• The optical observations of Ic-4 supernova (SN) 2016coi/ASASSN-16fp, from $\sim 2$ to $\sim450$ days after explosion, are presented along with analysis of its physical properties. The SN shows the broad lines associated with SNe Ic-3/4 but with a key difference. The early spectra display a strong absorption feature at $\sim 5400$ \AA\ which is not seen in other SNe~Ic-3/4 at this epoch. This feature has been attributed to He I in the literature. Spectral modelling of the SN in the early photospheric phase suggests the presence of residual He in a C/O dominated shell. However, the behaviour of the He I lines are unusual when compared with He-rich SNe, showing relatively low velocities and weakening rather than strengthening over time. The SN is found to rise to peak $\sim 16$ d after core-collapse reaching a bolometric luminosity of Lp $\sim 3\times10^{42}$ \ergs. Spectral models, including the nebular epoch, show that the SN ejected $2.5-4$ \msun\ of material, with $\sim 1.5$ \msun\ below 5000 \kms, and with a kinetic energy of $(4.5-7)\times10^{51}$ erg. The explosion synthesised $\sim 0.14$ \msun\ of 56Ni. There are significant uncertainties in E(B-V)host and the distance however, which will affect Lp and MNi. SN 2016coi exploded in a host similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and away from star-forming regions. The properties of the SN and the host-galaxy suggest that the progenitor had $M_\mathrm{ZAMS}$ of $23-28$ \msun\ and was stripped almost entirely down to its C/O core at explosion.
  • We present a comparative study of absolute distances to a sample of very nearby, bright Type Ia supernovae (SNe) derived from high cadence, high signal-to-noise, multi-band photometric data. Our sample consists of four SNe: 2012cg, 2012ht, 2013dy and 2014J. We present new homogeneous, high-cadence photometric data in Johnson-Cousins BVRI and Sloan g'r'i'z' bands taken from two sites (Piszkesteto and Baja, Hungary), and the light curves are analyzed with publicly available light curve fitters (MLCS2k2, SNooPy2 and SALT2.4). When comparing the best-fit parameters provided by the different codes, it is found that the distance moduli of moderately-reddened SNe Ia agree within ~0.2 mag, and the agreement is even better (< 0.1 mag) for the highest signal-to-noise BVRI data. For the highly-reddened SN~2014J the dispersion of the inferred distance moduli is slightly higher. These SN-based distances are in good agreement with the Cepheid distances to their host galaxies. We conclude that the current state-of-the-art light curve fitters for Type Ia SNe can provide consistent absolute distance moduli having less than ~0.1 -- 0.2 mag uncertainty for nearby SNe. Still, there is room for future improvements to reach the desired ~0.05 mag accuracy in the absolute distance modulus.
  • We present continued radio follow-up observations of PTF11qcj, a highly energetic broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN), with a radio peak luminosity comparable to that of the $\gamma$-ray burst (GRB) associated SN 1998bw. The latest observations, carried out with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), extend up to $\sim$5 years after the PTF11qcj optical discovery. The radio light curve shows a double-peak profile, possibly associated with density variations in the circumstellar medium (CSM), or with the presence of an off-axis GRB jet. Optical spectra of PTF11qcj taken during both peaks of the radio light curve do not show the broad H$\alpha$ features typically expected from H-rich circumstellar interaction. Modeling of the second radio peak within the CSM interaction scenario requires a flatter density profile and an enhanced progenitor mass-loss rate compared to those required to model the first peak. Although our radio data alone cannot rule out the alternative scenario of an off-axis GRB powering the second radio peak, the implied off-axis GRB parameters are unusual compared to typical values found for cosmological long GRBs. Deep X-ray observations carried out around the time of the second radio peak could have helped distinguish between the density variation and off-axis GRB scenarios. Future VLBA measurements of the PTF11qcj radio ejecta may unambiguously rule out the off-axis GRB jet scenario.
