations were observed and the outburst was shorter than is usual from these systems.
  • We report simultaneous observations in the X-ray, infrared, and radio wavelengths of the galactic superluminal source GRS 1915+105. During episodes of rapid disappearance and follow up replenishment of the inner accretion disk evidenced by the X-ray oscillating flux, we observe the ejection of relativistic plasma clouds in the form of synchrotron flares at infrared and radio wavelengths. The expelled clouds contain very energetic particles with Lorentz factors of about 1000, or more. These ejections can be viewed as small-scale analogs of the more massive ejecta with relativistic bulk motions that have been previously observed in GRS 1915+105.