• We study the transmission phase shift across a Kondo correlated quantum dot in a GaAs heterostructure at temperatures below the Kondo temperature ($T < T_{\rm K}$), where the phase shift is expected to show a plateau at $\pi/2$ for an ideal Kondo singlet ground state. Our device is tuned such that the ratio $\Gamma/U$ of level width $\Gamma$ to charging energy $U$ is quite large ($\lesssim 0.5$ rather than $\ll 1$). This situation is commonly used in GaAs quantum dots to ensure Kondo temperatures large enough ($\simeq 100$ mK here) to be experimentally accessible; however it also implies that charge fluctuations are more pronounced than typically assumed in theoretical studies focusing on the regime $\Gamma/U \ll 1$ needed to ensure a well-defined local moment. Our measured phase evolves monotonically by $\pi$ across the two Coulomb peaks, but without being locked at $\pi/2$ in the Kondo valley for $T \ll T_{\rm K}$, due to a significant influence of large $\Gamma/U$. Only when $\Gamma/U$ is reduced sufficiently does the phase start to be locked around $\pi/2$ and develops into a plateau at $\pi/2$. Our observations are consistent with numerical renormalization group calculations, and can be understood as a direct consequence of the Friedel sum rule that relates the transmission phase shift to the local occupancy of the dot, and thermal average of a transmission coefficient through a resonance level near the Fermi energy.
  • Quantum impurity problems can be solved using the numerical renormalization group (NRG), which involves discretizing the free conduction electron system and mapping to a `Wilson chain'. It was shown recently that Wilson chains for different electronic species can be interleaved by use of a modified discretization, dramatically increasing the numerical efficiency of the RG scheme [Phys. Rev. B 89, 121105(R) (2014)]. Here we systematically examine the accuracy and efficiency of the `interleaved' NRG (iNRG) method in the context of the single impurity Anderson model, the two-channel Kondo model, and a three-channel Anderson-Hund model. The performance of iNRG is explicitly compared with `standard' NRG (sNRG): when the average number of states kept per iteration is the same in both calculations, the accuracy of iNRG is equivalent to that of sNRG but the computational costs are signifficantly lower in iNRG when the same symmetries are exploited. Although iNRG weakly breaks SU(N) channel symmetry (if present), both accuracy and numerical cost are entirely competitive with sNRG exploiting full symmetries. iNRG is therefore shown to be a viable and technically simple alternative to sNRG for high-symmetry models. Moreover, iNRG can be used to solve a range of lower-symmetry multiband problems that are inaccessible to sNRG.
  • We analyze the process of thermalization, dynamics and the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) for the single impurity Anderson model, focusing on the Kondo regime. For this we construct the complete eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian using the numerical renormalization group (NRG) method in the language of the matrix product states. It is a peculiarity of the NRG that while the Wilson chain is supposed to describe a macroscopic bath, very few single particle excitations already suffice to essentially thermalize the impurity system at finite temperature, which amounts to having added a macroscopic amount of energy. Thus given an initial state of the system such as the ground state together with microscopic excitations, we calculate the spectral function of the impurity using the microcanonical and diagonal and grand canonical ensembles. By adding or removing particles at a certain Wilson energy shell on top of the ground state, we find qualitative agreement between the spectral functions calculated for different ensembles. This indicates that the system thermalizes in the long-time limit, and can be described by an appropriate statistical-mechanical ensemble. Moreover, by calculating the impurity spectral density at the Fermi level and the dot occupancy for energy eigenstates relevant for microcanonical ensemble, we find good support for ETH. The ultimate mechanism responsible for this effective thermalization within the NRG can be identified as Anderson orthogonality: the more charge that needs to flow to or from infinity after applying a local excitation within the Wilson chain, the more the system looks thermal afterwards at an increased temperature. For the same reason, however, thermalization fails if charge rearrangement after the excitation remains mostly local.
