• Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) allow us to pinpoint and study star-forming galaxies in the early universe, thanks to their orders of magnitude brighter peak luminosities compared to other astrophysical sources, and their association with deaths of massive stars. We present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 detections of three Swift GRB host galaxies lying at redshifts $z = 5.913$ (GRB 130606A), $z = 6.295$ (GRB 050904), and $z = 6.327$ (GRB 140515A) in the F140W (wide-$JH$ band, $\lambda_{\rm{obs}}\sim1.4\,\mu m$) filter. The hosts have magnitudes (corrected for Galactic extinction) of $m_{\rm{\lambda_{obs},AB}}= 26.34^{+0.14}_{-0.16}, 27.56^{+0.18}_{-0.22},$ and $28.30^{+0.25}_{-0.33}$ respectively. In all three cases the probability of chance coincidence of lower redshift galaxies is $\lesssim2\,\%$, indicating that the detected galaxies are most likely the GRB hosts. These are the first detections of high redshift ($z > 5$) GRB host galaxies in emission. The galaxies have luminosities in the range $0.1-0.6\,L^{*}_{z=6}$ (with $M_{1600}^{*}=-20.95\pm0.12$), and half-light radii in the range $0.6-0.9\,\rm{kpc}$. Both their half-light radii and luminosities are consistent with existing samples of Lyman-break galaxies at $z\sim6$. Spectroscopic analysis of the GRB afterglows indicate low metallicities ($[\rm{M/H}]\lesssim-1$) and low dust extinction ($A_{\rm{V}}\lesssim0.1$) along the line of sight. Using stellar population synthesis models, we explore the implications of each galaxy's luminosity for its possible star formation history, and consider the potential for emission-line metallicity determination with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope.
  • OJ287 is a quasi-periodic quasar with roughly 12 year optical cycles. It displays prominent outbursts which are predictable in a binary black hole model. The model predicted a major optical outburst in December 2015. We found that the outburst did occur within the expected time range, peaking on 2015 December 5 at magnitude 12.9 in the optical R-band. Based on Swift/XRT satellite measurements and optical polarization data, we find that it included a major thermal component. Its timing provides an accurate estimate for the spin of the primary black hole, chi = 0.313 +- 0.01. The present outburst also confirms the established general relativistic properties of the system such as the loss of orbital energy to gravitational radiation at the 2 % accuracy level and it opens up the possibility of testing the black hole no-hair theorem with a 10 % accuracy during the present decade.
  • We present HI 21cm emission observations of the z ~ 0.00632 sub-damped Lyman-alpha absorber (sub-DLA) towards PG1216+069 made using the Arecibo Telescope and the Very Large Array (VLA). The Arecibo 21cm spectrum corresponds to an HI mass of ~ 3.2x10^7 solar masses, two orders of magnitude smaller than that of a typical spiral galaxy. This is surprising since in the local Universe the cross-section for absorption at high HI column densities is expected to be dominated by spirals. The 21cm emission detected in the VLA spectral cube has a low signal-to-noise ratio, and represents only half the total flux seen at Arecibo. Emission from three other sources is detected in the VLA observations, with only one of these sources having an optical counterpart. This group of HI sources appears to be part of complex "W", believed to lie in the background of the Virgo cluster. While several HI cloud complexes have been found in and around the Virgo cluster, it is unclear whether the ram pressure and galaxy harassment processes that are believed to be responsible for the creation of such clouds in a cluster environment are relevant at the location of this cloud complex. The extremely low metallicity of the gas, ~ 1/40 solar, also makes it unlikely that the sub-DLA consists of material that has been stripped from a galaxy. Thus, while our results have significantly improved our understanding of the host of this sub-DLA, the origin of the gas cloud remains a mystery
  • Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) the COS Science Team has conducted a high signal-to-noise survey of 14 bright QSOs. In a previous paper (Savage et al. 2014) these far-UV spectra were used to discover 14 "warm" ($T > 10^5$ K) absorbers using a combination of broad Ly\alpha\ and O VI absorptions. A reanalysis of a few of this new class of absorbers using slightly relaxed fitting criteria finds as many as 20 warm absorbers could be present in this sample. A shallow, wide spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey has been conducted around these sight lines to investigate the warm absorber environment, which is found to be spiral-rich galaxy groups or cluster outskirts with radial velocity dispersions of \sigma\ = 250-750 km/s. While 2\sigma\ evidence is presented favoring the hypothesis that these absorptions are associated with the galaxy groups and not with the individual, nearest galaxies, this evidence has considerable systematic uncertainties and is based on a small sample size so it is not entirely conclusive. If the associations are with galaxy groups, the observed frequency of warm absorbers (dN/dz = 3.5-5 per unit redshift) requires them to be very large (~1 Mpc in radius at high covering factor). Most likely these warm absorbers are interface gas clouds whose presence implies the existence of a hotter ($T \sim 10^{6.5}$ K), diffuse and probably very massive ($>10^{11}~M_{\odot}$) intra-group medium which has yet to be detected directly.
