• Semi-inclusive charge-changing neutrino reactions on targets of heavy water are investigated with the goal of determining the relative contributions to the total cross section of deuterium and oxygen in kinematics chosen to emphasize the former. The study is undertaken for conditions where the typical neutrino beam energies are in the few GeV region, and hence relativistic modeling is essential. For this, the previous relativistic approach for the deuteron is employed, together with a spectral function approach for the case of oxygen. Upon optimizing the kinematics of the final-state particles assumed to be detected (typically a muon and a proton) it is shown that the oxygen contribution to the total cross section is suppressed by roughly an order of magnitude compared with the deuterium cross section, thereby confirming that CC$\nu$ studies of heavy water can effectively yield the cross sections for deuterium, with acceptable backgrounds from oxygen. This opens the possibility of using deuterium to determine the incident neutrino flux distribution, to have it serve as a target for which the nuclear structure issues are minimal, and possibly to use deuterium to provide improved knowledge of specific aspects of hadronic structure, such as to explore the momentum transfer dependence of the isovector axial-vector form factor of the nucleon.
  • We discuss the possible factorization of the tensor asymmetry $A^T_d$ measured for polarized deuteron targets within a relativistic framework. We define a reduced asymmetry and find that factorization holds only in plane wave impulse approximation and if p-waves are neglected. Our numerical results show a strong factorization breaking once final state interactions are included. We also compare the d-wave content of the wave functions with the size of the factored, reduced asymmetry and find that there is no systematic relationship of this quantity to the d-wave probability of the various wave functions.
  • Deuteron disintegration by charged-current neutrino (CC$\nu$) scattering offers the possibility to determine the energy of the incident neutrino by measuring in coincidence two of the three resulting particles: a charged lepton (usually a muon) and two protons, where we show that this channel can be isolated from all other, for instance, from those with a pion in the final state. We discuss the kinematics of the process for several detection scenarios, both in terms of kinematic variables that are natural from a theoretical point of view and others that are better matched to experimental situations. The deuteron structure is obtained from a relativistic model (involving an approximation to the Bethe-Salpeter equation) as an extension of a previous, well-tested model used in deuteron electrodisintegration. We provide inclusive and coincidence (semi-inclusive) cross sections for a variety of kinematic conditions, using the plane-wave impulse approximation, introducing final-state hadronic exchange terms (plane-wave Born approximation) and final-state hadronic interactions (distorted-wave Born approximation).
  • Background: A primary goal of deuteron electrodisintegration is the possibility of extracting the deuteron momentum distribution. This extraction is inherently fraught with difficulty, as the momentum distribution is not an observable and the extraction relies on theoretical models dependent on other models as input. Purpose: We present a new method for extracting the momentum distribution which takes into account a wide variety of model inputs thus providing a theoretical uncertainty due to the various model constituents. Method: The calculations presented here are using a Bethe-Salpeter like formalism with a wide variety of bound state wave functions, form factors, and final state interactions. We present a method to extract the momentum distributions from experimental cross sections, which takes into account the theoretical uncertainty from the various model constituents entering the calculation. Results: In order to test the extraction pseudo-data was generated, and the extracted "experimental" distribution, which has theoretical uncertainty from the various model inputs, was compared with the theoretical distribution used to generate the pseudo-data. Conclusions: In the examples we compared, the original distribution was typically within the error band of the extracted distribution. The input wave functions do contain some outliers which are discussed in the text, but at least this procedure can provide an upper bound on the deuteron momentum distribution. Due to the reliance on the theoretical calculation to obtain this quantity any extraction method should account for the theoretical error inherent in these calculations due to model inputs.
  • We propose to measure the D(e,e'p) cross section at $Q^2 = 4.25$ (GeV/c)$^2$ and $x_{bj} = 1.35$ for missing momenta ranging from $p_m = 0.5$ GeV/c to $p_m = 1.0$ GeV/c expanding the range of missing momenta explored in the Hall A experiment (E01-020). At these energy and momentum transfers, calculations based on the eikonal approximation have been shown to be valid and recent experiments indicated that final state interactions are relatively small and possibly independent of missing momenta. This experiment will provide for the first time data in this kinematic regime which are of fundamental importance to the study of short range correlations and high density fluctuations in nuclei. The proposed experiment could serve as a commissioning experiment of the new SHMS together with the HMS in Hall C. A total beam time of 21 days is requested.
  • The general, universal formalism for semi-inclusive charged-current (anti)neutrino-nucleus reactions is given for studies of any hadronic system, namely, either nuclei or the nucleon itself. The detailed developments are presented with the former in mind and are further specialized to cases where the final-state charged lepton and an ejected nucleon are presumed to be detected. General kinematics for such processes are summarized and then explicit expressions are developed for the leptonic and hadronic tensors involved and for the corresponding responses according to the usual charge, longitudinal and transverse projections, keeping finite the masses of all particles involved. In the case of the hadronic responses, general symmetry principles are invoked to determine which contributions can occur. Finally, the general leptonic-hadronic tensor contraction is given as well as the cross section for the process.
  • In this work, an off-shell extrapolation is proposed for the Regge-model $NN$ amplitudes of \cite{FVO_Reggemodel}. A prescription for extrapolating these amplitudes for one nucleon off-shell in the initial state are given. Application of these amplitudes to calculations of deuteron electrodisintegration are presented and compared to the limited available precision data in the kinematical region covered by the Regge model.
