• Gaia Data Release 2 (Gaia DR2) contains results for 1693 million sources in the magnitude range 3 to 21 based on observations collected by the European Space Agency Gaia satellite during the first 22 months of its operational phase. We describe the input data, models, and processing used for the astrometric content of Gaia DR2, and the validation of these results performed within the astrometry task. Some 320 billion centroid positions from the pre-processed astrometric CCD observations were used to estimate the five astrometric parameters (positions, parallaxes, and proper motions) for 1332 million sources, and approximate positions at the reference epoch J2015.5 for an additional 361 million mostly faint sources. Special validation solutions were used to characterise the random and systematic errors in parallax and proper motion. For the sources with five-parameter astrometric solutions, the median uncertainty in parallax and position at the reference epoch J2015.5 is about 0.04 mas for bright (G<14 mag) sources, 0.1 mas at G=17 mag, and 0.7 mas at G=20 mag. In the proper motion components the corresponding uncertainties are 0.05, 0.2, and 1.2 mas/yr, respectively. The optical reference frame defined by Gaia DR2 is aligned with ICRS and is non-rotating with respect to the quasars to within 0.15 mas/yr. From the quasars and validation solutions we estimate that systematics in the parallaxes depending on position, magnitude, and colour are generally below 0.1 mas, but the parallaxes are on the whole too small by about 0.03 mas. Significant spatial correlations of up to 0.04 mas in parallax and 0.07 mas/yr in proper motion are seen on small (<1 deg) and intermediate (20 deg) angular scales. Important statistics and information for the users of the Gaia DR2 astrometry are given in the appendices.
  • The second Gaia data release (GDR2) provides precise five-parameter astrometric data (positions, proper motions and parallaxes) for an unprecedented amount of sources (more than $1.3$ billion, mostly stars). The use of this wealth of astrometric data comes with a specific challenge: how does one properly infer from these data the astrophysical parameters of interest? The main - but not only - focus of this paper is the issue of the estimation of distances from parallaxes, possibly combined with other information. We start with a critical review of the methods traditionally used to obtain distances from parallaxes and their shortcomings. Then we provide guidelines on how to use parallaxes more efficiently to estimate distances by using Bayesian methods. In particular also we show that negative parallaxes, or parallaxes with relatively larger uncertainties still contain valuable information. Finally, we provide examples that show more generally how to use astrometric data for parameter estimation, including the combination of proper motions and parallaxes and the handling of covariances in the uncertainties. The paper contains examples based on simulated Gaia data to illustrate the problems and the solutions proposed. Furthermore, the developments and methods proposed in the paper are linked to a set of tutorials included in the Gaia archive documentation that provide practical examples and a good starting point for the application of the recommendations to actual problems. In all cases the source code for the analysis methods is provided. Our main recommendation is to always treat the derivation of (astro-) physical parameters from astrometric data, in particular when parallaxes are involved, as an inference problem which should preferably be handled with a full Bayesian approach.
  • We use the Gaia-TGAS data to compare the transverse velocities in Galactic longitude (coming from proper motions and parallaxes) in the Milky Way disk for negative and positive longitudes as a function of distance. The transverse velocities are strongly asymmetric and deviate significantly from the expectations for an axisymmetric Galaxy. The value and sign of the asymmetry changes at spatial scales of several tens of degrees in Galactic longitude and about 0.5 kpc in distance. The asymmetry is statistically significant at 95% confidence level for 57% of the region probed, which extends up to ~1.2 kpc. A percentage of 24% of the region studied shows absolute differences at this confidence level larger than 5 km/s and 7% larger than 10 km/s. The asymmetry pattern shows mild variations in the vertical direction and with stellar type. A first qualitative comparison with spiral arm models indicates that the arms are unlikely to be the main source of the asymmetry. We briefly discuss alternative origins. This is the first time that global all-sky asymmetries are detected in the Milky Way kinematics, beyond the local neighbourhood, and with a purely astrometric sample.
  • Gaia Data Release 1 (Gaia DR1) contains astrometric results for more than 1 billion stars brighter than magnitude 20.7 based on observations collected by the Gaia satellite during the first 14 months of its operational phase. We give a brief overview of the astrometric content of the data release and of the model assumptions, data processing, and validation of the results. For stars in common with the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues, complete astrometric single-star solutions are obtained by incorporating positional information from the earlier catalogues. For other stars only their positions are obtained by neglecting their proper motions and parallaxes. The results are validated by an analysis of the residuals, through special validation runs, and by comparison with external data. Results. For about two million of the brighter stars (down to magnitude ~11.5) we obtain positions, parallaxes, and proper motions to Hipparcos-type precision or better. For these stars, systematic errors depending e.g. on position and colour are at a level of 0.3 milliarcsecond (mas). For the remaining stars we obtain positions at epoch J2015.0 accurate to ~10 mas. Positions and proper motions are given in a reference frame that is aligned with the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to better than 0.1 mas at epoch J2015.0, and non-rotating with respect to ICRF to within 0.03 mas/yr. The Hipparcos reference frame is found to rotate with respect to the Gaia DR1 frame at a rate of 0.24 mas/yr. Based on less than a quarter of the nominal mission length and on very provisional and incomplete calibrations, the quality and completeness of the astrometric data in Gaia DR1 are far from what is expected for the final mission products. The results nevertheless represent a huge improvement in the available fundamental stellar data and practical definition of the optical reference frame.
