• The chemical yields of supernovae and the metal enrichment of the hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) are not well understood. This paper introduces the CHEmical Enrichment RGS Sample (CHEERS), which is a sample of 44 bright local giant ellipticals, groups and clusters of galaxies observed with XMM-Newton. This paper focuses on the abundance measurements of O and Fe using the reflection grating spectrometer (RGS). The deep exposures and the size of the sample allow us to quantify the intrinsic scatter and the systematic uncertainties in the abundances using spectral modeling techniques. We report the oxygen and iron abundances as measured with RGS in the core regions of all objects in the sample. We do not find a significant trend of O/Fe as a function of cluster temperature, but we do find an intrinsic scatter in the O and Fe abundances from cluster to cluster. The level of systematic uncertainties in the O/Fe ratio is estimated to be around 20-30%, while the systematic uncertainties in the absolute O and Fe abundances can be as high as 50% in extreme cases. We were able to identify and correct a systematic bias in the oxygen abundance determination, which was due to an inaccuracy in the spectral model. The lack of dependence of O/Fe on temperature suggests that the enrichment of the ICM does not depend on cluster mass and that most of the enrichment likely took place before the ICM was formed. We find that the observed scatter in the O/Fe ratio is due to a combination of intrinsic scatter in the source and systematic uncertainties in the spectral fitting, which we are unable to disentangle. The astrophysical source of intrinsic scatter could be due to differences in AGN activity and ongoing star formation in the BCG. The systematic scatter is due to uncertainties in the spatial line broadening, absorption column, multi-temperature structure and the thermal plasma models. (Abbreviated).
  • We present some recent highlights and prospects for the study of hot astrophysical plasmas. Hot plasmas can be studied primarily through their X-ray emission and absorption. Most astrophysical objects, from solar system objects to the largest scale structures of the Universe, contain hot gas. In general we can distinguish collisionally ionised gas and photoionised gas. We introduce several examples of both classes and show where the frontiers of this research in astrophysics can be found. We put this also in the context of the current and future generation of X-ray spectroscopy satellites. The data coming from these missions challenge the models that we have for the calculation of the X-ray spectra.
  • The CHEERS (CHEmical Enrichment RGS Sample) observations of clusters of galaxies with XMM-Newton have shown to be valuable to constrain the chemical evolution of the universe. The soft X-ray spectrum contains lines of the most abundant metals from N to Ni, which provide relatively accurate abundances that can be compared to supernova enrichment models. The accuracy of the abundances is currently limited by systematic uncertainties introduced by the available instruments and uncertainties in the modeling of the spectra, which are of the order of 20-30%. We discuss the possible gain of extending the current samples at low and high redshift. We conclude that expanding the samples would be expensive in terms of exposure time, but will not yield significantly improved results, because the current samples already reach the systematic limits. New instrumentation, like Astro-H2 and ATHENA, and improvements to the atomic databases are needed to make significant advances in this field.
  • Clusters of galaxies are the largest gravitationally bounded structures in the Universe dominated by dark matter. We review the observational appearance and physical models of plasma structures in clusters of galaxies. Bubbles of relativistic plasma which are inflated by supermassive black holes of AGNs, cooling and heating of the gas, large scale plasma shocks, cold fronts, non-thermal halos and relics are observed in clusters. These constituents are reflecting both the formation history and the dynamical properties of clusters of galaxies. We discuss X-ray spectroscopy as a tool to study the metal enrichment in clusters and fine spectroscopy of Fe X-ray lines as a powerful diagnostics of both the turbulent plasma motions and the energetics of the non-thermal electron populations. The knowledge of the complex dynamical and feedback processes is necessary to understand the energy and matter balance as well as to constrain the role of the non-thermal components of clusters.
