• A system of interacting dipoles is of paramount importance for understanding of many-body physics. The interaction between dipoles is {\it anisotropic} and {\it long-range}. While the former allows to observe rich effects due to different geometries of the system, long-range ($1/r^3$) interactions lead to strong correlations between dipoles and frustration. In effect, interacting dipoles in a lattice form a paradigmatic system with strong correlations and exotic properties with possible applications in quantum information technologies, and as quantum simulators of condensed matter physics, material science, etc. Notably, such a system is extremely difficult to model due to a proliferation of interaction induced multi-band excitations for sufficiently strong dipole-dipole interactions. In this article we develop a consistent theoretical model of interacting polar molecules in a lattice by applying the concepts and ideas of ionization theory which allows us to include highly excited Bloch bands. Additionally, by involving concepts from quantum optics (population trapping), we show that one can induce frustration and engineer exotic states, such as Majumdar-Ghosh state, or vector-chiral states in such a system.
  • We study a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian of ultracold two component gas of spinor Chromium atoms. Dipolar interactions of magnetic moments while tuned resonantly by ultralow magnetic field can lead to spin flipping. Due to approximate axial symmetry of individual lattice site, total angular momentum is conserved. Therefore, all changes of the spin are accompanied by the appearance of the angular orbital momentum. This way excited Wannier states with non vanishing angular orbital momentum can be created. Resonant dipolar coupling of the two component Bose gas introduces additional degree of control of the system, and leads to a variety of different stable phases. The phase diagram for small number of particles is discussed.
  • Using Fourier transform on a time series generated by unitary evolution, we extract many-body eigenstates of the Bose-Hubbard model corresponding to low energy excitations, which are generated when the insulator-superfluid phase transition is realized in a typical experiment. The analysis is conducted in a symmetric external potential both without and with and disorder. A simple classification of excitations in the absence disorder is provided. The evolution is performed assuming the presence of the parity symmetry in the system rendering many-body quantum states either symmetric or antisymmetric. Using symmetry-breaking technique, those states are decomposed into elementary one-particle processes.
  • At very low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with attractive interactions tend to form a bright soliton. When exposed to a sufficiently weak external potential, the shape of the soliton is not modified, but its external motion is affected. We develop in detail the Bogoliubov approach for the problem, treating, in a non-perturbative way, the motion of the center of mass of the soliton. Quantization of this motion allows us to discuss its long time properties. In particular, in the presence of a disordered potential, the quantum motion of the center of mass of a bright soliton may exhibit Anderson localization, on a localization length which may be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.
  • Disorder plays a crucial role in many systems particularly in solid state physics. However, the disorder in a particular system can usually not be chosen or controlled. We show that the unique control available for ultracold atomic gases may be used for the production and observation of disordered quantum degenerate gases. A detailed analysis of localization effects for two possible realizations of a disordered potential is presented. In a theoretical analysis clear localization effects are observed when a superlattice is used to provide a quasiperiodic disorder. The effects of localization are analyzed by investigating the superfluid fraction and the localization length within the system. The theoretical analysis in this paper paves a clear path for the future observation of Anderson-like localization in disordered quantum gases.
  • We investigate, both experimentally and theoretically, possible routes towards Anderson-like localization of Bose-Einstein condensates in disordered potentials. The dependence of this quantum interference effect on the nonlinear interactions and the shape of the disorder potential is investigated. Experiments with an optical lattice and a superimposed disordered potential reveal the lack of Anderson localization. A theoretical analysis shows that this absence is due to the large length scale of the disorder potential as well as its screening by the nonlinear interactions. Further analysis shows that incommensurable superlattices should allow for the observation of the cross-over from the nonlinear screening regime to the Anderson localized case within realistic experimental parameters.
  • We relate the Fermi-Dirac statistics of an ideal Fermi gas in a harmonic trap to partitions of given integers into distinct parts, studied in number theory. Using methods of quantum statistical physics we derive analytic expressions for cumulants of the probability distribution of the number of different partitions.
  • An ultra cold atomic Bose gas in an optical lattice is shown to provide an ideal system for the controlled analysis of disordered Bose lattice gases. This goal may be easily achieved under the current experimental conditions, by introducing a pseudo-random potential created by a second additional lattice or, alternatively, by placing a speckle pattern on the main lattice. We show that for a non commensurable filling factor, in the strong interaction limit, a controlled growing of the disorder drives a dynamical transition from superfluid to Bose-glass phase. Similarly, in the weak interaction limit, a dynamical transition from superfluid to Anderson-glass phase may be observed. In both regimes, we show that even very low-intensity disorder-inducing lasers cause large modifications of the superfluid fraction of the system.