• Context. Transit events of extrasolar planets offer the opportunity to study the composition of their atmospheres. Previous work on transmission spectroscopy of the close-in gas giant TrES-3 b revealed an increase in absorption towards blue wavelengths of very large amplitude in terms of atmospheric pressure scale heights, too large to be explained by Rayleigh-scattering in the planetary atmosphere. Aims. We present a follow-up study of the optical transmission spectrum of the hot Jupiter TrES-3 b to investigate the strong increase in opacity towards short wavelengths found by a previous study. Furthermore, we aim to estimate the effect of stellar spots on the transmission spectrum. Methods. This work uses previously published long slit spectroscopy transit data of the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) and published broad band observations as well as new observations in different bands from the near-UV to the near-IR, for a homogeneous transit light curve analysis. Additionally, a long-term photometric monitoring of the TrES-3 host star was performed. Results. Our newly analysed GTC spectroscopic transit observations show a slope of much lower amplitude than previous studies. We conclude from our results the previously reported increasing signal towards short wavelengths is not intrinsic to the TrES-3 system. Furthermore, the broad band spectrum favours a flat spectrum. Long-term photometric monitoring rules out a significant modification of the transmission spectrum by unocculted star spots.
  • We searched for the $CP$-violating rare decay of neutral kaon, $K_{L} \to \pi^0 \nu \overline{\nu}$, in data from the first 100 hours of physics running in 2013 of the J-PARC KOTO experiment. One candidate event was observed while $0.34\pm0.16$ background events were expected. We set an upper limit of $5.1\times10^{-8}$ for the branching fraction at the 90\% confidence level (C.L.). An upper limit of $3.7\times10^{-8}$ at the 90\% C.L. for the $K_{L} \to \pi^{0} X^{0}$decay was also set for the first time, where $X^{0}$ is an invisible particle with a mass of 135 MeV/$c^{2}$.
  • We examined light curves of 1138 stars brighter than 18.0 mag in the $I$ band and less than a mean magnitude error of 0.1 mag in the $V$ band from the OGLE-III eclipsing binary catalogue, and found 90 new binary systems exhibiting apsidal motion. In this study, the samples of apsidal motion stars in the SMC were increased by a factor of about 3 than previously known. In order to determine the period of the apsidal motion for the binaries, we analysed in detail both the light curves and eclipse timings using the MACHO and OGLE photometric database. For the eclipse timing diagrams of the systems, new times of minimum light were derived from the full light curve combined at intervals of one year from the survey data. The new 90 binaries have apsidal motion periods in the range of 12$-$897 years. An additional short-term oscillation was detected in four systems (OGLE-SMC-ECL-1634, 1947, 3035, and 4946), which most likely arises from the existence of a third body orbiting each eclipsing binary. Since the systems presented here are based on homogeneous data and have been analysed in the same way, they are suitable for further statistical analysis.
  • Most hot Jupiters are expected to spiral in towards their host stars due to transfering of the angular momentum of the orbital motion to the stellar spin. Their orbits can also precess due to planet-star interactions. Calculations show that both effects could be detected for the very-hot exoplanet WASP-12 b using the method of precise transit timing over a timespan of the order of 10 yr. We acquired new precise light curves for 29 transits of WASP-12 b, spannning 4 observing seasons from November 2012 to February 2016. New mid-transit times, together with literature ones, were used to refine the transit ephemeris and analyse the timing residuals. We find that the transit times of WASP-12 b do not follow a linear ephemeris with a 5 sigma confidence level. They may be approximated with a quadratic ephemeris that gives a rate of change in the orbital period of -2.56 +/- 0.40 x 10^{-2} s/yr. The tidal quality parameter of the host star was found to be equal to 2.5 x 10^5 that is comparable to theoretical predictions for Sun-like stars. We also consider a model, in which the observed timing residuals are interpreted as a result of the apsidal precession. We find, however, that this model is statistically less probable than the orbital decay.