  • The Athena+ mission concept is designed to implement the Hot and Energetic Universe science theme submitted to the European Space Agency in response to the call for White Papers for the definition of the L2 and L3 missions of its science program. The Athena+ science payload consists of a large aperture high angular resolution X-ray optics and twelve meters away, two interchangeable focal plane instruments: the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) and the Wide Field Imager (WFI). The X-IFU is a cryogenic X-ray spectrometer, based on a large array of Transition Edge Sensors (TES), offering 2.5 eV spectral resolution, with ~5" pixels, over a field of view of 5 arc minutes in diameter. In this paper, we briefly describe the Athena+ mission concept and the X-IFU performance requirements. We then present the X-IFU detector and readout electronics principles, the current design of the focal plane assembly, the cooling chain and review the global architecture design. Finally, we describe the current performance estimates, in terms of effective area, particle background rejection, count rate capability and velocity measurements. Finally, we emphasize on the latest technology developments concerning TES array fabrication, spectral resolution and readout performance achieved to show that significant progresses are being accomplished towards the demanding X-IFU requirements.
  • Major astrophysical questions related to the formation and evolution of structures, and more specifically of galaxy groups and clusters, will still be open in the coming decade and beyond: what is the interplay of galaxy, supermassive black hole, and intergalactic gas evolution in the most massive objects in the Universe - galaxy groups and clusters? What are the processes driving the evolution of chemical enrichment of the hot diffuse gas in large-scale structures? How and when did the first galaxy groups in the Universe, massive enough to bind more than 10^7 K gas, form? Focussing on the period when groups and clusters assembled (0.5<z<2.5), we show that, due to the continuum and line emission of this hot intergalactic gas at X-ray wavelengths, Athena+, combining high sensitivity with excellent spectral and spatial resolution, will deliver breakthrough observations in view of the aforementioned issues. Indeed, the physical and chemical properties of the hot intra-cluster gas, and their evolution across time, are a key to understand the co-evolution of galaxy and supermassive black hole within their environments.
  • As the nodes of the cosmic web, clusters of galaxies trace the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe. They are thus privileged sites in which to investigate the complex physics of structure formation. However, the complete story of how these structures grow, and how they dissipate the gravitational and non-thermal components of their energy budget over cosmic time, is still beyond our grasp. Fundamental questions such as How do hot diffuse baryons accrete and dynamically evolve in dark matter potentials? How and when was the energy that we observe in the ICM generated and distributed? Where and when are heavy elements produced and how are they circulated? are still unanswered. Most of the cluster baryons exists in the form of a diffuse, hot, metal-enriched plasma that radiates primarily in the X-ray band (the intracluster medium, ICM), allowing the X-ray observations of the evolving cluster population to provide a unique opportunity to address these topics. Athena+ with its large collecting area and unprecedented combination of high spectral and angular resolution offers the only way to make major advances in answering these questions. Athena+ will show how the baryonic gas evolves in the dark matter potential wells by studying the motions and turbulence in the ICM. Athena+ will be able to resolve the accreting region both spatially and spectroscopically, probing the true nature and physical state of the X-ray emitting plasma. Athena+ has the capabilities to permit a definitive understanding of the formation and evolution of large-scale cosmic structure through the study of the cluster population.
  • Metals play a fundamental role in ICM cooling processes in cluster cores through the emission of spectral lines. But when and how were these metals formed and distributed through the ICM? The X-ray band has the unique property of containing emission lines from all elements from carbon to zinc within the 0.1-10 keV band. Using XMM-Newton, the abundances of about 11 elements are studied, which contain valuable information about their origin. Most elements were formed in type Ia and core-collapse supernovae, which have very different chemical yields. Massive stars and AGB stars also contribute by providing most of the carbon and nitrogen in the ICM. Because feedback processes suppress star formation in the cluster centre, the element abundances allow us to directly probe the star formation history of the majority of stars that are thought to have formed between z=2-3. The spatial distribution in the core and the evolution with redshift also provide information about how these elements are transported from the member galaxies to the ICM. I review the current progress in chemical enrichment studies of the ICM and give an outlook to the future opportunities provided by XMM-Newton's successors, like Astro-H.
