• LOFT (Large Observatory For x-ray Timing) is one of the four missions selected in 2011 for assessment study for the ESA M3 mission in the Cosmic Vision program, expected to be launched in 2024. The LOFT mission will carry two instruments with their prime sensitivity in the 2-30 keV range: a 10 m^2 class large area detector (LAD) with a <1{\deg} collimated field of view and a wide field monitor (WFM) instrument based on the coded mask principle, providing coverage of more than 1/3 of the sky. The LAD will provide an effective area ~20 times larger than any previous mission and will by timing studies be able to address fundamental questions about strong gravity in the vicinity of black holes and the equation of state of nuclear matter in neutron stars. The prime goal of the WFM will be to detect transient sources to be observed by the LAD. However, with its wide field of view and good energy resolution of <300 eV, the WFM will be an excellent monitoring instrument to study long term variability of many classes of X-ray sources. The sensitivity of the WFM will be 2.1 mCrab in a one day observation, and 270 mCrab in 3s in observations of in the crowded field of the Galactic Center. The high duty cycle of the instrument will make it an ideal detector of fast transient phenomena, like X-ray bursters, soft gamma repeaters, terrestrial gamma flashes, and not least provide unique capabilities in the study of gamma ray bursts. A dedicated burst alert system will enable the distribution to the community of ~100 gamma ray burst positions per year with a ~1 arcmin location accuracy within 30 s of the burst. This paper provides an overview of the design, configuration, and capabilities of the LOFT WFM instrument.
  • We present the simulator we developed for the Wide Field Monitor (WFM) aboard the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT) mission, one of the four ESA M3 candidate missions considered for launch in the 2022-2024 timeframe. The WFM is designed to cover a large FoV in the same bandpass as the Large Area Detector (LAD, almost 50% of its accessible sky in the energy range 2-50 keV), in order to trigger follow-up observations with the LAD for the most interesting sources. Moreover, its design would allow to detect transient events with fluxes down to a few mCrab in 1-day exposure, for which good spectral and timing resolution would be also available (about 300 eV FWHM and 10 {\mu}s, respectively). In order to investigate possible WFM configurations satisfying these scientific requirements and assess the instrument performance, an end-to-end WFM simulator has been developed. We can reproduce a typical astrophysical observation, taking into account both mask and detector physical properties. We will discuss the WFM simulator architecture and the derived instrumental response.
  • We report on BeppoSAX simultaneous X- and gamma-ray observations of the bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 990123. We present the broad-band spectrum of the prompt emission, including optical, X- and gamma-rays, confirming the suggestion that the emission mechanisms at low and high frequencies must have different physical origins. We discuss the X-ray afterglow observed by the Narrow Field Instruments (NFIs) on board BeppoSAX and its hard X-ray emission up to 60 keV several hours after the burst, in the framework of the standard fireball model. The effects of including an important contribution of Inverse Compton scattering or modifying the hydrodynamics are studied.
  • We report on BeppoSAX simultaneous X- and gamma-ray observations of the bright GRB 990123. We present the broad-band spectrum of the prompt emission, including optical, X- and gamma-rays, confirming the suggestion that the emission mechanisms at low and high frequencies must have different physical origins. In the framework of the standard fireball model, we discuss the X-ray afterglow observed by the NFIs and its hard X-ray emission up to 60 keV several hours after the burst, detected for about 20 ks by the PDS. Considering the 2-10 keV and optical light curves, the 0.1-60 keV spectrum during the 20 ks in which the PDS signal was present and the 8.46 GHz upper limits, we find that the multi-wavelength observations cannot be readily accommodated by basic afterglow models. While the temporal and spectral behavior of the optical afterglow is possibly explained by a synchrotron cooling frequency between the optical and the X-ray energy band during the NFIs observations, in X-rays this assumption only accounts for the slope of the 2-10 keV light curve, but not for the flatness of the 0.1-60 keV spectrum. Including the contribution of Inverse Compton (IC) scattering, we solve the problem of the flat X-ray spectrum and justify the hard X-ray emission; we suggest that the lack of a significant detection of 15-60 keV emission in the following 75 ks and last 70 ks spectra, should be related to poorer statistics rather than to an important suppression of IC contribution. However, considering also the radio band data, we find the 8.46 GHz upper limits violated. On the other hand, leaving unchanged the emission mechanism requires modifying the hydrodynamics by invoking an ambient medium whose density rises rapidly with radius and by having the shock losing energy. Thus we are left with an open puzzle which requires further inspection.
  • Until recently the positions of gamma ray bursts were not sufficiently well known within a short timescale to localize and identify them with known celestial sources. Following the historical detection of the X-ray afterglow of the burst GRB970228, extending from 30 s to 3 days after the main peak, by the Beppo-SAX satellite and that of an optical transient 21 hr after the burst, we report here the detection of the same optical transient, in images obtained only 16 hours after the burst.