  • The KOTO ($K^0$ at Tokai) experiment aims to observe the CP-violating rare decay $K_L \rightarrow \pi^0 \nu \bar{\nu}$ by using a long-lived neutral-kaon beam produced by the 30 GeV proton beam at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. The $K_L$ flux is an essential parameter for the measurement of the branching fraction. Three $K_L$ neutral decay modes, $K_L \rightarrow 3\pi^0$, $K_L \rightarrow 2\pi^0$, and $K_L \rightarrow 2\gamma$ were used to measure the $K_L$ flux in the beam line in the 2013 KOTO engineering run. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the detector acceptance for these decays. Agreement was found between the simulation model and the experimental data, and the remaining systematic uncertainty was estimated at the 1.4\% level. The $K_L$ flux was measured as $(4.183 \pm 0.017_{\mathrm{stat.}} \pm 0.059_{\mathrm{sys.}}) \times 10^7$ $K_L$ per $2\times 10^{14}$ protons on a 66-mm-long Au target.
  • Algol ($\beta$ Persei) is the prototypical semi-detached eclipsing binary and a hierarchical triple system. From 2006 to 2010 we obtained 121 high-resolution and high-S/N \'{e}chelle spectra of this object. Spectral disentangling yields the individual spectra of all three stars, and greatly improved elements both the inner and outer orbits. We find masses of $M_{\rm A} = 3.39\pm0.06$ M$_\odot$, $M_{\rm B} = 0.770\pm0.009$ M$_\odot$ and $M_{\rm C} = 1.58\pm0.09$ M$_\odot$. The disentangled spectra also give the light ratios between the components in the $B$ and $V$ bands. Atmospheric parameters for the three stars are determined, including detailed elemental abundances for Algol A and Algol C. We find the following effective temperatures: $T_{\rm A} = 12\,550\pm120$ K, $T_{\rm B} = 4900\pm300$ K and $T_{\rm C} = 7550\pm250$ K. The projected rotational velocities are $v_{\rm A} \sin i_{\rm A} = 50.8\pm0.8$ km/s, $v_{\rm B} \sin i_{\rm B} = 62\pm2$ km/s and $v_{\rm C} \sin i_{\rm C} = 12.4\pm0.6$ km/s. This is the first measurement of the rotational velocity for Algol B, and confirms that it is synchronous with the orbital motion. The abundance patterns of components A and C are identical to within the measurement errors, and are basically solar. They can be summarised as mean metal abundances: [M/H]$_{\rm A} = -0.03\pm0.08$ and [M/H]$_{\rm C} = 0.04\pm0.09$. A carbon deficiency is confirmed for Algol A, with tentative indications for a slight overabundance of nitrogen. The ratio of their abundances is (C/N)$_{\rm A} = 2.0\pm0.4$, half of the solar value of (C/N)$_{\odot} = 4.0\pm0.7$. The new results derived in this study, including detailed abundances and metallicities, will enable tight constraints on theoretical evolutionary models for this complex system.
  • Forward calorimetry in the PHOBOS detector has been used to study charged hadron production in d+Au, p+Au and n+Au collisions at sqrt(s_nn) = 200 GeV. The forward proton calorimeter detectors are described and a procedure for determining collision centrality with these detectors is detailed. The deposition of energy by deuteron spectator nucleons in the forward calorimeters is used to identify p+Au and n+Au collisions in the data. A weighted combination of the yield of p+Au and n+Au is constructed to build a reference for Au+Au collisions that better matches the isospin composition of the gold nucleus. The p_T and centrality dependence of the yield of this improved reference system is found to match that of d+Au. The shape of the charged particle transverse momentum distribution is observed to extrapolate smoothly from pbar+p to central d+Au as a function of the charged particle pseudorapidity density. The asymmetry of positively- and negatively-charged hadron production in p+Au is compared to that of n+Au. No significant asymmetry is observed at mid-rapidity. These studies augment recent results from experiments at the LHC and RHIC facilities to give a more complete description of particle production in p+A and d+A collisions, essential for the understanding the medium produced in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.