  • We report on the observed properties of the plasma revealed through high signal-to-noise (S/N) observations of 54 intervening O VI absorption systems containing 85 O VI and 133 H I components in a blind survey of 14 QSOs observed at ~18 km s-1 resolution with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) over a redshift path of 3.52 at z < 0.5. Simple systems with one or two H I components and one O VI component comprise 50% of the systems. For a sample of 45 well-aligned absorption components where the temperature can be estimated, we find evidence for cool photoionized gas in 31 (69%) and warm gas (6 > log T > 5) in 14 (31%) of the components. The total hydrogen content of the 14 warm components can be estimated from the temperature and the measured value of log N(H I). The very large implied values of log N(H) range from 18.38 to 20.38 with a median of 19.35. The metallicity, [O/H], in the 6 warm components with log T > 5.45 ranges from -1.93 to 0.03 with a median value of -1.0 dex. Ground-based galaxy redshift studies reveal that most of the absorbers we detect sample gas in the IGM extending 200 to 600 kpc beyond the closest associated galaxy. We estimate the warm aligned O VI absorbers contain (4.1+/-1.1)% of the baryons at low z. The warm plasma traced by the aligned O VI and H I absorption contains nearly as many baryons as are found in galaxies.
  • In order to find more examples of the elusive high-redshift molecular absorbers, we have embarked on a systematic discovery program for highly obscured, radio-loud "invisible AGN" using the VLA Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimeters (FIRST) radio survey in conjunction with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to identify 82 strong (> 300 mJy) radio sources positionally coincident with late-type, presumably gas-rich galaxies. In this first paper, the basic properties of this sample are described including the selection process and the analysis of the spectral-energydistributions (SEDs) derived from the optical (SDSS) + near-IR (NIR) photometry obtained by us at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m. The NIR images confirm the late-type galaxy morphologies found by SDSS for these sources in all but a few (6 of 70) cases (12 previously well-studied or misclassified sources were culled). Among 70 sources in the final sample, 33 show galaxy type SEDs, 17 have galaxy components to their SEDs, and 20 have quasar power-law continua. At least 9 sources with galaxy SEDs have K-band flux densities too faint to be giant ellipticals if placed at their photometric redshifts. Photometric redshifts for this sample are analyzed and found to be too inaccurate for an efficient radio-frequency absorption line search; spectroscopic redshifts are required. A few new spectroscopic redshifts for these sources are presented here but more will be needed to make significant progress in this field. Subsequent papers will describe the radio continuum properties of the sample and the search for redshifted H I 21 cm absorption.
  • We present HST/WFPC2 broadband and ground-based Halpha images, H I 21-cm emission maps, and low-resolution optical spectra of the nearby galaxy ESO 1327-2041, which is located 38 arcsec (14 kpc in projection) west of the quasar PKS 1327-206. Our HST images reveal that ESO 1327-2041 has a complex optical morphology, including an extended spiral arm that was previously classified as a polar ring. Our optical spectra show Halpha emission from several H II regions in this arm located ~5 arcsec from the quasar position (~2 kpc in projection) and our ground-based Halpha images reveal the presence of several additional H II regions in an inclined disk near the galaxy's center. Absorption associated with ESO 1327-2041 is found in H I 21-cm, optical, and near-UV spectra of PKS 1327-206. We find two absorption components at cz = 5255 and 5510 km/s in the H I 21-cm absorption spectrum, which match the velocities of previously discovered metal-line components. We attribute the 5510 km/s absorber to disk gas in the extended spiral arm and the 5255 km/s absorber to high-velocity gas that has been tidally stripped from the disk of ESO 1327-2041. The complexity of the galaxy/absorber relationships for these very nearby H I 21-cm absorbers suggests that the standard view of high redshift damped Lyman-alpha absorbers is oversimplified in many cases.
  • High signal-to-noise (S/N) observations of the QSO PKS 0405-123 (zem = 0.572) with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph from 1134 to 1796 A with a resolution of 17 km s-1 are used to study the multi-phase partial Lyman limit system (LLS) at z = 0.16716 which has previously been studied using relatively low S/N spectra from STIS and FUSE. The LLS and an associated H I-free broad O VI absorber likely originate in the circumgalactic gas associated with a pair of galaxies at z = 0.1688 and 0.1670 with impact parameters of 116 h70-1 and 99 h70-1. The broad and symmetric O VI absorption is detected in the z = 0.16716 restframe with v = -278 +/- 3 km s-1, log N(O VI) = 13.90 +/- 0.03 and b = 52 +/- 2 km s-1. This absorber is not detected in H I or other species with the possible exception of N V . The broad, symmetric O VI profile and absence of corresponding H I absorption indicates that the circumgalactic gas in which the collisionally ionized O VI arises is hot (log T ~ 5.8-6.2). The absorber may represent a rare but important new class of low z IGM absorbers. The LLS has strong asymmetrical O VI absorption with log N(O VI) = 14.72 +/- 0.02 spanning a velocity range from -200 to +100 km s-1. The high and low ions in the LLS have properties resembling those found for Galactic highly ionized HVCs where the O VI is likely produced in the conductive and turbulent interfaces between cool and hot gas.
