• Active plasma lenses have the potential to enable broad-ranging applications of plasma-based accelerators owing to their compact design and radially symmetric kT/m-level focusing fields, facilitating beam-quality preservation and compact beam transport. We report on the direct measurement of magnetic field gradients in active plasma lenses and demonstrate their impact on the emittance of a charged particle beam. This is made possible by the use of a well-characterized electron beam with 1.4mmmrad normalized emittance from a conventional accelerator. Field gradients of up to 823T/m are investigated. The observed emittance evolution is supported by numerical simulations, which demonstrate the conservation of the core beam emittance in such a plasma lens setup.
  • A method for the asymmetric focusing of electron bunches, based on the active plasma lensing technique is proposed. This method takes advantage of the strong inhomogeneous magnetic field generated inside the capillary discharge plasma to focus the ultrarelativistic electrons. The plasma and magnetic field parameters inside the capillary discharge are described theoretically and modeled with dissipative magnetohydrodynamic computer simulations enabling analysis of the capillaries of rectangle cross-sections. Large aspect ratio rectangular capillaries might be used to transport electron beams with high emittance asymmetries, as well as assist in forming spatially flat electron bunches for final focusing before the interaction point.
  • It is a long-standing dream of scientists to capture the ultra-fast dynamics of molecular or chemical reactions in real time and to make a molecular movie. With free-electron lasers delivering extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light at unprecedented intensities, in combination with pump-probe schemes, it is now possible to visualize structural changes on the femtosecond time scale in photo-excited molecules. In hydrocarbons the absorption of a single photon may trigger the migration of a hydrogen atom within the molecule. Here, such a reaction was filmed in acetylene molecules (C2H2) showing a partial migration of one of the protons along the carbon backbone which is consistent with dynamics calculations on ab initio potential energy surfaces. Our approach opens attractive perspectives and potential applications for a large variety of XUV-induced ultra-fast phenomena in molecules relevant to physics, chemistry, and biology.
  • Using a combined theoretical and experimental approach, we investigate the non-adiabatic dynamics of the prototypical ethylene (C2H4) molecule upon {\pi} \to {\pi}* excitation. In this first part of a two part series, we focus on the lifetime of the excited electronic state. The femtosecond Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectrum (TRPES) of ethylene is simulated based on our recent molecular dynamics simulation using the ab initio multiple spawning method (AIMS) with Multi-State Second Order Perturbation Theory (Tao, et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 113 13656 2009). We find excellent agreement between the TRPES calculation and the photoion signal observed in a pump-probe experiment using femtosecond vacuum ultraviolet (h{\nu} = 7.7 eV) pulses for both pump and probe. These results explain the apparent discrepancy over the excited state lifetime between theory and experiment that has existed for ten years, with experiments (e.g., Farmanara, et al. Chem. Phys. Lett. 288 518 1998 and Kosma, et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 112 7514 2008) reporting much shorter lifetimes than predicted by theory. Investigation of the TRPES indicates that the fast decay of the photoion yield originates from both energetic and electronic factors, with the energetic factor playing a larger role in shaping the signal.
  • Through a combined experimental and theoretical approach, we study the nonadiabatic dynamics of the prototypical ethylene (C$_2$H$_4$) molecule upon $\pi \rightarrow \pi^*$ excitation with 161 nm light. Using a novel experimental apparatus, we combine femtosecond pulses of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation with variable delay to perform time resolved photo-ion fragment spectroscopy. In this second part of a two part series, the extreme ultraviolet (17 eV$ < h \nu < 23$ eV) probe pulses are sufficiently energetic to break the C-C bond in photoionization, or photoionize the dissociation products of the vibrationally hot ground state. The experimental data is directly compared to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations accounting for both the pump and probe steps. Enhancements of the CH$_2^+$ and CH$_3^+$ photoion fragment yields, corresponding to molecules photoionized in ethylene (CH$_2$CH$_2$) and ethylidene (CH$_3$CH) like geometries are observed within 100 fs after $\pi \rightarrow \pi^*$ excitation. Quantitative agreement between theory and experiment on the relative CH$_2^+$ and CH$_3^+$ yields provides experimental confirmation of the theoretical prediction of two distinct transition states and their branching ratio (Tao, et al. J. Phys. Chem. A. 113, 13656 (2009)). Fast, non-statistical, elimination of H$_2$ molecules and H atoms is observed in the time resolved H$_2^+$ and H$^+$ signals.
  • We combine different wavelengths from an intense high-order harmonics source with variable delay at the focus of a split-mirror interferometer to conduct pump-probe experiments on gas-phase molecules. We report measurements of the time resolution (<44 fs) and spatial profiles (4 {\mu}m x 12 {\mu}m) at the focus of the apparatus. We demonstrate the utility of this two-color, high-order-harmonic technique by time resolving molecular hydrogen elimination from C2H4 excited into its absorption band at 161 nm.