  • The analysis of eclipsing binaries containing non-radial pulsators allows: i) to combine two different and independent sources of information on the internal structure and evolutionary status of the components, and ii) to study the effects of tidal forces on pulsations. KIC 3858884 is a bright Kepler target whose light curve shows deep eclipses, complex pulsation patterns with pulsation frequencies typical of {\delta} Sct, and a highly eccentric orbit. We present the result of the analysis of Kepler photometry and of high resolution phaseresolved spectroscopy. Spectroscopy yielded both the radial velocity curves and, after spectral disentangling, the primary component effective temperature and metallicity, and line-of-sight projected rotational velocities. The Kepler light curve was analyzed with an iterative procedure devised to disentangle eclipses from pulsations which takes into account the visibility of the pulsating star during eclipses. The search for the best set of binary parameters was performed combining the synthetic light curve models with a genetic minimization algorithm, which yielded a robust and accurate determination of the system parameters. The binary components have very similar masses (1.88 and 1.86 Msun) and effective temperatures (6800 and 6600 K), but different radii (3.45 and 3.05 Rsun). The comparison with the theoretical models evidenced a somewhat different evolutionary status of the components and the need of introducing overshooting in the models. The pulsation analysis indicates a hybrid nature of the pulsating (secondary) component, the corresponding high order g-modes might be excited by an intrinsic mechanism or by tidal forces.
  • The transiting planet WASP-12 b was identified as a potential target for transit timing studies because a departure from a linear ephemeris was reported in the literature. Such deviations could be caused by an additional planet in the system. We attempt to confirm the existence of claimed variations in transit timing and interpret its origin. We organised a multi-site campaign to observe transits by WASP-12 b in three observing seasons, using 0.5-2.6-metre telescopes. We obtained 61 transit light curves, many of them with sub-millimagnitude precision. The simultaneous analysis of the best-quality datasets allowed us to obtain refined system parameters, which agree with values reported in previous studies. The residuals versus a linear ephemeris reveal a possible periodic signal that may be approximated by a sinusoid with an amplitude of 0.00068+/-0.00013 d and period of 500+/-20 orbital periods of WASP-12 b. The joint analysis of timing data and published radial velocity measurements results in a two-planet model which better explains observations than single-planet scenarios. We hypothesize that WASP-12 b might be not the only planet in the system and there might be the additional 0.1 M_Jup body on a 3.6-d eccentric orbit. A dynamical analysis indicates that the proposed two-planet system is stable over long timescales.
  • We report on several new basic properties of a parabolic dot in the presence of a magnetic field. The ratio between the potential strength and the Landau level (LL) energy spacing serves as the coupling constant of this problem. In the weak coupling limit the energy spectrum in each Hilbert subspace of an angular momentum consists of discrete LLs of graphene. In the intermediate coupling regime non-resonant states form a closely spaced energy spectrum. We find, counter-intuitively, that resonant quasi-boundstates of both positive and negative energies exist in the spectrum. The presence of resonant quasi-boundstates of negative energies are a unique property of massless Dirac fermions. As the strong coupling limit is approached resonant and non-resonant states transform into anomalous states, whose probability densities develop a narrow peak inside the well and another broad peak under the potential barrier. These properties may investigated experimentally by measuring optical transition energies that can be described by a scaling function of the coupling constant.
  • We have investigated, using effective mass approach (EMA), magnetic properties of a one-dimensional electron gas in graphene armchair ribbons when the electrons of occupy only the lowest conduction subband. We find that magnetic properties of the one-dimensional electron gas may depend sensitively on the width of the ribbon. For ribbon widths $L_x=3Ma_0$, a critical point separates ferromagnetic and paramagnetic states while for $L_x=(3M+1)a_0$ paramagnetic state is stable ($M$ is an integer and $a_{0}$ is the length of the unit cell). These width-dependent properties are a consequence of eigenstates that have a subtle width-dependent mixture of $\mathbf{K}$ and $\mathbf{K'}$ states, and can be understood by examining the wavefunction overlap that appears in the expression for the many-body exchange self-energy. Ferromagnetic and paramagnetic states may be used for spintronic purposes.
