• Kondo-based semimetals and semiconductors are of extensive current interest as a viable platform for strongly correlated states. It is thus important to understand the routes towards such dilute-carrier correlated states. One established pathway is through Kondo effect in metallic non-magnetic analogues. Here we advance a new mechanism, through which Kondo-based semimetals develop out of conduction electrons with a low carrier-density in the presence of an even number of rare-earth sites. We demonstrate this effect by studying the Kondo material Yb3Ir4Ge13 along with its closed-f-shell counterpart, Lu3Ir4Ge13. Through magnetotransport, optical conductivity and thermodynamic measurements, we establish that the correlated semimetallic state of Yb3Ir4Ge13 below its Kondo temperature originates from the Kondo effect of a low carrier conduction-electron background. In addition, it displays fragile magnetism at very low temperatures, which, in turn, can be tuned to a non Fermi liquid regime through Lu-for-Yb substitution. These findings are connected with recent theoretical studies in simplified models. Our results open an entirely new venue to explore the strong correlation physics in a semimetallic environment.
  • Neutron scattering studies have been carried out on polycrystalline samples of a series of rare earth intermetallic compounds RCuAs$_2$ (R = Pr, Nd, Dy, Tb, Ho and Yb) as a function of temperature to determine the magnetic structures and the order parameters. These compounds crystallize in the ZrCuSi$_2$ type structure, which is similar to that of the RFeAsO (space group P4/nmm) class of iron-based superconductors. PrCuAs$_2$ develops commensurate magnetic order with K = (0, 0, 0.5) below T$_N$ = 6.4 (2) K, with the ordered moments pointing along the c-axis. The irreducible representation analysis shows either a ${\Gamma}$$^1_2$ or ${\Gamma}$$^1_3$ representation. NdCuAs$_2$ and DyCuAs$_2$ order below T$_N$ = 3.54(5) K and T$_N$ = 10.1(2) K, respectively, with the same ordering wave vector but the moments lying in the a-b plane (with a ${\Gamma}$$^2_9$ or ${\Gamma}$$^2_{10}$ representation). TbCuAs$_2$ and HoCuAs$_2$ exhibit incommensurate magnetic structures below T$_N$ = 9.44(7) and 4.41(2) K, respectively. For TbCuAs$_2$, two separate magnetic ordering wave vectors are established as K$_{1(Tb)}$ = (0.240,0.155,0.48) and K$_{2(Tb)}$ = (0.205, 0.115, 0.28), whereas HoCuAs$_2$ forms a single K$_{(Ho)}$ = (0.121, 0.041, 0.376) magnetic structure with 3$^{rd}$ order harmonic magnetic peaks. YbCuAs$_2$ does not exhibit any magnetic Bragg peaks at 1.5 K, while susceptibility measurements indicate an antiferromagnetic-like transition at 4 K, suggesting that either the ordering is not long range in nature or the ordered moment is below the sensitivity limit of $\approx$ 0.2 $\mu_B$.
  • The low-temperature magnetic phases in the layered honeycomb lattice material $\alpha$-RuCl$_3$ have been studied as a function of in-plane magnetic field. In zero field this material orders magnetically below 7 K with so-called zigzag order within the honeycomb planes. Neutron diffraction data show that a relatively small applied field of 2 T is sufficient to suppress the population of the magnetic domain in which the zigzag chains run along the field direction. We found that the intensity of the magnetic peaks due to zigzag order is continuously suppressed with increasing field until their disappearance at $\mu_o$H$_c$=8 T. At still higher fields (above 8 T) the zigzag order is destroyed, while bulk magnetization and heat capacity measurements suggest that the material enters a state with gapped magnetic excitations. We discuss the magnetic phase diagram obtained in our study in the context of a quantum phase transition.