  • We show that the numerical renormalization group (NRG) is a viable multi-band impurity solver for Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT), offering unprecedent real-frequency spectral resolution at arbitrarily low energies and temperatures. We use it to obtain a numerically exact DMFT solution to the Hund's metal problem for a three-orbital model with filling factor $n_d=2$. The ground state is a Fermi liquid. The one-particle spectral function has a strong particle-hole asymmetry, with a clear apparent power law for positive frequencies only. With increasing temperature it shows a coherence-incoherence crossover with spectral weight transfered from low to high energies and evolves qualitatively differently from a doped Mott insulator. The spin and orbital spectral functions show "spin-orbital separation": spin screening occurs at much lower energies than orbital screening. The renormalization group flows clearly reveal the relevant physics at all energy scales.
  • We report on the direct observation of the transmission phase shift through a Kondo correlated quantum dot by employing a new type of two-path interferometer. We observed a clear $\pi/2$-phase shift, which persists up to the Kondo temperature $T_{\rm K}$. Above this temperature, the phase shifts by more than $\pi/2$ at each Coulomb peak, approaching the behavior observed for the standard Coulomb blockade regime. These observations are in remarkable agreement with 2-level numerical renormalization group calculations. The unique combination of experimental and theoretical results presented here fully elucidates the phase evolution in the Kondo regime.
  • We investigate the effect of many-body interactions on the optical absorption spectrum of a charge-tunable quantum dot coupled to a degenerate electron gas. A constructive Fano interference between an indirect path, associated with an intra dot exciton generation followed by tunneling, and a direct path, associated with the ionization of a valence-band quantum dot electron, ensures the visibility of the ensuing Fermi-edge singularity despite weak absorption strength. We find good agreement between experiment and renormalization group theory, but only when we generalize the Anderson impurity model to include a static hole and a dynamic dot-electron scattering potential. The latter highlights the fact that an optically active dot acts as a tunable quantum impurity, enabling the investigation of a new dynamic regime of Fermi-edge physics.
  • Spin exchange between a single-electron charged quantum dot and itinerant electrons leads to an emergence of Kondo correlations. When the quantum dot is driven resonantly by weak laser light, the resulting emission spectrum allows for a direct probe of these correlations. In the opposite limit of vanishing exchange interaction and strong laser drive, the quantum dot exhibits coherent oscillations between the single-spin and optically excited states. Here, we show that the interplay between strong exchange and non-perturbative laser coupling leads to the formation of a new nonequilibrium quantum-correlated state, characterized by the emergence of a laser-induced secondary spin screening cloud, and examine the implications for the emission spectrum.
  • We consider iron impurities in the noble metals gold and silver and compare experimental data for the resistivity and decoherence rate to numerical renormalization group results. By exploiting non-Abelian symmetries we show improved numerical data for both quantities as compared to previous calculations [Costi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 056802 (2009)], using the discarded weight as criterion to reliably judge the quality of convergence of the numerical data. In addition we also carry out finite-temperature calculations for the magnetoresistivity of fully screened Kondo models with S = 1/2, 1 and 3/2, and compare the results with available measurements for iron in silver, finding excellent agreement between theory and experiment for the spin-3/2 three-channel Kondo model. This lends additional support to the conclusion of Costi et al. that the latter model provides a good effective description of the Kondo physics of iron impurities in gold and silver.
  • We study the quantum corrections to the polarizability of isolated metallic mesoscopic systems using the loop-expansion in diffusive propagators. We show that the difference between connected (grand-canonical ensemble) and isolated (canonical ensemble) systems appears only in subleading terms of the expansion, and can be neglected if the frequency of the external field, $\omega$, is of the order of (or even slightly smaller than) the mean level spacing, $\Delta$. If $\omega \ll \Delta$, the two-loop correction becomes important. We calculate it by systematically evaluating the ballistic parts (the Hikami boxes) of the corresponding diagrams and exploiting electroneutrality. Our theory allows one to take into account a finite dephasing rate, $\gamma$, generated by electron interactions, and it is complementary to the non-perturbative results obtained from a combination of Random Matrix Theory (RMT) and the $\sigma$-model, valid at $\gamma \to 0$. Remarkably, we find that the two-loop result for isolated systems with moderately weak dephasing, $\gamma \sim \Delta$, is similar to the result of the RMT+$\sigma$-model even in the limit $\omega \to 0$. For smaller $\gamma$, we discuss the possibility to interpolate between the perturbative and the non-perturbative results. We compare our results for the temperature dependence of the polarizability of isolated rings to the experimental data of Deblock \emph{et al} [\prl \ {\bf 84}, 5379 (2000); \prb \ {\bf 65}, 075301 (2002)], and we argue that the elusive 0D regime of dephasing might have manifested itself in the observed magneto-oscillations. Besides, we thoroughly discuss possible future measurements of the polarizability, which could aim to reveal the existence of 0D dephasing and the role of the Pauli blocking at small temperatures.