  • The interstellar and intra-cluster medium in giant elliptical galaxies and clusters of galaxies is often assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium. Numerical simulations, however, show that about 5-30% of the pressure in a cluster is provided by turbulence induced by, for example, the central AGN and merger activity. We aim to put constraints on the turbulent velocities and turbulent pressure in the ICM of the giant elliptical galaxies NGC 5044 and NGC 5813 using XMM-Newton RGS observations. The magnitude of the turbulence is estimated using the Fe XVII lines at 15.01 A, 17.05 A, and 17.10 A in the RGS spectra. At low turbulent velocities, the gas becomes optically thick in the 15.01 A line due to resonant scattering, while the 17 A lines remain optically thin. By comparing the (I(17.05)+I(17.10))/I(15.01) line ratio from RGS with simulated line ratios for different Mach numbers, the level of turbulence is constrained. The measurement is limited by systematic uncertainties in the atomic data, which are at the 20-30% level. We find that the line ratio in NGC 5813 is significantly higher than in NGC 5044. This difference can be explained by a higher level of turbulence in NGC 5044. The high turbulent velocities and the fraction of the turbulent pressure support of >40% in NGC 5044, assuming isotropic turbulence, confirm that it is a highly disturbed system, probably due to an off-axis merger. The turbulent pressure support in NGC 5813 is more modest at 15-45%. The (I(17.05)+I(17.10))/I(15.01) line ratio in an optically thin plasma, calculated using AtomDB v2.0.1, is 2 sigma above the ratio measured in NGC 5044, which cannot be explained by resonant scattering. This shows that the discrepancies between theoretical, laboratory, and astrophysical data on Fe XVII lines need to be reduced to improve the accuracy of the determination of turbulent velocities using resonant scattering.
  • We observed the northwest region of the cluster of galaxies A3667 with the Suzaku XIS instrument. The temperature and surface brightness of the intracluster medium were measured up to the virial radius (r200-2.3 Mpc). The radial temperature profile is flatter than the average profile for other clusters until the radius reaches the northwest radio relic. The temperature drops sharply from 5 keV to about 2 keV at the northwest radio relic region. The sharp changes of the temperature can be interpreted as a shock with a Mach number of about 2.5. The entropy slope becomes flatter in the outer region and negative around the radio relic region. In this region, the relaxation timescale of electron-ion Coulomb collisions is longer than the time elapsed after the shock heating and the plasma may be out of equilibrium. Using differential emission measure (DEM) models, we also confirm the multi-temperature structure around the radio relic region, characterized by two peaks at 1 keV and 4 keV. These features suggest that the gas is heated by a shock propagating from the center to outer region.
  • J.W. den Herder, L. Piro, T. Ohashi, C. Kouveliotou, D.H. Hartmann, J.S. Kaastra, L. Amati, M.I. Andersen, M. Arnaud, J-L. Attéia, S. Bandler, M. Barbera, X. Barcons, S. Barthelmy, S. Basa, S. Basso, M. Boer, E. Branchini, G. Branduardi-Raymont, S. Borgani, A. Boyarsky, G. Brunetti, C. Budtz-Jorgensen, D. Burrows, N. Butler, S. Campana, E. Caroli, M. Ceballos, F. Christensen, E. Churazov, A. Comastri, L. Colasanti, R. Cole, R. Content, A. Corsi, E. Costantini, P. Conconi, G. Cusumano, J. de Plaa, A. De Rosa, M. Del Santo, S. Di Cosimo, M. De Pasquale, R. Doriese, S. Ettori, P. Evans, Y. Ezoe, L. Ferrari, H. Finger, T. Figueroa-Feliciano, P. Friedrich, R. Fujimoto, A. Furuzawa, J. Fynbo, F. Gatti, M. Galeazzi, N. Gehrels, B. Gendre, G. Ghirlanda, G. Ghisellini, M. Gilfanov, P. Giommi, M. Girardi, J. Grindlay, M. Cocchi, O. Godet, M. Guedel, F. Haardt, R. den Hartog, I. Hepburn, W. Hermsen, J. Hjorth, H. Hoekstra, A. Holland, A. Hornstrup, A. van der Horst, A. Hoshino, J. in 't Zand, K. Irwin, Y. Ishisaki, P. Jonker, T. Kitayama, H. Kawahara, N. Kawai, R. Kelley, C. Kilbourne, P. de