  • V582 Aur is an FU Ori-type young eruptive star in outburst since $\sim$1985. The eruption is currently in a relatively constant plateau phase, with photometric and spectroscopic variability superimposed. Here we will characterize the progenitor of the outbursting object, explore its environment, and analyse the temporal evolution of the eruption. We are particularly interested in the physical origin of the two deep photometric dips, one occurred in 2012, and one is ongoing since 2016. We collected archival photographic plates, and carried out new optical, infrared, and millimeter wave photometric and spectroscopic observations between 2010 and 2017, with high sampling rate during the current minimum. Beside analysing the color changes during fading, we compiled multiepoch spectral energy distributions, and fitted them with a simple accretion disk model. Based on pre-outburst data and a millimeter continuum measurement, we suggest that the progenitor of the V582 Aur outburst is a low-mass T Tauri star with average properties. The mass of an unresolved circumstellar structure, probably a disk, is 0.04 M$_{\odot}$. The optical and near-infrared spectra demonstrate the presence of hydrogen and metallic lines, show the CO bandhead in absorption, and exhibit a variable H$\alpha$ profile. The color variations strongly indicate that both the $\sim$1 year long brightness dip in 2012, and the current minimum since 2016 are caused by increased extinction along the line of sight. According to our accretion disk models, the reddening changed from $A_V$=4.5 mag to 12.5 mag, while the accretion rate remained practically constant. Similarly to the models of the UXor phenomenon of intermediate and low-mass young stars, orbiting disk structures could be responsible for the eclipses.
  • We present the K2 light curves of a large sample of untargeted Main Belt asteroids (MBAs) detected with the Kepler space telescope. The asteroids were observed within the Uranus superstamp, a relatively large, continuous field with low stellar background designed to cover the planet Uranus and its moons during Campaign 8 of the K2 mission. The superstamp offered the possibility to obtain precise, uninterrupted light curves of a large number of MBAs and thus to determine unambiguous rotation rates for them. We obtained photometry for 608 MBAs, and were able to determine or estimate rotation rates for 90 targets, of which 86 had no known values before. In an additional 16 targets we detected incomplete cycles and/or eclipse-like events. We found the median rotation rate to be significantly longer than that of the ground-based observations indicating that the latter are biased towards shorter rotation rates. Our study highlights the need and benefits of further continuous photometry of asteroids.
  • JWST was conceived and built to answer one of the most fundamental questions that humans can address empirically: "How did the Universe make its first stars?". Our First Lights At REionization (FLARE) project transforms the quest for the epoch of reionization from the static to the time domain. It targets the complementary question: "What happened to those first stars?". It will be answered by observations of the most luminous events: supernovae and accretion on to black holes formed by direct collapse from the primordial gas clouds. These transients provide direct constraints on star-formation rates (SFRs) and the truly initial Initial Mass Function (IMF), and they may identify possible stellar seeds of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Furthermore, our knowledge of the physics of these events at ultra-low metallicity will be much expanded. JWST's unique capabilities will detect these most luminous and earliest cosmic messengers easily in fairly shallow observations. However, these events are very rare at the dawn of cosmic structure formation and so require large area coverage. Time domain astronomy can be advanced to an unprecedented depth by means of a shallow field of JWST reaching 27 mag AB in 2 and 4.4 microns over a field as large as 0.1 square degree visited multiple times each year. Such a survey may set strong constraints or detect massive Pop III SNe at redshifts beyond 10, pinpointing the redshift of the first stars, or at least their death. Based on our current knowledge of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), such a survey will find one or more SLSNe at redshifts above 6 in five years and possibly several direct collapse black holes. Although JWST is not designed as a wide field survey telescope, we show that such a wide field survey is possible with JWST and is critical in addressing several of its key scientific goals.