  • An essential step toward elucidating the mechanism of superconductivity is to determine the sign/phase of superconducting order parameter, as it is closely related to the pairing interaction. In conventional superconductors, the electron-phonon interaction induces attraction between electrons near the Fermi energy and results in a sign-preserved s-wave pairing. For high-temperature superconductors, including cuprates and iron-based superconductors, prevalent weak coupling theories suggest that the electron pairing is mediated by spin fluctuations which lead to repulsive interactions, and therefore that a sign-reversed pairing with an s+-or d-wave symmetry is favored. Here, by using magnetic neutron scattering, a phase sensitive probe of superconducting gap, we report the observation of a transition from the sign-reversed to sign-preserved Cooper-pairing symmetry with insignificant changes in Tc in the S-doped iron selenide superconductors KxFe2-y(Se1-zSz)2. We show that a rather sharp magnetic resonant mode well below the superconducting gap (2delta) in the undoped sample (z = 0) is replaced by a broad hump structure above 2delta under 50% S doping. These results cannot be readily explained by simple spin fluctuation-exchange pairing theories and, therefore, multiple pairing channels are required to describe superconductivity in this system. Our findings may also yield a simple explanation for the sometimes contradictory data on the sign of the superconducting order parameter in iron-based materials.
  • A hidden order that emerges in the frustrated pyrochlore Tb$_{2+x}$Ti$_{2-x}$O$_{7+y}$ with $T_{\text{c}}=0.53$ K is studied using specific heat, magnetization, and neutron scattering experiments on a high-quality single crystal. Semi-quantitative analyses based on a pseudospin-1/2 Hamiltonian for ionic non-Kramers magnetic doublets demonstrate that it is an ordered state of electric quadrupole moments. The elusive spin liquid state of the nominal Tb$_2$Ti$_2$O$_7$ is most likely a U(1) quantum spin-liquid state.
  • The evolution of the electronic properties of electron-doped (Sr{1-x}La{x})2IrO4 is experimentally explored as the doping limit of La is approached. As electrons are introduced, the electronic ground state transitions from a spin-orbit Mott phase into an electronically phase separated state, where long-range magnetic order vanishes beyond x = 0.02 and charge transport remains percolative up to the limit of La substitution (x~0.06). In particular, the electronic ground state remains inhomogeneous even beyond the collapse of the parent state's long-range antiferromagnetic order, while persistent short-range magnetism survives up to the highest La-substitution levels. Furthermore, as electrons are doped into Sr2IrO4, we observe the appearance of a low temperature magnetic glass-like state intermediate to the complete suppression of antiferromagnetic order. Universalities and differences in the electron-doped phase diagrams of single layer and bilayer Ruddlesden-Popper strontium iridates are discussed.
  • Most unconventional superconductors, including cuprates and iron-based superconductors, are derived from chemical doping or application of pressure on their collinearly magnetic-ordered parent compounds[1-5]. The recently discovered pressure-induced superconductor CrAs, as a rare example of a non-collinear helimagnetic superconductor, has therefore generated great interest in understanding microscopic magnetic properties and their interplay with superconductivity [6-8]. Unlike cuprates and iron based superconductors where the magnetic moment direction barely changes upon doping, here we show that CrAs exhibits a spin reorientation from the ab plane to the ac plane, along with an abrupt drop of the magnetic propagation vector at a critical pressure (Pc~0.6 GPa). This magnetic phase transition coincides with the emergence of bulk superconductivity, indicating a direct connection between magnetism and superconductivity. With further increasing pressure, the magnetic order completely disappears near the optimal Tc regime (P~0.94 GPa). Moreover, the Cr magnetic moments between nearest neighbors tend to be aligned antiparallel with increasing pressure toward the optimal superconductivity regime. Our findings suggest that the non-collinear helimagnetic order is strongly coupled to structural and electronic degrees of freedom, and that antiferromagnetic correlations associated with the low magnetic vector phase are crucial for superconductivity.
  • We use inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to study the spin excitations in partially detwinned NaFe$_{0.985}$Co$_{0.015}$As which has coexisting static antiferromagnetic (AF) order and superconductivity ($T_c=15$ K, $T_N=30$ K). In previous INS work on a twinned sample, spin excitations form a dispersive sharp resonance near $E_{r1}=3.25$ meV and a broad dispersionless mode at $E_{r1}=6$ meV at the AF ordering wave vector ${\bf Q}_{\rm AF}={\bf Q}_1=(1,0)$ and its twinned domain ${\bf Q}_2=(0,1)$. For partially detwinned NaFe$_{0.985}$Co$_{0.015}$As with the static AF order mostly occurring at ${\bf Q}_{\rm AF}=(1,0)$, we still find a double resonance at both wave vectors with similar intensity. Since ${\bf Q}_1=(1,0)$ characterizes the explicit breaking of the spin rotational symmetry associated with the AF order, these results indicate that the double resonance cannot be due to the static and fluctuating AF orders, but originate from the superconducting gap anisotropy.