Korte, A. Kusenko, I. Kuvvetli, M. Labanti, C. Macculi, R. Maiolino, M. Mas Hesse, K. Matsushita, P. Mazzotta, D. McCammon, M. Méndez, R. Mignani, T. Mineo, K. Mitsuda, R. Mushotzky, S. Molendi, L. Moscardini, L. Natalucci, F. Nicastro, P. O'Brien, J. Osborne, F. Paerels, M. Page, S. Paltani, K. Pedersen, E. Perinati, T. Ponman, E. Pointecouteau, P. Predehl, S. Porter, A. Rasmussen, G. Rauw, H. Röttgering, M. Roncarelli, P. Rosati, E. Quadrini, O. Ruchayskiy, R. Salvaterra, S. Sasaki, K. Sato, S. Savaglio, J. Schaye, S. Sciortino, M. Shaposhnikov, R. Sharples, K. Shinozaki, D. Spiga, R. Sunyaev, Y. Suto, Y. Takei, N. Tanvir, M. Tashiro, T. Tamura, Y. Tawara, E. Troja, M. Tsujimoto, T. Tsuru, P. Ubertini, J. Ullom, E. Ursino, F. Verbunt, F. van de Voort, M. Viel, S. Wachter, D. Watson, M. Weisskopf, N. Werner, N. White, R. Willingale, R. Wijers, N. Yamasaki, K. Yoshikawa, S. Zane
    ORIGIN is a proposal for the M3 mission call of ESA aimed at the study of metal creation from the epoch of cosmic dawn. Using high-spectral resolution in the soft X-ray band, ORIGIN will be able to identify the physical conditions of all abundant elements between C and Ni to red-shifts of z=10, and beyond. The mission will answer questions such as: When were the first metals created? How does the cosmic metal content evolve? Where do most of the metals reside in the Universe? What is the role of metals in structure formation and evolution? To reach out to the early Universe ORIGIN will use Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) to study their local environments in their host galaxies. This requires the capability to slew the satellite in less than a minute to the GRB location. By studying the chemical composition and properties of clusters of galaxies we can extend the range of exploration to lower redshifts (z ~ 0.2). For this task we need a high-resolution spectral imaging instrument with a large field of view. Using the same instrument, we can also study the so far only partially detected baryons in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). The less dense part of the WHIM will be studied using absorption lines at low redshift in the spectra for GRBs.
  • The physics of the coolest phases in the hot Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) of clusters of galaxies is yet to be fully unveiled. X-ray cavities blown by the central Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) contain enough energy to heat the surrounding gas and stop cooling, but locally blobs or filaments of gas appear to be able to cool to low temperatures of 10^4 K. In X-rays, however, gas with temperatures lower than 0.5 keV is not observed. Using a deep XMM-Newton observation of the cluster of galaxies Abell 2052, we derive 2D maps of the temperature, entropy, and iron abundance in the core region. About 130 kpc South-West of the central galaxy, we discover a discontinuity in the surface brightness of the hot gas which is consistent with a cold front. Interestingly, the iron abundance jumps from ~0.75 to ~0.5 across the front. In a smaller region to the North-West of the central galaxy we find a relatively high contribution of cool 0.5 keV gas, but no X-ray emitting gas is detected below that temperature. However, the region appears to be associated with much cooler H-alpha filaments in the optical waveband. The elliptical shape of the cold front in the SW of the cluster suggests that the front is caused by sloshing of the hot gas in the clusters gravitational potential. This effect is probably an important mechanism to transport metals from the core region to the outer parts of the cluster. The smooth temperature profile across the sharp jump in the metalicity indicates the presence of heat conduction and the lack of mixing across the discontinuity. The cool blob of gas NW of the central galaxy was probably pushed away from the core and squeezed by the adjacent bubble, where it can cool efficiently and relatively undisturbed by the AGN. Shock induced mixing between the two phases may cause the 0.5 keV gas to cool non-radiatively and explain our non-detection of gas below 0.5 keV.