  • We model the effects of the spiral arms of the Milky Way on the disk stellar kinematics in the Gaia observable space. We also estimate the Gaia capabilities of detecting the predicted signatures. We use both controlled orbital integrations in analytic potentials and self-consistent simulations. We introduce a new strategy, which consists of comparing the stellar kinematics of symmetric Galactic longitudes (+l and -l), in particular the median transverse velocity (from parallaxes and proper motions). This approach does not require the assumption of an axisymmetric model. The typical differences between the transverse velocity in symmetric longitudes in the models are of ~2 km/s, but can be larger than 10 km/s for certain longitudes and distances. The kinematic differences for +l and -l show trends that depend on the properties of spiral arms. Thus, this method can be used to quantify the importance of the effects of spiral arms on the orbits of stars in the different disk regions, and to constrain the location of the arms, main resonances and, thus, pattern speed. Moreover, the method allows us to test the dynamical nature of the spiral structure (e.g. grand design versus transient multiple arms). We estimate the number of stars of each spectral type that Gaia will observe in representative Galactic longitudes, their errors in distance and transverse velocity, and the error in computing the median velocity as a function of distance. We will be able to measure the median transverse velocity with Gaia data, with precision smaller than ~1 km/s up to distances of ~4-6 kpc for certain giant stars, and up to ~2-4 kpc and better kinematic precision (<= 0.5 km\s) for certain sub-giants and dwarfs. These are enough to measure the typical signatures seen in the models. We also show that a similar strategy can be used with line-of-sight velocities from other upcoming spectroscopic surveys.(Abridged)
  • Aims: An effort has been undertaken to simulate the expected Gaia Catalogue, including the effect of observational errors. A statistical analysis of this simulated Gaia data is performed in order to better understand what can be obtained from the Gaia astrometric mission. This catalogue is used in order to investigate the potential yield in astrometric, photometric and spectroscopic information, and the extent and effect of observational errors on the true Gaia Catalogue. This article is a follow-up to Robin et. al. (2012), where the expected Gaia Catalogue content was reviewed but without the simulation of observational errors. Methods: The Gaia Object Generator (GOG) catalogue is analysed using the Gaia Analysis Tool (GAT), producing a number of statistics on the catalogue. Results: A simulated catalogue of one billion objects is presented, with detailed information on the 523 million individual single stars it contains. Detailed information is provided for the expected errors in parallax, position, proper motion, radial velocity, photometry in the four Gaia bands, and physical parameter determination including temperature, metallicity and line of sight extinction.
  • The scientific community needs to be prepared to analyse the data from Gaia, one of the most ambitious ESA space missions, to be launched in 2012. The purpose of this paper is to provide data and tools in order to predict in advance how Gaia photometry is expected to be. To do so, we provide relationships among colours involving Gaia magnitudes and colours from other commonly used photometric systems (Johnson-Cousins, SDSS, Hipparcos and Tycho). The most up-to-date information from industrial partners has been used to define the nominal passbands and based on the BaSeL3.1 stellar spectral energy distribution library, relationships were obtained for stars with different reddening values, ranges of temperatures, surface gravities and metallicities. The transformations involving Gaia and Johnson-Cousins V-I_C and Sloan DSS g-z colours have the lowest residuals. A polynomial expression for the relation between the effective temperature and the colour G_BP-G_RP was derived for stars with T > 4500 K. Transformations involving two Johnson or two Sloan DSS colours yield lower residuals than using only one colour. We also computed several ratios of total-to-selective absorption including absorption A_G in the G band and colour excess E(G_BP-G_RP) for our sample stars. A relationship, involving A_G/A_V and the intrinsic (V-I_C) colour, is provided. The derived Gaia passbands have been used to compute tracks and isochrones using the Padova and BASTI models. Finally, the performances of the predicted Gaia magnitudes have been estimated according to the magnitude and the celestial coordinates of the star. The provided dependencies among colours can be used for planning scientific exploitation of Gaia data, performing simulations of the Gaia-like sky, planning ground-based complementary observations and for building catalogues with auxiliary data for the Gaia data processing and validation.