  • An inelastic neutron scattering study of the spin waves corresponding to the stripe antiferromagnetic order in insulating Rb$_{0.8}$Fe$_{1.5}$S$_2$ throughout the Brillouin zone is reported. The spin wave spectra are well described by a Heisenberg Hamiltonian with anisotropic in-plane exchange interactions. Integrating the ordered moment and the spin fluctuations results in a total moment squared of $27.6\pm4.2\mu_B^2$/Fe, consistent with $\mathrm{S \approx 2}$. Unlike $X$Fe$_2$As$_2$ ($X=$ Ca, Sr, and Ba), where the itinerant electrons have a significant contribution, our data suggest that this stripe antiferromagnetically ordered phase in Rb$_{0.8}$Fe$_{1.5}$S$_2$ is a Mott-like insulator with fully localized $3d$ electrons and a high-spin ground state configuration. Nevertheless, the anisotropic exchange couplings appear to be universal in the stripe phase of Fe pnictides and chalcogenides.
  • Electric resistivity, specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, and inelastic neutron scattering experiments were performed on a single crystal of the heavy fermion compound Ce(Ni$_{0.935}$Pd$_{0.065}$)$_2$Ge$_2$ in order to study the spin fluctuations near an antiferromagnetic (AF) quantum critical point (QCP). The resistivity and the specific heat coefficient for $T \leq$ 1 K exhibit the power law behavior expected for a 3D itinerant AF QCP ($\rho(T) \sim T^{3/2}$ and $\gamma(T) \sim \gamma_0 - b T^{1/2}$). However, for 2 $\leq T \leq$ 10 K, the susceptibility and specific heat vary as $log T$ and the resistivity varies linearly with temperature. Furthermore, despite the fact that the resistivity and specific heat exhibit the non-Fermi liquid behavior expected at a QCP, the correlation length, correlation time, and staggered susceptibility of the spin fluctuations remain finite at low temperature. We suggest that these deviations from the divergent behavior expected for a QCP may result from alloy disorder.
  • Itinerant and local moment magnetism have substantively different origins, and require distinct theoretical treatment. A unified theory of magnetism has long been sought after, and remains elusive, mainly due to the limited number of known itinerant magnetic systems. In the case of the two such examples discovered several decades ago, the itinerant ferromagnets ZrZn_2 and Sc_3In, the understanding of their magnetic ground states draws on the existence of 3d electrons subject to strong spin fluctuations. Similarly, in Cr, an elemental itinerant antiferromagnet (IAFM) with a spin density wave (SDW) ground state, its 3d character has been deemed crucial to it being magnetic. Here we report the discovery of the first IAFM compound with no magnetic constituents, TiAu. Antiferromagnetic order occurs below a Neel temperature T_N ~ 36 K, about an order of magnitude smaller than in Cr, rendering the spin fluctuations in TiAu more important at low temperatures. This new IAFM challenges the currently limited understanding of weak itinerant antiferromagnetism, while providing long sought-after insights into the effects of spin fluctuations in itinerant electron systems.