  • We report the first results from our long-term observational survey aimed at discovering late-time interaction between the ejecta of hydrogen-poor Type I supernovae and the hydrogen-rich envelope expelled from the progenitor star several decades/centuries before explosion. The expelled envelope, moving with a velocity of ~10 -- 100 km s$^{-1}$, is expected to be caught up by the fast-moving SN ejecta several years/decades after explosion depending on the history of the mass-loss process acting in the progenitor star prior to explosion. The collision between the SN ejecta and the circumstellar envelope results in net emission in the Balmer-lines, especially in H-alpha. We look for signs of late-time H-alpha emission in older Type Ia/Ibc/IIb SNe having hydrogen-poor ejecta, via narrow-band imaging. Continuum-subtracted H-alpha emission has been detected for 13 point sources: 9 SN Ibc, 1 SN IIb and 3 SN Ia events. Thirty-eight SN sites were observed on at least two epochs, from which three objects (SN 1985F, SN 2005kl, SN 2012fh) showed significant temporal variation in the strength of their H-alpha emission in our DIAFI data. This suggests that the variable emission is probably not due to nearby H II regions unassociated with the SN, and hence is an important additional hint that ejecta-CSM interaction may take place in these systems. Moreover, we successfully detected the late-time H-alpha emission from the Type Ib SN 2014C, which was recently discovered as a strongly interacting SN in various (radio, infrared, optical and X-ray) bands.
  • We present new deep UBVRI images and high-resolution multi-object optical spectroscopy of the young (~ 6 - 10 Myr old), relatively nearby (800 pc) open cluster IC 2395. We identify nearly 300 cluster members and use the photometry to estimate their spectral types, which extend from early B to middle M. We also present an infrared imaging survey of the central region using the IRAC and MIPS instruments on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, covering the wavelength range from 3.6 to 24 microns. Our infrared observations allow us to detect dust in circumstellar disks originating over a typical range of radii ~ 0.1 to ~ 10AU from the central star. We identify 18 Class II, 8 transitional disk, and 23 debris disk candidates, respectively 6.5%, 2.9%, and 8.3% of the cluster members with appropriate data. We apply the same criteria for transitional disk identification to 19 other stellar clusters and associations spanning ages from ~ 1 to ~ 18 Myr. We find that the number of disks in the transitional phase as a fraction of the total with strong 24 micron excesses ([8] - [24] > 1.5) increases from 8.4 +\- 1.3% at ~ 3 Myr to 46 +\- 5% at ~ 10 Myr. Alternative definitions of transitional disks will yield different percentages but should show the same trend.
  • Remote investigations of the ancient solar system matter has been traditionally carried out through the observations of long-period (LP) comets that are less affected by solar irradiation than the short-period counterparts orbiting much closer to the Sun. Here we summarize the results of our decade-long survey of the distant activity of LP comets. We found that the most important separation in the dataset is based on the dynamical nature of the objects. Dynamically new comets are characterized by a higher level of activity on average: the most active new comets in our sample can be characterized by afrho values >3--4 higher than that of our most active returning comets. New comets develop more symmetric comae, suggesting a generally isotropic outflow. Contrary to this, the coma of recurrent comets can be less symmetrical, ocassionally exhibiting negative slope parameters, suggesting sudden variations in matter production. The morphological appearance of the observed comets is rather diverse. A surprisingly large fraction of the comets have long, teniouos tails, but the presence of impressive tails does not show a clear correlation with the brightness of the comets.
  • HBC 722 (V2493 Cyg) is a young eruptive star in outburst since 2010. It is an FU Orionis-type object with an atypically low outburst luminosity. Because it was well characterized in the pre-outburst phase, HBC 722 is one of the few FUors where we can learn about the physical changes and processes associated with the eruption. We monitored the source in the BVRIJHKs bands from the ground, and at 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m from space with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We analyzed the light curves and the spectral energy distribution by fitting a series of steady accretion disk models at many epochs. We also analyzed the spectral properties of the source based on new optical and infrared spectra. We also mapped HBC 722 and its surroundings at millimeter wavelengths. From the light curve analysis we concluded that the first peak of the outburst in 2010 September was due to an abrupt increase of the accretion rate in the innermost part of the system. This was followed by a long term process, when the brightening was mainly due to a gradual increase of the accretion rate and the emitting area. Our new observations show that the source is currently in a constant plateau phase. We found that around the peak the continuum was bluer and the H$\alpha$ profile changed significantly between 2012 and 2013. The source was not detected in the millimeter continuum, but we discovered a flattened molecular gas structure with a diameter of 1700 au and mass of 0.3 M$_{\odot}$ centered on HBC 722. While the first brightness peak could be interpreted as a rapid fall of piled-up material from the inner disk onto the star, the later monotonic flux rise suggests the outward expansion of a hot component according to the theory of Bell & Lin (1994). Our study of HBC 722 demonstrated that accretion-related outbursts can occur in young stellar objects even with very low mass disks, in the late Class II phase.