  • We present a new observational campaign, DWARF, aimed at detection of circumbinary extrasolar planets using the timing of the minima of low-mass eclipsing binaries. The observations will be performed within an extensive network of relatively small to medium-size telescopes with apertures of ~20-200 cm. The starting sample of the objects to be monitored contains (i) low-mass eclipsing binaries with M and K components, (ii) short-period binaries with sdB or sdO component, and (iii) post-common-envelope systems containing a WD, which enable to determine minima with high precision. Since the amplitude of the timing signal increases with the orbital period of an invisible third component, the timescale of project is long, at least 5-10 years. The paper gives simple formulas to estimate suitability of individual eclipsing binaries for the circumbinary planet detection. Intrinsic variability of the binaries (photospheric spots, flares, pulsation etc.) limiting the accuracy of the minima timing is also discussed. The manuscript also describes the best observing strategy and methods to detect cyclic timing variability in the minima times indicating presence of circumbinary planets. First test observation of the selected targets are presented.
  • In a recent study, Lee et al. presented new photometric follow-up timing observations of the semi-detached binary system SZ Herculis and proposed the existence of two hierarchical cirumbinary companions. Based on the light-travel time effect, the two low-mass M-dwarf companions are found to orbit the binary pair on moderate to high eccentric orbits. The derived periods of these two companions are close to a 2:1 mean-motion orbital resonance. We have studied the stability of the system using the osculating orbital elements as presented by Lee et al. Results indicate an orbit-crossing architecture exhibiting short-term dynamical instabilities leading to the escape of one of the proposed companions. We have examined the system's underlying model parameter-space by following a Monte Carlo approach and found an improved fit to the timing data. A study of the stability of our best-fitting orbits also indicates that the proposed system is generally unstable. If the observed anomalous timing variations of the binary period is due to additional circumbinary companions, then the resulting system should exhibit a long-term stable orbital configuration much different from the orbits suggested by Lee et al. We, therefore, suggest that based on Newtonian-dynamical considerations, the proposed quadruple system cannot exist. To uncover the true nature of the observed period variations of this system, we recommend future photometric follow-up observations that could further constrain eclipse-timing variations and/or refine light-travel time models.
  • A detailed analysis of new and existing photometric, spectroscopic and spatial distribution data of the eccentric binary V731 Cep was performed. Spectroscopic orbital elements of the system were obtained by means of cross-correlation technique. According to the solution of radial velocities with UBVRcIc light curves, V731 Cep consists of two main-sequence stars with masses M$_{1}$=2.577 (0.098) M$_{\odot}$, M$_{2}$=2.017 (0.084) M$_{\odot}$, radii R$_{1}$=1.823 (0.030) R$_{\odot}$, R$_{2}$=1.717 (0.025) R$_{\odot}$, and temperatures T$_{eff1}$=10700 (200) K, T$_{eff2}$=9265 (220) K separated from each other by a=23.27 (0.29) R$_{\odot}$ in an orbit with inclination of 88$^{\circ}$.70 (0.03). Analysis of the O--C residuals yielded a rather long apsidal motion period of U=10000(2500) yr compared to the observational history of the system. The relativistic contribution to the observed rates of apsidal motion for V731 Cep is significant (76%). The combination of the absolute dimensions and the apsidal motion properties of the system yielded consistent observed internal structure parameter (log$\bar{k}_{2,obs}$=-2.36) compared to the theory (log$\bar{k}_{2,theo}$=-2.32). Evolutionary investigation of the binary by two methods (Bayesian and evolutionary tracks) shows that the system is t=133(26) Myr old and has a metallicity of [M/H]=-0.04(0.02) dex. The similarities in the spatial distribution and evolutionary properties of V731 Cep with the nearby ($\rho\sim3^{\circ}$.9) open cluster NGC 7762 suggests that V731 Cep could have been evaporated from NGC 7762.