  • Magnetocaloric materials can be useful in magnetic refrigeration applications, but to be practical the magneto-refrigerant needs to have a very large magnetocaloric effect (MCE) near room temperature for modest applied fields (<2 Tesla) with small hysteresis and magnetostriction, and should have a complete magnetic transition, be inexpensive, and environmentally friendly. One system that may fulfill these requirements is MnxFe2-xP1-yGey, where a combined first-order structural and magnetic transition occurs between the high temperature paramagnetic and low temperature ferromagnetic phase. We have used neutron diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and magnetization measurements to study the effects of Mn and Ge location in the structure on the ordered magnetic moment, MCE, and hysteresis for a series of compositions of the system near optimal doping. The diffraction results indicate that the Mn ions located on the 3f site enhance the desirable properties, while those located on the 3g sites are detrimental. The entropy changes measured directly by calorimetry can exceed 40 J/kg-K. The phase fraction that transforms, hysteresis of the transition, and entropy change can be controlled by both the compositional homogeneity and the particle size, and an annealing procedure has been developed that substantially improves the performance of all three properties of the material. On the basis of these results we have identified a pathway to optimize the MCE properties of this system for magnetic refrigeration applications.
  • Neutron diffraction measurements were carried out on single crystals and powders of Yb2Pt2Pb, where Yb moments form planes of orthogonal dimers in the frustrated Shastry-Sutherland Lattice (SSL). Yb2Pt2Pb orders antiferromagnetically at TN=2.07 K, and the magnetic structure determined from these measurements features the interleaving of two orthogonal sublattices into a 5*5*1 magnetic supercell that is based on stripes with moments perpendicular to the dimer bonds, which are along (110) and (-110). Magnetic fields applied along (110) or (-110) suppress the antiferromagnetic peaks from an individual sublattice, but leave the orthogonal sublattice unaffected, evidence for the Ising character of the Yb moments in Yb2Pt2Pb. Specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical resistivity measurements concur with neutron elastic scattering results that the longitudinal critical fluctuations are gapped with E about 0.07 meV.
  • The weakness of electron-electron correlations in the itinerant antiferromagnet Cr doped with V has long been considered the reason that neither new collective electronic states or even non Fermi liquid behaviour are observed when antiferromagnetism in Cr$_{1-x}$V$_{x}$ is suppressed to zero temperature. We present the results of neutron and electron diffraction measurements of several lightly doped single crystals of Cr$_{1-x}$V$_{x}$ in which the archtypal spin density wave instability is progressively suppressed as the V content increases, freeing the nesting-prone Fermi surface for a new striped charge instability that occurs at x$_{c}$=0.037. This novel nesting driven instability relieves the entropy accumulation associated with the suppression of the spin density wave and avoids the formation of a quantum critical point by stabilising a new type of charge order at temperatures in excess of 400 K. Restructuring of the Fermi surface near quantum critical points is a feature found in materials as diverse as heavy fermions, high temperature copper oxide superconductors and now even elemental metals such as Cr.
  • Detailed neutron scattering measurements on the bond frustrated magnet ZnCr2S4 reveal a rich H-T phase diagram. The field dependence of the two subsequent antiferromagnetic transitions follows closely that of recently reported structural instabilities, providing further evidence for spin driven Jahn-Teller physics. The incommensurate helical ordered phase below TN1 = 15.5 K exhibits gapless spin wave excitations, whereas a spin wave gap (about 2 meV) opens below TN2 = 8 K as the system undergoes a first-order transition to a commensurate collinear ordered phase. The spin wave gap is closed by a strong magnetic field.
  • Interest in many strongly spin-orbit coupled 5d-transition metal oxide insulators stems from mapping their electronic structures to a J=1/2 Mott phase. One of the hopes is to establish their Mott parent states and explore these systems' potential of realizing novel electronic states upon carrier doping. However, once doped, little is understood regarding the role of their reduced Coulomb interaction U relative to their strongly correlated 3d-electron cousins. Here we show that, upon hole-doping a candidate J=1/2 Mott insulator, carriers remain localized within a nanoscale phase separated ground state. A percolative metal-insulator transition occurs with interplay between localized and itinerant regions, stabilizing an antiferromagnetic metallic phase beyond the critical region. Our results demonstrate a surprising parallel between doped 5d- and 3d-electron Mott systems and suggest either through the near degeneracy of nearby electronic phases or direct carrier localization that U is essential to the carrier response of this doped spin-orbit Mott insulator.