  • The recent discovery of the unprecedentedly superluminous transient ASASSN-15lh (or SN 2015L) with its UV-bright secondary peak challenges all the power-input models that have been proposed for superluminous supernovae. Here we examine some of the few viable interpretations of ASASSN-15lh in the context of a stellar explosion, involving combinations of one or more power inputs. We model the lightcurve of ASASSN-15lh with a hybrid model that includes contributions from magnetar spin-down energy and hydrogen-poor circumstellar interaction. We also investigate models of pure circumstellar interaction with a massive hydrogen-deficient shell and discuss the lack of interaction features in the observed spectra. We find that, as a supernova ASASSN-15lh can be best modeled by the energetic core-collapse of a ~40 Msun star interacting with a hydrogen-poor shell of ~20 Msun. The circumstellar shell and progenitor mass are consistent with a rapidly rotating pulsational pair-instability supernova progenitor as required for strong interaction following the final supernova explosion. Additional energy injection by a magnetar with initial period of 1-2 ms and magnetic field of 0.1-1 x 10^14 G may supply the excess luminosity required to overcome the deficit in single-component models, but this requires more fine-tuning and extreme parameters for the magnetar, as well as the assumption of efficient conversion of magnetar energy into radiation. We thus favor a single-input model where the reverse shock formed in a strong SN ejecta-CSM interaction following a very powerful core-collapse SN explosion can supply the luminosity needed to reproduce the late-time UV-bright plateau.
  • We present extensive optical ($UBVRI$, $g'r'i'z'$, and open CCD) and near-infrared ($ZYJH$) photometry for the very nearby Type IIP SN ~2013ej extending from +1 to +461 days after shock breakout, estimated to be MJD $56496.9\pm0.3$. Substantial time series ultraviolet and optical spectroscopy obtained from +8 to +135 days are also presented. Considering well-observed SNe IIP from the literature, we derive $UBVRIJHK$ bolometric calibrations from $UBVRI$ and unfiltered measurements that potentially reach 2\% precision with a $B-V$ color-dependent correction. We observe moderately strong Si II $\lambda6355$ as early as +8 days. The photospheric velocity ($v_{\rm ph}$) is determined by modeling the spectra in the vicinity of Fe II $\lambda5169$ whenever observed, and interpolating at photometric epochs based on a semianalytic method. This gives $v_{\rm ph} = 4500\pm500$ km s$^{-1}$ at +50 days. We also observe spectral homogeneity of ultraviolet spectra at +10--12 days for SNe IIP, while variations are evident a week after explosion. Using the expanding photosphere method, from combined analysis of SN 2013ej and SN 2002ap, we estimate the distance to the host galaxy to be $9.0_{-0.6}^{+0.4}$ Mpc, consistent with distance estimates from other methods. Photometric and spectroscopic analysis during the plateau phase, which we estimated to be $94\pm7$ days long, yields an explosion energy of $0.9\pm0.3\times10^{51}$ ergs, a final pre-explosion progenitor mass of $15.2\pm4.2$~M$_\odot$ and a radius of $250\pm70$~R$_\odot$. We observe a broken exponential profile beyond +120 days, with a break point at +$183\pm16$ days. Measurements beyond this break time yield a $^{56}$Ni mass of $0.013\pm0.001$~M$_\odot$.