  • Ultra-compact X-ray binaries consist of a neutron star or black hole that accretes material from a white dwarf-donor star. The ultra-compact nature is expressed in very short orbital periods of less than 1 hour. In the case of 4U 0614+091 oxygen-rich material from a CO or ONe white dwarf is flowing to the neutron star. This oxygen-rich disc can reflect X-rays emitted by the neutron star giving a characteristic emission spectrum. We have analyzed high-resolution RGS and broad band EPIC spectra of 4U 0614+091 obtained by the XMM-Newton satellite. We detect a broad emission feature at ~0.7 keV in both instruments, which cannot be explained by unusual abundances of oxygen and neon in the line of sight, as proposed before in the literature. We interpret this feature as O VIII Lyalpha emission caused by reflection of X-rays off highly ionized oxygen, in the strong gravitational field close to the neutron star.
  • The hot Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) in clusters of galaxies is a very large repository of metals produced by supernovae. We aim to accurately measure the abundances in the ICM of many clusters and compare these data with metal yields produced by supernovae. Using the data archive of the XMM-Newton X-ray observatory, we compile a sample of 22 clusters. We fit spectra extracted from the core regions and determine the abundances of silicon, sulfur, argon, alcium, iron, and nickel. The abundances from the spectral fits are subsequently fitted to supernova yields determined from several supernova type Ia and core-collapse supernova models. We find that the argon and calcium abundances cannot be fitted with currently favoured supernova type Ia models. We obtain a major improvement of the fit, when we use an empirically modified delayed-detonation model that is calibrated on the Tycho supernova remnant. The two modified parameters are the density where the sound wave in the supernova turns into a shock and the ratio of the specific internal energies of ions and electrons at the shock. Our fits also suggest that the core-collapse supernovae that contributed to the enrichment of the ICM had progenitors which were already enriched. The Ar/Ca ratio in clusters is a good touchstone for determining the quality of type Ia models. The core-collapse contribution, which is about 50% and not strongly dependent on the IMF or progenitor metallicity, does not have a significant impact on the Ar/Ca ratio. The number ratio between supernova type Ia and core-collapse supernovae suggests that binary systems in the appropriate mass range are very efficient (~ 5-16%) in eventually forming supernova type Ia explosions.
  • MACHO-96-BLG-5 is a microlensing event observed towards the bulge of the Galaxy with exceptionally long duration of $\sim 970$ days. The microlensing parallax fit parameters were used to estimate the lens mass $M=6^{+10}_{-3}$ M$_{\odot}$ and its distance $d$ which results to be in the range 0.5 kpc - 2 kpc. The upper limit on the absolute brightness for main-sequence stars of the same mass is less than 1 $L_{\odot}$ so that the lens is a good black hole candidate. If it is so, the black hole would accrete by interstellar medium thereby emitting in the $X$-ray band. Here, the analysis of an {\it XMM} deep observation towards MACHO-96-BLG-5 lens position is reported. Only an upper limit (at 99.8% confidence level) to the $X$-ray flux from the lens position of $9.10\times 10^{-15}$-- $1.45\times 10^{-14}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in the energy band $0.2-10$ keV has been obtained from that deep observation allowing to constrain the putative black hole accretion parameters.
  • We present here a study of chemical abundances in the giant elliptical galaxy M 87 using high-resolution spectra obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers during two deep XMM-Newton observations. While we confirm the two-temperature structure of the inter-stellar medium (ISM) in M 87, we also show that a continuous temperature distribution describes the data equally well. The high statistics allows us, for the first time, to determine relatively accurate abundance values also for carbon and nitrogen. The comparison of the abundance ratios of C, N, O and Fe in the ISM of M 87 with those in the stellar population of our Galaxy shows that the relative contribution of core-collapse supernovae to the enrichment of the ISM in M 87 is significantly less than in the Milky Way and indicates that the enrichment of the ISM by iron through Type Ia supernovae and by carbon and nitrogen is occurring in parallel. This suggests that the main source of carbon and nitrogen in M 87 are the low- and intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch stars. From the oxygen to iron abundance ratio in the hot gas we estimate that the relative number of core collapse and type Ia supernovae contributing to the enrichment of the ISM in the core of M 87 is ~60% and ~40% respectively. The spatial distributions of iron and oxygen are different. While the oxygen abundance distribution is flat the iron abundance peaks in the core and has a gradient throughout the ~4' wide field of view of the instrument, suggesting an early enrichment by core-collapse supernovae and a continuous contribution of type Ia supernovae.