  • We report results from neutron scattering experiments on single crystals of YbBiPt that demonstrate antiferromagnetic order characterized by a propagation vector, $\tau_{\rm{AFM}}$ = ($\frac{1}{2} \frac{1}{2} \frac{1}{2}$), and ordered moments that align along the [1 1 1] direction of the cubic unit cell. We describe the scattering in terms of a two-Gaussian peak fit, which consists of a narrower component that appears below $T_{\rm{N}}~\approx 0.4$ K and corresponds to a magnetic correlation length of $\xi_{\rm{n}} \approx$ 80 $\rm{\AA}$, and a broad component that persists up to $T^*\approx$ 0.7 K and corresponds to antiferromagnetic correlations extending over $\xi_{\rm{b}} \approx$ 20 $\rm{\AA}$. Our results illustrate the fragile magnetic order present in YbBiPt and provide a path forward for microscopic investigations of the ground states and fluctuations associated with the purported quantum critical point in this heavy-fermion compound.
  • We report the effect of applied pressures on magnetic and superconducting order in single crystals of the aliovalent La-doped iron pnictide material Ca$_{1-x}$La$_{x}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$. Using electrical transport, elastic neutron scattering and resonant tunnel diode oscillator measurements on samples under both quasi-hydrostatic and hydrostatic pressure conditions, we report a series of phase diagrams spanning the range of substitution concentrations for both antiferromagnetic and superconducting ground states that include pressure-tuning through the antiferromagnetic (AFM) quantum critical point. Our results indicate that the observed superconducting phase with maximum transition temperature of $T_{c}$=47 K is intrinsic to these materials, appearing only upon suppression of magnetic order by pressure tuning through the AFM critical point. In contrast to all other intermetallic iron-pnictide superconductors with the ThCr$_2$Si$_2$ structure, this superconducting phase appears to exist only exclusively from the antiferromagnetic phase in a manner similar to the oxygen- and fluorine-based iron-pnictide superconductors with the highest transition temperatures reported to date. The unusual dichotomy between lower-$T_{c}$ systems with coexistent superconductivity and magnetism and the tendency for the highest-$T_{c}$ systems to show non-coexistence provides an important insight into the distinct transition temperature limits in different members of the iron-based superconductor family.
  • A determination of the superconducting (SC) electron pairing symmetry forms the basis for establishing a microscopic mechansim for superconductivity. For iron pnictide superconductors, the $s^\pm$-pairing symmetry theory predicts the presence of a sharp neutron spin resonance at an energy below the sum of hole and electron SC gap energies ($E\leq 2\Delta$) below $T_c$. On the other hand, the $s^{++}$-pairing symmetry expects a broad spin excitation enhancement at an energy above $2\Delta$ below $T_c$. Although the resonance has been observed in iron pnictide superconductors at an energy below $2\Delta$ consistent with the $s^\pm$-pairing symmetry, the mode has also be interpreted as arising from the $s^{++}$-pairing symmetry with $E\ge 2\Delta$ due to its broad energy width and the large uncertainty in determining the SC gaps. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to reveal a sharp resonance at E=7 meV in SC NaFe$_{0.935}$Co$_{0.045}$As ($T_c = 18$ K). On warming towards $T_c$, the mode energy hardly softens while its energy width increases rapidly. By comparing with calculated spin-excitations spectra within the $s^{\pm}$ and $s^{++}$-pairing symmetries, we conclude that the ground-state resonance in NaFe$_{0.935}$Co$_{0.045}$As is only consistent with the $s^{\pm}$-pairing, and is inconsistent with the $s^{++}$-pairing symmetry.
  • Magnetization, nuclear magnetic resonance, high-resolution x-ray diffraction and magnetic field-dependent neutron diffraction measurements reveal a novel magnetic ground state of Ba{0.60}K{0.40}Mn2As2 in which itinerant ferromagnetism (FM) below a Curie temperature TC = 100 K arising from the doped conduction holes coexists with collinear antiferromagnetism (AFM) of the Mn local moments that order below a Neel temperature TN = 480 K. The FM ordered moments are aligned in the tetragonal ab-plane and are orthogonal to the AFM-ordered Mn moments that are aligned along the c-axis. The magnitude and nature of the low-T FM ordered moment correspond to complete polarization of the doped-hole spins (half-metallic itinerant FM) as deduced from magnetization and ab-plane electrical resistivity measurements.