  • We study Johnson-Nyquist noise in macroscopically inhomogeneous disordered metals and give a microscopic derivation of the correlation function of the scalar electric potentials in real space. Starting from the interacting Hamiltonian for electrons in a metal and the random phase approximation, we find a relation between the correlation function of the electric potentials and the density fluctuations which is valid for arbitrary geometry and dimensionality. We show that the potential fluctuations are proportional to the solution of the diffusion equation, taken at zero frequency. As an example, we consider networks of quasi-1D disordered wires and give an explicit expression for the correlation function in a ring attached via arms to absorbing leads. We use this result in order to develop a theory of dephasing by electronic noise in multiply-connected systems.
  • We investigate quantum dots in clean single-wall carbon nanotubes with ferromagnetic PdNi-leads in the Kondo regime. In most odd Coulomb valleys the Kondo resonance exhibits a pronounced splitting, which depends on the tunnel coupling to the leads and an external magnetic field $B$, and only weakly on gate voltage. Using numerical renormalization group calculations, we demonstrate that all salient features of the data can be understood using a simple model for the magnetic properties of the leads. The magnetoconductance at zero bias and low temperature depends in a universal way on $g \mu_B (B-B_c) / k_B T_K$, where $T_K$ is the Kondo temperature and $B_c$ the external field compensating the splitting.
  • We analyze dephasing by electron interactions in a small disordered quasi-one dimensional (1D) ring weakly coupled to leads, where we recently predicted a crossover for the dephasing time $\tPh(T)$ from diffusive or ergodic 1D ($\tPh^{-1} \propto T^{2/3}, T^{1}$) to $0D$ behavior ($\tPh^{-1} \propto T^{2}$) as $T$ drops below the Thouless energy $\ETh$. We provide a detailed derivation of our results, based on an influence functional for quantum Nyquist noise, and calculate all leading and subleading terms of the dephasing time in the three regimes. Explicitly taking into account the Pauli blocking of the Fermi sea in the metal allows us to describe the $0D$ regime on equal footing as the others. The crossover to $0D$, predicted by Sivan, Imry and Aronov for 3D systems, has so far eluded experimental observation. We will show that for $T \ll \ETh$, $0D$ dephasing governs not only the $T$-dependence for the smooth part of the magnetoconductivity but also for the amplitude of the Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations, which result only from electron paths winding around the ring. This observation can be exploited to filter out and eliminate contributions to dephasing from trajectories which do not wind around the ring, which may tend to mask the $T^{2}$ behavior. Thus, the ring geometry holds promise of finally observing the crossover to $0D$ experimentally.
  • We study dephasing by electron interactions in a small disordered quasi-one dimensional (1D) ring weakly coupled to leads. We use an influence functional for quantum Nyquist noise to describe the crossover for the dephasing time $\Tph (T)$ from diffusive or ergodic 1D ($ \Tph^{-1} \propto T^{2/3}, T^{1}$) to 0D behavior ($\Tph^{-1} \propto T^{2}$) as $T$ drops below the Thouless energy. The crossover to 0D, predicted earlier for 2D and 3D systems, has so far eluded experimental observation. The ring geometry holds promise of meeting this longstanding challenge, since the crossover manifests itself not only in the smooth part of the magnetoconductivity but also in the amplitude of Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations. This allows signatures of dephasing in the ring to be cleanly extracted by filtering out those of the leads.