  • The circumgalactic medium (CGM) around galaxies is believed to record various forms of galaxy feedback and contain a significant portion of the "missing baryons" of individual dark matter halos. However, clear observational evidence for the existence of the hot CGM is still absent. We use intervening galaxies along 12 background AGNs as tracers to search for X-ray absorption lines produced in the corresponding CGM. Stacking Chandra grating observations with respect to galaxy groups and different luminosities of these intervening galaxies, we obtain spectra with signal-to-noise ratios of 46-72 per 20-mA spectral bin at the expected OVII Kalpha line. We find no detectable absorption lines of CVI, NVII, OVII, OVIII, or NeIX. The high spectral quality allows us to tightly constrain upper limits to the corresponding ionic column densities (in particular log[N(OVII)(cm^{-2})]<=14.2--14.8). These nondetections are inconsistent with the Local Group hypothesis of the X-ray absorption lines at z~0 commonly observed in the spectra of AGNs. These results indicate that the putative CGM in the temperature range of 10^{5.5}-10^{6.3} K may not be able to account for the missing baryons unless the metallicity is less than 10% solar.
  • We report the discovery of a dwarf (M_B = -13.9) post-starburst galaxy coincident in recession velocity (within uncertainties) with the highest column density absorber (N_HI = 10^15.85 cm^{-2} at cz = 1586 km/s) in the 3C~273 sightline. This galaxy is by far the closest galaxy to this absorber, projected just 71 kpc on the sky from the sightline. The mean properties of the stellar populations in this galaxy are consistent with a massive starburst ~3.5 Gyrs ago, whose attendant supernovae, we argue, could have driven sufficient gas from this galaxy to explain the nearby absorber. Beyond the proximity on the sky and in recession velocity, the further evidence in favor of this conclusion includes both a match in the metallicities of absorber and galaxy, and the fact that the absorber has an overabundance of Si/C, suggesting recent type II supernova enrichment. Thus, this galaxy and its ejecta are the expected intermediate stage in the fading dwarf evolutionary sequence envisioned by Babul & Rees to explain the abundance of faint blue galaxies at intermediate redshifts.
  • We use the Karachentseva (1973) ``Catalogue of Very Isolated Galaxies'' to investigate a candidate list of >100 very isolated early-type galaxies. Broad-band imaging and low resolution spectroscopy are available for a large fraction of these candidates and result in a sample of 102 very isolated early-type galaxies, including 65 ellipticals and 37 S0 galaxies. Many of these systems are quite luminous and the resulting optical luminosity functions of the Es and early-types (E+S0s) show no statistical differences when compared to luminosity functions dominated by group and cluster galaxies. However, whereas S0s outnumber Es 4:1 in the CfA survey, isolated Es outnumber S0s by nearly 2:1. We conclude that very isolated elliptical galaxies show no evidence for a different formation and/or evolution process compared to Es formed in groups or clusters, but that most S0s are formed by a mechanism (e.g., gas stripping) that occurs only in groups and rich clusters. Our luminosity function results for ellipticals are consistent with very isolated ellipticals being formed by merger events, in which no companions remain. CHANDRA observations were proposed to test specifically the merger hypothesis for isolated ellipticals. However, this program has resulted in the observation of only one isolated early-type galaxy, the S0 KIG 284, which was not detected at a limit well below that expected for a remnant group of galaxies. Therefore, the hypothesis remains untested that very isolated elliptical galaxies are the remains of a compact group of galaxies which completely merged.