  • In previous papers we have presented a calculation describing electrodisintegration of the deuteron at GeV energies. The model is fully relativistic and incorporates full spin dependence of the final state interactions (FSI), which were obtained from the SAID analysis. It was, however, limited kinematically due to lack of availability of the SAID amplitudes. This work rectifies this problem by implementing a Regge model to describe the FSI. We present an outline of the model and show comparisons between the two approaches in a region of overlap. We see good agreement between the models, and note observables which can provide additional insight due to model sensitivity.
  • There are currently no models readily available that provide nucleon-nucleon spin dependent scattering amplitudes at high energies ($s \geq 6$ $ GeV^2$). This work aims to provide a model for calculating these high energy scattering amplitudes. The foundation of the model is Regge theory since it allows for a relativistic description and full spin dependence. We present our parameterization of the amplitudes, and show comparisons of our solutions to the data set we have collected. Overall the model works as intended, and provides an adequate description of the scattering amplitudes.
  • We perform a fully relativistic calculation of the D(e,e'p)n reaction in the impulse approximation. We employ the Gross equation to describe the deuteron ground state, and we use the SAID parametrization of the full NN scattering amplitude to describe the final state interactions (FSIs). We include both on-shell and positive-energy off-shell contributions in our FSI calculation. We show results for momentum distributions and angular distributions of the differential cross section, as well as for various asymmetries. We identify kinematic regions where various parts of the final state interactions are relevant, and discuss the theoretical uncertainties connected with calculations at high missing momenta.
  • A simple model of a relativistic optical model is constructed by reducing the three-body Bethe-Salpeter equation to an effective two-body optical model. A corresponding effective current is derived for use with the optical-model wave functions. It is shown that this current satisfies a Ward-Takahashi identity involving the optical potential which results in conserved current matrix elements.
  • We discuss a new method for obtaining the WKB approximation to the Dirac equation with a scalar potential and a time-like vector potential. We use the WKB solutions to investigate the scaling behavior of a confining model for quark-hadron duality. In this model, a light quark is bound to a heavy di-quark by a linear scalar potential. Absorption of virtual photons promotes the quark to bound states. The analog of the parton model for this case is for a virtual photon to eject the bound, ground-state quark directly into free continuum states. We compare the scaling limits of the response functions for these two transitions.
  • We present a general derivation the three-body spectator (Gross) equations and the corresponding electromagnetic currents. As in previous paper on two-body systems, the wave equations and currents are derived from those for Bethe-Salpeter equation with the help of algebraic method using a concise matrix notation. The three-body interactions and currents introduced by the transition to the spectator approach are isolated and the matrix elements of the e.m. current are presented in detail for system of three indistinguishable particles, namely for elastic scattering and for two and three body break-up. The general expressions are reduced to the one-boson-exchange approximation to make contact with previous work. The method is general in that it does not rely on introduction of the electromagnetic interaction with the help of the minimal replacement. It would therefore work also for other external fields.
  • Using the covariant spectator theory and the transversity formalism, the unpolarized, coincidence cross section for deuteron electrodisintegration, $d(e,e'p)n$, is studied. The relativistic kinematics are reviewed, and simple theoretical formulae for the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA) are derived and discussed. Numerical predictions for the scattering in the high $Q^2$ region obtained from the RIA and five other approximations are presented and compared. We conclude that measurements of the unpolarized coincidence cross section and the asymmetry $A_\phi$, to an accuracy that will distinguish between different theoretical models, is feasible over most of the wide kinematic range accessible at Jefferson Lab.
  • Quark-hadron duality is an interesting and potentially very useful phenomenon, as it relates the properly averaged hadronic data to a perturbative QCD result in some kinematic regions. While duality is well established experimentally, our current theoretical understanding is still incomplete. We employ a simple model to qualitatively reproduce all the features of Bloom-Gilman duality as seen in electron scattering. In particular, we address the role of relativity, give an explicit analytic proof of the equality of the hadronic and partonic scaling curves, and show how the transition from coherent to incoherent scattering takes place.
  • While quark-hadron duality is well-established experimentally, the current theoretical understanding of this important phenomenon is quite limited. To expose the essential features of the dynamics behind duality, we use a simple model in which the hadronic spectrum is dominated by narrow resonances made of valence quarks. We qualitatively reproduce the features of duality as seen in electron scattering data within our model. We show that in order to observe duality, it is essential to use the appropriate scaling variable and scaling function. In addition to its great intrinsic interest in connecting the quark-gluon and hadronic pictures, an understanding of quark-hadron duality could lead to important benefits in extending the applicability of scaling into previously inaccessible regions.
  • We investigate the role of correlated $\pi\rho$ exchange in the extraction of matrix elements of the strange vector current in the proton. We show that a realistic isoscalar spectral function including this effect leads to sizeably reduced strange vector form factors based on the dispersion--theoretical analysis of the nucleons' electromagnetic form factors.
  • Motivated by the present interest in the heavy quark effective theory, we use the spectator equation to treat the mesonic bound states of heavy quarks. The kernel we use is based on scalar confining and vector Coulomb potentials. Wave functions are treated to leading order and energies to order $1/m_Q$ in the heavy-light systems, and order $1/m_Q^2$ in heavy-heavy systems. Our results are in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements. We estimate two of the parameters of the heavy quark effective theory, and propose further calculations that may be undertaken in the future.