  • SN 2012dn is a super-Chandrasekhar mass candidate in a purportedly normal spiral (SAcd) galaxy, and poses a challenge for theories of type Ia supernova diversity. Here we utilize the fast and highly parameterized spectrum synthesis tool, SYNAPPS, to estimate relative expansion velocities of species inferred from optical spectra obtained with six facilities. As with previous studies of normal SN Ia, we find that both unburned carbon and intermediate mass elements are spatially coincident within the ejecta near and below 14,000 km/s. Although the upper limit on SN 2012dn's peak luminosity is comparable to some of the most luminous normal SN Ia, we find a progenitor mass exceeding ~1.6 Msun is not strongly favored by leading merger models since these models do not accurately predict spectroscopic observations of SN 2012dn and more normal events. In addition, a comparison of light curves and host-galaxy masses for a sample of literature and Palomar Transient Factory SN Ia reveals a diverse distribution of SN Ia subtypes where carbon-rich material remains unburned in some instances. Such events include SN 1991T, 1997br, and 1999aa where trace signatures of C III at optical wavelengths are presumably detected.
  • We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN 2013fc, a bright type II supernova (SN) in a circumnuclear star-forming ring in the luminous infrared galaxy ESO 154-G010, observed as part of the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey of Transient Objects (PESSTO). SN 2013fc is both photometrically and spectroscopically similar to the well-studied type IIn SN 1998S and to the bright type II-L SN 1979C. It exhibits an initial linear decline, followed by a short plateau phase and a tail phase with a decline too fast for $^{56}$Co decay with full gamma-ray trapping. Initially the spectrum was blue and featureless. Later on, a strong broad ($\sim 8000$ km s$^{-1}$) H $\alpha$ emission profile became prominent. We apply a Starlight stellar population model fit to the SN location (observed when the SN had faded) to estimate a high extinction of $A_V = 2.9 \pm 0.2$ mag and an age of $10_{-2}^{+3}$ Myr for the underlying cluster. We compare the SN to SNe 1998S and 1979C and discuss its possible progenitor star considering the similarities to these events. With a peak brightness of $B = -20.46 \pm 0.21$ mag, SN 2013fc is 0.9 mag brighter than SN 1998S and of comparable brightness to SN 1979C. We suggest that SN 2013fc was consistent with a massive red supergiant (RSG) progenitor. Recent mass loss probably due to a strong RSG wind created the circumstellar matter illuminated through its interaction with the SN ejecta. We also observe a near-infrared excess, possibly due to newly condensed dust.
  • SN 2013dy is a Type Ia supernova for which we have compiled an extraordinary dataset spanning from 0.1 to ~ 500 days after explosion. We present 10 epochs of ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared (NIR) spectra with HST/STIS, 47 epochs of optical spectra (15 of them having high resolution), and more than 500 photometric observations in the BVrRiIZYJH bands. SN 2013dy has a broad and slowly declining light curve (delta m(B) = 0.92 mag), shallow Si II 6355 absorption, and a low velocity gradient. We detect strong C II in our earliest spectra, probing unburned progenitor material in the outermost layers of the SN ejecta, but this feature fades within a few days. The UV continuum of SN 2013dy, which is strongly affected by the metal abundance of the progenitor star, suggests that SN 2013dy had a relatively high-metallicity progenitor. Examining one of the largest single set of high-resolution spectra for a SN Ia, we find no evidence of variable absorption from circumstellar material. Combining our UV spectra, NIR photometry, and high-cadence optical photometry, we construct a bolometric light curve, showing that SN 2013dy had a maximum luminosity of 10.0^{+4.8}_{-3.8} * 10^{42} erg/s. We compare the synthetic light curves and spectra of several models to SN 2013dy, finding that SN 2013dy is in good agreement with a solar-metallicity W7 model.
  • Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are very bright explosions that were only discovered recently and that show a preference for occurring in faint dwarf galaxies. Understanding why stellar evolution yields different types of stellar explosions in these environments is fundamental in order to both uncover the elusive progenitors of SLSNe and to study star formation in dwarf galaxies. In this paper, we present the first results of our project to study SUperluminous Supernova Host galaxIES, focusing on the sample for which we have obtained spectroscopy. We show that SLSNe-I and SLSNe-R (hydrogen-poor) often (~50% in our sample) occur in a class of galaxies that is known as Extreme Emission Line Galaxies (EELGs). The probability of this happening by chance is negligible and we therefore conclude that the extreme environmental conditions and the SLSN phenomenon are related. In contrast, SLSNe-II (hydrogen-rich) occur in more massive, more metal-rich galaxies with softer radiation fields. Therefore, if SLSNe-II constitute a uniform class, their progenitor systems are likely different from those of H-poor SLSNe. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are, on average, not found in as extreme environments as H-poor SLSNe. We propose that H-poor SLSNe result from the very first stars exploding in a starburst, even earlier than GRBs. This might indicate a bottom-light initial mass function in these systems. SLSNe present a novel method of selecting candidate EELGs independent of their luminosity.
  • We present follow-up observations of an optical transient (OT) discovered by ROTSE on Jan. 21, 2009. Photometric monitoring was carried out with ROTSE-IIIb in the optical and Swift in the UV up to +70 days after discovery. The light curve showed a fast rise time of ~10 days followed by a steep decline over the next 60 days, which was much faster than that implied by 56Ni - 56Co radioactive decay. The SDSS DR10 database contains a faint, red object at the position of the OT, which appears slightly extended. This and other lines of evidence suggest that the OT is of extragalactic origin, and this faint object is likely the host galaxy. A sequence of optical spectra obtained with the 9.2-m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) between +8 and +45 days after discovery revealed a hot, blue continuum with no visible spectral features. A few weak features that appeared after +30 days probably originated from the underlying host. Fitting synthetic templates to the observed spectrum of the host galaxy revealed a redshift of z = 0.19. At this redshift the peak magnitude of the OT is close to -22.5, similar to the brightest super-luminous supernovae; however, the lack of identifiable spectral features makes the massive stellar death hypothesis less likely. A more plausible explanation appears to be the tidal disruption of a sun-like star by the central super-massive black hole. We argue that this transient likely belongs to a class of super-Eddington tidal disruption events.
  • We present ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared observations of SN 2012ap, a broad-lined Type Ic supernova in the galaxy NGC 1729 that produced a relativistic and rapidly decelerating outflow without a gamma-ray burst signature. Photometry and spectroscopy follow the flux evolution from -13 to +272 days past the B-band maximum of -17.4 +/- 0.5 mag. The spectra are dominated by Fe II, O I, and Ca II absorption lines at ejecta velocities of 20,000 km/s that change slowly over time. Other spectral absorption lines are consistent with contributions from photospheric He I, and hydrogen may also be present at higher velocities (> 27,000 km/s). We use these observations to estimate explosion properties and derive a total ejecta mass of 2.7 Msolar, a kinetic energy of 1.0x10^{52} erg, and a 56Ni mass of 0.1-0.2 Msolar. Nebular spectra (t > 200d) exhibit an asymmetric double-peaked [OI] 6300,6364 emission profile that we associate with absorption in the supernova interior, although toroidal ejecta geometry is an alternative explanation. SN 2012ap joins SN 2009bb as another exceptional supernova that shows evidence for a central engine (e.g., black-hole accretion or magnetar) capable of launching a non-negligible portion of ejecta to relativistic velocities without a coincident gamma-ray burst detection. Defining attributes of their progenitor systems may be related to notable properties including above-average environmental metallicities of Z > Zsolar, moderate to high levels of host-galaxy extinction (E(B-V) > 0.4 mag), detection of high-velocity helium at early epochs, and a high relative flux ratio of [Ca II]/[O I] > 1 at nebular epochs. These events support the notion that jet activity at various energy scales may be present in a wide range of supernovae.