  • Recently the first detections of highly ionised gas associated with two Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) filaments have been reported. The evidence is based on X-ray absorption lines due to O VII and other ions observed by Chandra towards the bright blazar Mrk 421. We investigate the robustness of this detection by a re-analysis of the original Chandra LETGS spectra, the analysis of a large set of XMM-Newton RGS spectra of Mrk 421, and additional Chandra observations. We address the reliability of individual spectral features belonging to the absorption components, and assess the significance of the detection of these components. We also use Monte Carlo simulations of spectra. We confirm the apparent strength of several features in the Chandra spectra, but demonstrate that they are statistically not significant. This decreased significance is due to the number of redshift trials that are made and that are not taken into account in the original discovery paper. Therefore these features must be attributed to statistical fluctuations. This is confirmed by the RGS spectra, which have a higher signal to noise ratio than the Chandra spectra, but do not show features at the same wavelengths. Finally, we show that the possible association with a Ly-alpha absorption system also lacks sufficient statistical evidence. We conclude that there is insufficient observational proof for the existence of the two proposed WHIM filaments towards Mrk 421, the brightest X-ray blazar on the sky. Therefore, the highly ionised component of the WHIM still remains to be discovered.
  • Using a new long X-ray observation of the cluster of galaxies Sersic 159-03 with XMM-Newton, we derive radial temperature and abundance profiles using single- and multi-temperature models. The fits to the EPIC and RGS spectra prefer multi-temperature models especially in the core. The radial profiles of oxygen and iron measured with EPIC/RGS and the line profiles in RGS suggest that there is a dip in the O/Fe ratio in the centre of the cluster compared to its immediate surroundings. A possible explanation for the large scale metallicity distribution is that SNIa and SNII products are released in the ICM through ram-pressure stripping of in-falling galaxies. This causes a peaked metallicity distribution. In addition, SNIa in the central cD galaxy enrich mainly the centre of the cluster with iron. This excess of SNIa products is consistent with the low O/Fe ratio we detect in the centre of the cluster. We fit the abundances we obtain with yields from SNIa, SNII and Population-III stars to derive the clusters chemical evolution. We find that the measured abundance pattern does not require a Population-III star contribution. The relative contribution of the number of SNIa with respect to the total number of SNe which enrich the ICM is about 25-50%. Furthermore, we discuss the possible presence of a non-thermal component in the EPIC spectra. A potential source of this non-thermal emission can be inverse-Compton scattering between Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons and relativistic electrons, which are accelerated in bow shocks associated with ram-pressure stripping of in-falling galaxies.
  • We present here the results of a deep (130 ks) XMM-Newton observation of the cluster of galaxies 2A 0335+096. The deep exposure allows us to study in detail its temperature structure and its elemental abundances. We fit three different thermal models and find that the multi-temperature wdem model fits our data best. We find that the abundance structure of the cluster is consistent with a scenario where the relative number of Type Ia supernovae contributing to the enrichment of the intra-cluster medium is ~25%, while the relative number of core collapse supernovae is ~75%. Comparison of the observed abundances to the supernova yields does not allow us to put any constrains on the contribution of Pop III stars to the enrichment of the ICM. Radial abundance profiles show a strong central peak of both Type Ia and core collapse supernova products. Both the temperature and iron abundance maps show an asymmetry in the direction of the elongated morphology of the surface brightness. In particular the temperature map shows a sharp change over a brightness edge on the southern side of the core, which was identified as a cold front in the Chandra data. This suggests that the cluster is in the process of a merger with a subcluster. Moreover, we find that the blobs or filaments discovered in the core of the cluster by Chandra are, contrary to the previous results, colder than the ambient gas and they appear to be in pressure equilibrium with their environment.
  • We present results from a new 120 ks XMM-Newton observation of the cluster of galaxies Sersic 159-03. In this paper we focus on the high-resolution X-ray spectra obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS). The spectra allow us to constrain the temperature structure in the core of the cluster and determine the emission measure distribution as a function of temperature. We also fit the line widths of mainly oxygen and iron lines.