  • The 3C 273 and RX J1230.8+0115 sightlines probe the outskirts of the Virgo Cluster at physical separations between the sightlines of 200-500 h_70 kpc. We present an analysis of HST STIS echelle and FUSE UV spectroscopy of RX J1230.8+0115 in which we detect five Lyman-alpha absorbers at Virgo distances. One of these absorbers is a blend of two strong metal line absorbers coincident in velocity with the highest neutral hydrogen column density absorber in the 3C 273 sightline ~350 h_70 kpc away. The consistency of the metal line column density ratios in the RX J1230.8+0115 sightline allows us to determine the ionization mechanism (photoionization) for these absorbers. While the low signal-to-noise ratio of the FUSE spectrum limits our ability to model the neutral hydrogen column density of these absorbers, we are able to constrain them to be in the range 10^{16-17} cm^-2. The properties of these absorbers are similar to those of the 3C 273 absorber studied by Tripp et al. However, the inferred line-of-sight size for the 3C 273 absorber is only 70 pc, much smaller than those inferred in RX J1230.8+0115, which are 10-30 h_70 kpc. The small sizes of all three absorbers are at odds with the >~350 h_70 kpc minimum transverse size implied by an application of the standard QSO line pairs analysis. On the basis of absorber associations between these two sight lines we conclude that a large-scale structure filament produces a correlated, not contiguous, gaseous structure in this region of the Virgo Supercluster. These data may indicate that we are detecting overdensities in the large scale structure filaments in this region. Alternatively, the presence of a galaxy 71 h_70 kpc from a 3C 273 absorber may indicate that we have probed outflowing, starburst driven shells of gas associated with nearby galaxies.
  • We present VLA and first-epoch VLBA observations that are part of a program to study the parsec-scale radio structure of a sample of fifteen high-energy-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs). The sample was chosen to span the range of logarithmic X-ray to radio flux ratios observed in HBLs. As this is only the first epoch of observations, proper motions of jet components are not yet available; thus we consider only the structure and alignment of the parsec- and kiloparsec-scale jets. Like most low-energy-peaked BL Lacs (LBLs), our HBL sample shows parsec-scale, core-jet morphologies and compact, complex kiloparsec-scale morphologies. Some objects also show evidence for bending of the jet 10-20pc from the core, suggesting interaction of the jet with the surrounding medium. Whereas LBLs show a wide distribution of parsec- to kpc-scale jet misalignment angles, there is weak evidence that the jets in HBLs are more well-aligned, suggesting that HBL jets are either intrinsically straighter or are seen further off-axis than LBL jets.
  • While BL Lacertae objects are widely believed to be highly beamed, low-luminosity radio galaxies, many radio-selected BL Lacs have extended radio power levels and optical emission lines that are too luminous to be low-luminosity radio galaxies. Also, Stocke & Rector discovered an excess of MgII absorption systems along BL Lac sightlines compared to quasars, suggesting that gravitational lensing may be another means of creating the BL Lac phenomenon in some cases. We present a search for gravitationally-lensed BL Lacs with deep, high-resolution, two-frequency VLA radio maps of seven lensing candidates from the 1 Jansky BL Lac sample. We find that none of these objects are resolved into an Einstein ring like B 0218+357, nor do any show multiple images of the core. All of the lensing candidates that were resolved show a flat-spectrum core and very unusual, steep-spectrum extended morphology that is incompatible with a multiply lensed system. Thus, while these observations do not rule out microlensing, no macrolensing is observed.
  • The rareness of blazars, combined with the previous history of relatively shallow, single-band surveys, has dramatically colored our perception of these objects. Despite a quarter-century of research, it is not at all clear whether current samples can be combined to give us a relatively unbiased view of blazar properties, or whether they present a view so heavily affected by biases inherent in single-band surveys that a synthesis is impossible. We will use the coverage of X-ray/radio flux space for existing surveys to assess their biases. Only new, deeper blazar surveys approach the level needed in depth and coverage of parameter space to give us a less biased view of blazars. These surveys have drastically increased our knowledge of blazars' properties. We will specifically review the discovery of ``blue'' blazars, objects with broad emission lines but broadband spectral characteristics similar to HBL BL Lac objects.
  • We describe a moderate-resolution (20-25 km/s) FUSE study of the low-redshift intergalactic medium. We report on studies of 7 extragalactic sightlines and 12 Ly-beta absorbers that correspond to Ly-alpha lines detected by HST/GHRS and STIS. These absorbers appear to contain a significant fraction of the low-z baryons and were a major discovery of the HST spectrographs. Using FUSE data, with 40 mA (4-sigma) Lyb detection limits, we have employed the equivalent width ratio of Lyb/Lya and occasionally higher Lyman lines, to determine the doppler parameter, b, and accurate column densities, N(HI), for moderately saturated lines. We detect Lyb absorption corresponding to all Lya lines with EW > 200 mA. The Lyb/Lya ratios yield a preliminary distribution function of doppler parameters, with mean <b> = 31.4 +/- 7.4 km/s and median b = 28 km/s, comparable to values at redshifts z = 2.0-2.5. If thermal, these b-values correspond to T(HI) ~ 50,000 K, although the inferred doppler parameters are considerably less than the widths derived from Lya profile fitting, <b(dopp)/b(width)> = 0.52. The typical increase in column density over that derived from profile fitting is Delta[log N(HI)] = 0.3, but ranges up to 1.0 dex. Our data suggest that the low-z Lya absorbers contain sizable non-thermal motions or velocity components in the line profile, perhaps arising from cosmological expansion and infall.