  • We present optical and near infrared (NIR) observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2014J. Seventeen optical and twenty-three NIR spectra were obtained from 10 days before ($-$10d) to 10 days after (+10d) the time of maximum $B$-band brightness. The relative strengths of absorption features and their patterns of development can be compared at one day intervals throughout most of this period. Carbon is not detected in the optical spectra, but we identify CI $\lambda$ 1.0693 in the NIR spectra. We find that MgII lines with high oscillator strengths have higher initial velocities than other MgII lines. We show that the velocity differences can be explained by differences in optical depths due to oscillator strengths. The spectra of SN 2014J show it is a normal SN Ia, but many parameters are near the boundaries between normal and high-velocity subclasses. The velocities for OI, MgII, SiII, SII, CaII and FeII suggest that SN 2014J has a layered structure with little or no mixing. That result is consistent with the delayed detonation explosion models. We also report photometric observations, obtained from $-$10d to +29d, in the $UBVRIJH$ and $K_s$ bands. SN 2014J is about 3 magnitudes fainter than a normal SN Ia at the distance of M82, which we attribute to extinction in the host. The template fitting package SNooPy is used to interpret the light curves and to derive photometric parameters. Using $R_V$ = 1.46, which is consistent with previous studies, SNooPy finds that $A_V = 1.80$ for $E(B-V)_{host}=1.23 \pm 0.01$ mag. The maximum $B$-band brightness of $-19.19 \pm 0.10$ mag was reached on February 1.74 UT $ \pm 0.13$ days and the supernova had a decline parameter of $\Delta m_{15}=1.11 \pm 0.02$ mag.
  • The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are absorption features observed in optical and near-infrared spectra that are thought to be associated with carbon-rich polyatomic molecules in interstellar gas. However, because the central wavelengths of these bands do not correspond with electronic transitions of any known atomic or molecular species, their nature has remained uncertain since their discovery almost a century ago. Here we report on unusually strong DIBs in optical spectra of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova SN 2012ap that exhibit changes in equivalent width over short (~30 days) timescales. The 4428 and 6283 Angstrom DIB features get weaker with time, whereas the 5780 Angstrom feature shows a marginal increase. These nonuniform changes suggest that the supernova is interacting with a nearby source of the DIBs and that the DIB carriers possess high ionization potentials, such as small cations or charged fullerenes. We conclude that moderate-resolution spectra of supernovae with DIB absorptions obtained within weeks of outburst could reveal unique information about the mass-loss environment of their progenitor systems and provide new constraints on the properties of DIB carriers.
  • We present ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SN 2009N in NGC 4487. This object is a type II-P supernova with spectra resembling those of subluminous II-P supernovae, while its bolometric luminosity is similar to that of the intermediate luminosity SN 2008in. We created SYNOW models of the plateau phase spectra for line identification and to measure the expansion velocity. In the near-infrared spectra we find signs indicating possible weak interaction between the supernova ejecta and the pre-existing circumstellar material. These signs are also present in the previously unpublished near-infrared spectra of SN 2008in. The distance to SN 2009N is determined via the expanding photosphere method and the standard candle method as $D= 21.6 \pm 1.1\,{\mathrm {Mpc}}$. The produced nickel-mass is estimated to be $\sim 0.020 \pm 0.004\,{\mathrm M_\odot}$. We infer the physical properties of the progenitor at the explosion through hydrodynamical modelling of the observables. We find the values of the total energy as $\sim 0.48 \times 10^{51}\, {\mathrm {erg}}$, the ejected mass as $\sim 11.5\,{\mathrm M_\odot}$, and the initial radius as $\sim 287\,{\mathrm R_\odot}$.
  • We present fits of generalized semi-analytic supernova (SN) light curve (LC) models for a variety of power inputs including Ni-56 and Co-56 radioactive decay, magnetar spin-down, and forward and reverse shock heating due to supernova ejecta-circumstellar matter (CSM) interaction. We apply our models to the observed LCs of the H-rich Super Luminous Supernovae (SLSN-II) SN 2006gy, SN 2006tf, SN 2008am, SN 2008es, CSS100217, the H-poor SLSN-I SN 2005ap, SCP06F6, SN 2007bi, SN 2010gx and SN 2010kd as well as to the interacting SN 2008iy and PTF09uj. Our goal is to determine the dominant mechanism that powers the LCs of these extraordinary events and the physical conditions involved in each case. We also present a comparison of our semi-analytical results with recent results from numerical radiation hydrodynamics calculations in the particular case of SN 2006gy in order to explore the strengths and weaknesses of our models. We find that CS shock heating produced by ejecta-CSM interaction provides a better fit to the LCs of most of the events we examine. We discuss the possibility that collision of supernova ejecta with hydrogen-deficient CSM accounts for some of the hydrogen-deficient SLSNe (SLSN-I) and may be a plausible explanation for the explosion mechanism of SN 2007bi, the pair-instability supernova (PISN) candidate. We characterize and discuss issues of parameter degeneracy.