  • We report the results from a spatially resolved spectroscopy study with XMM-Newton on the relaxed cluster of galaxies Abell 478. From the EPIC data we extract a temperature profile and radial abundance profiles for Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe and Ni. The abundance profiles follow the same trends as observed in other clusters. The spectra of the core of the cluster can be best fitted with a multi-temperature model. We argue that this multi-temperature behavior is mostly due to projection effects, because of the strong temperature gradient in the core. Contributions from other effects, for example, intrinsic temperature stratification cannot be fully excluded. For the first time we measure an underabundance of oxygen in the Galactic absorption component toward a cluster. The measured oxygen abundance in this absorber is about 0.5 times the solar oxygen abundance as determined by Anders & Grevesse (1989).
  • Using the mosaic of six XMM-Newton observations, we study the hydrodynamic state of the A3562, a cluster in the center of the Shapley Supercluster. The X-ray image reveals a sharp surface brightness gradient within the core of A3562, a 200 kpc ridge extending to the south-west. A nearby group, SC1329-313, imaged within this program also exhibits a tail aligned with the ridge. Study of the pressure and entropy identified the ridge with a 40% pressure enhancement. An associated Mach number of 1.15 relative to a polytropic sound speed for a 5 keV plasma requires the velocity of the group to be 1400 km/s, while the projected velocity difference between the cluster and the group amounts to 1200-1500 km/s. Apparent disruption of the group, if attributed to the ram pressure, also requires the velocity of the group in the cluster frame to amount to 1700+/-150 km/s. The sharp surface brightness gradient at the center is identified with a contact discontinuity, which together with dove tails in the the large-scale entropy distribution reveals a sloshing of the BCG in response to the passage of the SC1329-313 group. Using the extent of the low-entropy tails in A3562 we estimate the amplitude of sloshing motion to be 200/h_70 kpc and the oscillation frequency 1 Gyr.
  • We present an \xmm mosaic observation of the hot ($kT\sim6.5$ keV) and nearby ($z=0.0881$) relaxed cluster of galaxies A478. We derive precise gas density, gas temperature, gas mass and total mass profiles up to $12\arcmin$ (about half of the virial radius $R_{200}$). The gas density profile is highly peaked towards the center and the surface brightness profile is well fitted by a sum of three $\beta$--models. The derived gas density profile is in excellent agreement, both in shape and in normalization, with the published Chandra density profile (measured within $5\arcmin$ of the center). Projection and PSF effects on the temperature profile determination are thoroughly investigated. The derived radial temperature structure is as expected for a cluster hosting a cooling core, with a strong negative gradient at the cluster center. The temperature rises from $\sim2$ keV up to a plateau of $\sim6.5$ keV beyond 2' (i.e. $r>208\rm{kpc}=0.1 R_{200}$, $R_{200}=2.08$ Mpc being the virial radius). From the temperature profile and the density profile and under the hypothesis of hydrostatic equilibrium, we derived the total mass profile of A478 down to 0.01 and up to 0.5 the virial radius. We tested different dark matter models against the observed mass profile. The Navarro, Frenk & White (\cite{navarro97}) model is significantly preferred to other models. It leads to a total mass of $M_{200}=1.1\times 10^{15}$ M$_\odot$ for a concentration parameter of $c=4.2\pm0.4$. The gas mass fraction slightly increases with radius. The gas mass fraction at a density contrast of $\delta=2500$ is $\fgas=0.13\pm0.02$, consistent with previous results on similar hot and massive clusters. We confirm the excess of absorption in the direction of A478.[abridged]
  • INTEGRAL regularly scans the Galactic plane to search for new objects and in particular for absorbed sources with the bulk of their emission above 10-20 keV. The first new INTEGRAL source was discovered on 2003 January 29, 0.5 degree from the Galactic plane and was further observed in the X-rays with XMM-Newton. This source, IGR J16318-4848, is intrinsically strongly absorbed by cold matter and displays exceptionally strong fluorescence emission lines. The likely infrared/optical counterpart indicates that IGR J16318-4848 is probably a High Mass X-Ray Binary neutron star or black hole enshrouded in a Compton thick environment. Strongly absorbed sources, not detected in previous surveys, could contribute significantly to the Galactic hard X-ray background between 10 and 200 keV.