  • Although abundant research has focused recently on the quantum criticality of itinerant magnets, critical phenomena of insulating magnets in the vicinity of critical endpoints (CEP's) have rarely been revealed. Here we observe an emergent CEP at 2.05 T and 2.2 K with a suppressed thermal conductivity and concomitant strong critical fluctuations evident via a divergent magnetic susceptibility (e.g., chi''(2.05 T, 2.2 K)/chi''(3 T, 2.2 K)=23,500 %, comparable to the critical opalescence in water) in the hexagonal insulating antiferromagnet HoMnO3.
  • We present temperature dependent magnetic neutron diffraction measurements on Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$)$_{2}$As$_{2}$ for $x$ = 0.039, 0.022, and 0.021 as-grown single crystals. Our investigations probe the behavior near the magnetic tricritical point in the ($x$,$T$) plane, $x_{tr} \approx $0.022, as well as systematically exploring the character of the magnetic phase transition across a range of doping values. All samples show long range antiferromagnetic order that may be described near the transition by simple power laws, with $\beta$ =~0.306$\pm$0.060 for $x$ =~0.039, $\beta$ =~0.208$\pm$0.005 for $x$ =~0.022, and $\beta$ =~0.198$\pm$0.009 for $x$ =~0.021. For the $x$ =~0.039 sample, the data are reasonably well described by the order parameter exponent $\beta$ =~0.326 expected for a 3D Ising model while the $x$ =~0.022 and $x$ =~0.021 samples are near the $\beta$ =~0.25 value for a tricritical system in the mean-field approximation. These results are discussed in the context of existing experimental work and theoretical predictions.
  • Resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, neutron scattering and x-ray crystallography measurements were used to study the evolution of magnetic order and crystallographic structure in single-crystal samples of the Ba1-xSrxFe2As2 and Sr1-yCayFe2As2 series. A non-monotonic dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature T0 on chemical pressure is compared to the progression of the antiferromagnetic staggered moment, characteristics of the ordering transition and structural parameters to reveal a distinct relationship between the magnetic energy scale and the tetrahedral bond angle, even far above T0. In Sr1-yCayFe2As2, an abrupt drop in T0 precisely at the Ca concentration where the tetrahedral structure approaches the ideal geometry indicates a strong coupling between the orbital bonding structure and the stabilization of magnetic order, providing strong constraints on the nature of magnetism in the iron-arsenide superconducting parent compounds.
  • Quantum-mechanical fluctuations in strongly correlated electron systems cause unconventional phenomena such as non-Fermi liquid behavior, and arguably high temperature superconductivity. Here we report the discovery of a field-tuned quantum critical phenomenon in stoichiometric CeCu2Ge2, a spin density wave ordered heavy fermion metal that exhibits unconventional superconductivity under ~ 10 GPa of applied pressure. Our finding of the associated quantum critical spin fluctuations of the antiferromagnetic spin density wave order, dominating the local fluctuations due to single-site Kondo effect, provide new information about the underlying mechanism that can be important in understanding superconductivity in this novel compound.
  • Aliovalent rare earth substitution into the alkaline earth site of CaFe2As2 single-crystals is used to fine-tune structural, magnetic and electronic properties of this iron-based superconducting system. Neutron and single crystal x-ray scattering experiments indicate that an isostructural collapse of the tetragonal unit cell can be controllably induced at ambient pressures by choice of substituent ion size. This instability is driven by the interlayer As-As anion separation, resulting in an unprecedented thermal expansion coefficient of $180\times 10^{-6}$ K$^{-1}$. Electrical transport and magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal abrupt changes in the physical properties through the collapse as a function of temperature, including a reconstruction of the electronic structure. Superconductivity with onset transition temperatures as high as 47 K is stabilized by the suppression of antiferromagnetic order via chemical pressure, electron doping or a combination of both. Extensive investigations are performed to understand the observations of partial volume-fraction diamagnetic screening, ruling out extrinsic sources such as strain mechanisms, surface states or foreign phases as the cause of this superconducting phase that appears to be stable in both collapsed and uncollapsed structures.