  • The 2012 explosion of SN2009ip raises questions about our understanding of the late stages of massive star evolution. Here we present a comprehensive study of SN2009ip during its remarkable re-brightening(s). High-cadence photometric and spectroscopic observations from the GeV to the radio band obtained from a variety of ground-based and space facilities (including the VLA, Swift, Fermi, HST and XMM) constrain SN2009ip to be a low energy (E~ 10^50 erg for an ejecta mass ~ 0.5 Msun) and likely asymmetric explosion in a complex medium shaped by multiple eruptions of the restless progenitor star. Most of the energy is radiated as a result of the shock breaking out through a dense shell of material located at 5x10^14 cm with M~0.1 Msun, ejected by the precursor outburst ~40 days before the major explosion. We interpret the NIR excess of emission as signature of dust vaporization of material located further out (R>4x 10^15 cm), the origin of which has to be connected with documented mass loss episodes in the previous years. Our modeling predicts bright neutrino emission associated with the shock break-out if the cosmic ray energy is comparable to the radiated energy. We connect this phenomenology with the explosive ejection of the outer layers of the massive progenitor star, that later interacted with material deposited in the surroundings by previous eruptions. Future observations will reveal if the luminous blue variable (LBV) progenitor star survived. Irrespective of whether the explosion was terminal, SN2009ip brought to light the existence of new channels for sustained episodic mass-loss, the physical origin of which has yet to be identified.
  • We present time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry of CSS 120422:111127+571239 (= SBS1108+574), a recently discovered SU UMa-type dwarf nova whose 55-minute orbital period is well below the CV period minimum of ~78 minutes. In contrast with most other known CVs, its spectrum features He I emission of comparable strength to the Balmer lines, implying a hydrogen abundance less than 0.1 of long period CVs---but still at least 10 times higher than than in AM CVn stars. Together, the short orbital period and remarkable helium-to-hydrogen ratio suggest that mass transfer in "CSS 1204" began near the end of the donor star's main-sequence lifetime, meaning that the system is probably an AM CVn progenitor as described by Podsiadlowski, Han, and Rappaport (2003). Moreover, a Doppler tomogram of the Halpha line reveals two distinct regions of enhanced emission. While one is the result of the stream-disk impact, the other is probably attributable to spiral disk structure generated when material in the outer disk achieves a 2:1 orbital resonance with respect to the donor.
  • We present the low-resolution spectroscopic and UBVRI broad-band photometric investigations of the Type IIb supernova 2011fu, discovered in UGC 01626. The photometric follow-up of this event has been initiated a few days after the explosion and covers a period of about 175 days. The early-phase light curve shows a rise followed by steep decay in all bands and shares properties very similar to that seen in case of SN 1993J, with a possible detection of the adiabatic cooling phase. Modelling of the quasi-bolometric light curve suggests that the progenitor had an extended ($\sim 1 \times 10^{13}$ cm), low-mass ($\sim 0.1$ $M_\odot$) H-rich envelope on top of a dense, compact ($\sim 2 \times 10^{11}$ cm), more massive ($\sim$ 1.1 $M_\odot$) He-rich core. The nickel mass synthesized during the explosion was found to be $\sim$ 0.21 $M_\odot$, slightly larger than seen in case of other Type IIb SNe. The spectral modelling performed with SYNOW suggests that the early-phase line velocities for H and Fe\,{\sc ii} features were $\sim 16000$ km s$^{-1}$ and $\sim 14000$ km s$^{-1}$, respectively. Then the velocities declined up to day +40 and became nearly constant at later epochs.