• JWST was conceived and built to answer one of the most fundamental questions that humans can address empirically: "How did the Universe make its first stars?". Our First Lights At REionization (FLARE) project transforms the quest for the epoch of reionization from the static to the time domain. It targets the complementary question: "What happened to those first stars?". It will be answered by observations of the most luminous events: supernovae and accretion on to black holes formed by direct collapse from the primordial gas clouds. These transients provide direct constraints on star-formation rates (SFRs) and the truly initial Initial Mass Function (IMF), and they may identify possible stellar seeds of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Furthermore, our knowledge of the physics of these events at ultra-low metallicity will be much expanded. JWST's unique capabilities will detect these most luminous and earliest cosmic messengers easily in fairly shallow observations. However, these events are very rare at the dawn of cosmic structure formation and so require large area coverage. Time domain astronomy can be advanced to an unprecedented depth by means of a shallow field of JWST reaching 27 mag AB in 2 and 4.4 microns over a field as large as 0.1 square degree visited multiple times each year. Such a survey may set strong constraints or detect massive Pop III SNe at redshifts beyond 10, pinpointing the redshift of the first stars, or at least their death. Based on our current knowledge of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), such a survey will find one or more SLSNe at redshifts above 6 in five years and possibly several direct collapse black holes. Although JWST is not designed as a wide field survey telescope, we show that such a wide field survey is possible with JWST and is critical in addressing several of its key scientific goals.
  • The low-lying energy levels of proton-rich $^{56}$Cu have been extracted using in-beam $\gamma$-ray spectroscopy with the state-of-the-art $\gamma$-ray tracking array GRETINA in conjunction with the S800 spectrograph at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. Excited states in $^{56}$Cu serve as resonances in the $^{55}$Ni(p,$\gamma$)$^{56}$Cu reaction, which is a part of the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts. To resolve existing ambiguities in the reaction Q-value, a more localized IMME mass fit is used resulting in $Q=639\pm82$~keV. We derive the first experimentally-constrained thermonuclear reaction rate for $^{55}$Ni(p,$\gamma$)$^{56}$Cu. We find that, with this new rate, the rp-process may bypass the $^{56}$Ni waiting point via the $^{55}$Ni(p,$\gamma$) reaction for typical x-ray burst conditions with a branching of up to $\sim$40$\%$. We also identify additional nuclear physics uncertainties that need to be addressed before drawing final conclusions about the rp-process reaction flow in the $^{56}$Ni region.
  • Selecting sources with rising flux densities towards longer wavelengths from Herschel/SPIRE maps is an efficient way to produce a catalogue rich in high-redshift (z > 4) dusty star-forming galaxies. The effectiveness of this approach has already been confirmed by spectroscopic follow-up observations, but the previously available catalogues made this way are limited by small survey areas. Here we apply a map-based search method to 274 deg$^2$ of the HerMES Large Mode Survey (HeLMS) and create a catalogue of 477 objects with SPIRE flux densities $S_{500} > S_{350} >S_{250}$ and a $5 \sigma$ cut-off $S_{500} > $ 52 mJy. From this catalogue we determine that the total number of these "red" sources is at least an order of magnitude higher than predicted by galaxy evolution models. These results are in agreement with previous findings in smaller HerMES fields; however, due to our significantly larger sample size we are also able to investigate the shape of the red source counts for the first time. We have obtained spectroscopic redshift measurements for two of our sources using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The redshifts z = 5.1 and z = 3.8 confirm that with our selection method we can indeed find high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies.
  • SuperSpec is a novel on-chip spectrometer we are developing for multi-object, moderate resolution (R = 100 - 500), large bandwidth (~1.65:1) submillimeter and millimeter survey spectroscopy of high-redshift galaxies. The spectrometer employs a filter bank architecture, and consists of a series of half-wave resonators formed by lithographically-patterned superconducting transmission lines. The signal power admitted by each resonator is detected by a lumped element titanium nitride (TiN) kinetic inductance detector (KID) operating at 100 - 200 MHz. We have tested a new prototype device that achieves the targeted R = 100 resolving power, and has better detector sensitivity and optical efficiency than previous devices. We employ a new method for measuring photon noise using both coherent and thermal sources of radiation to cleanly separate the contributions of shot and wave noise. We report an upper limit to the detector NEP of $1.4\times10^{-17}$ W Hz$^{-1/2}$, within 10% of the photon noise limited NEP for a ground-based R=100 spectrometer.
  • High harmonic generation (HHG) is used to measure the spectral phase of the recombination dipole matrix element (RDM) in argon over a broad frequency range that includes the 3p Cooper minimum (CM). The measured RDM phase agrees well with predictions based on the scattering phases and amplitudes of the interfering s- and d-channel contributions to the complementary photoionization process. The reconstructed attosecond bursts that underlie the HHG process show that the derivative of the RDM spectral phase, the group delay, does not have a straight-forward interpretation as an emission time, in contrast to the usual attochirp group delay. Instead, the rapid RDM phase variation caused by the CM reshapes the attosecond bursts.
  • Synthetic spectra generated with the parameterized supernova synthetic-spectrum code SYNOW are compared to observed photospheric-phase spectra of the Type Ic supernova 1994I. The observed optical spectra can be well matched by synthetic spectra that are based on the assumption of spherical symmetry. We consider the identification of the infrared absorption feature observed near 10,250 \AA, which previously has been attributed to He I $\lambda10830$ and regarded as strong evidence that SN 1994I ejected some helium. We have difficulty accounting for the infrared absorption with He I alone. It could be a blend of He I and C I lines. Alternatively, we find that it can be fit by Si I lines without compromising the fit in the optical region. In synthetic spectra that match the observed spectra, from 4 days before to 26 days after the time of maximum brightness, the adopted velocity at the photosphere decreases from 17,500 to 7000 \kms. Simple estimates of the kinetic energy carried by the ejected mass give values that are near the canonical supernova energy of $10^{51}$ ergs. The velocities and kinetic energies that we find for SN 1994I in this way are much lower than those that we find elsewhere for the peculiar Type Ic SNe 1997ef and 1998bw, which therefore appear to have been hyper-energetic.