  • A single confined spin interacting with a solid-state environment has emerged as one of the fundamental paradigms of mesoscopic physics. In contrast to standard quantum optical systems, decoherence that stems from these interactions can in general not be treated using the Born-Markov approximation at low temperatures. Here we study the non-equilibrium dynamics of a single-spin in a semiconductor quantum dot adjacent to a fermionic reservoir and show how the dynamics can be revealed in detail in an optical absorption experiment. We show that the highly asymmetrical optical absorption lineshape of the resulting Kondo exciton consists of three distinct frequency domains, corresponding to short, intermediate and long times after the initial excitation, which are in turn described by the three fixed points of the single-impurity Anderson Hamiltonian. The zero-temperature power-law singularity dominating the lineshape is linked to dynamically generated Kondo correlations in the photo-excited state. We show that this power-law singularity is tunable with gate voltage and magnetic field, and universal.
  • We exploit the decoherence of electrons due to magnetic impurities, studied via weak localization, to resolve a longstanding question concerning the classic Kondo systems of Fe impurities in the noble metals gold and silver: which Kondo-type model yields a realistic description of the relevant multiple bands, spin and orbital degrees of freedom? Previous studies suggest a fully screened spin $S$ Kondo model, but the value of $S$ remained ambiguous. We perform density functional theory calculations that suggest $S = 3/2$. We also compare previous and new measurements of both the resistivity and decoherence rate in quasi 1-dimensional wires to numerical renormalization group predictions for $S=1/2,1$ and 3/2, finding excellent agreement for $S=3/2$.
  • Trapped ions arranged in Coulomb crystals provide us with the elements to study the physics of a single spin coupled to a boson bath. In this work we show that optical forces allow us to realize a variety of spin-boson models, depending on the crystal geometry and the laser configuration. We study in detail the Ohmic case, which can be implemented by illuminating a single ion with a travelling wave. The mesoscopic character of the phonon bath in trapped ions induces new effects like the appearance of quantum revivals in the spin evolution.
  • We systematically study the influence of ferromagnetic leads on the Kondo resonance in a quantum dot tuned to the local moment regime. We employ Wilson's numerical renormalization group method, extended to handle leads with a spin asymmetric density of states, to identify the effects of (i) a finite spin polarization in the leads (at the Fermi-surface), (ii) a Stoner splitting in the bands (governed by the band edges) and (iii) an arbitrary shape of the leads density of states. For a generic lead density of states the quantum dot favors being occupied by a particular spin-species due to exchange interaction with ferromagnetic leads leading to a suppression and splitting of the Kondo resonance. The application of a magnetic field can compensate this asymmetry restoring the Kondo effect. We study both the gate-voltage dependence (for a fixed band structure in the leads) and the spin polarization dependence (for fixed gate voltage) of this compensation field for various types of bands. Interestingly, we find that the full recovery of the Kondo resonance of a quantum dot in presence of leads with an energy dependent density of states is not only possible by an appropriately tuned external magnetic field but also via an appropriately tuned gate voltage. For flat bands simple formulas for the splitting of the local level as a function of the spin polarization and gate voltage are given.
  • We study finite-frequency transport properties of the double-dot system recently constructed to observe the two-channel Kondo effect [R. M. Potok et al., Nature 446, 167 (2007)]. We derive an analytical expression for the frequency-dependent linear conductance of this device in the Kondo regime. We show how the features characteristic of the 2-channel Kondo quantum critical point emerge in this quantity, which we compute using the results of conformal field theory as well as numerical renormalization group methods. We determine the universal cross-over functions describing non-Fermi liquid vs. Fermi liquid cross-overs and also investigate the effects of a finite magnetic field.
  • Transmission phase \alpha measurements of many-electron quantum dots (small mean level spacing \delta) revealed universal phase lapses by \pi between consecutive resonances. In contrast, for dots with only a few electrons (large \delta), the appearance or not of a phase lapse depends on the dot parameters. We show that a model of a multi-level quantum dot with local Coulomb interactions and arbitrary level-lead couplings reproduces the generic features of the observed behavior. The universal behavior of \alpha for small \delta follows from Fano-type antiresonances of the renormalized single-particle levels.
  • We investigate the appearance of pi lapses in the transmission phase theta of a two-level quantum dot with Coulomb interaction U. Using the numerical and functional renormalization group methods we study the entire parameter space for spin-polarized as well as spin-degenerate dots, modeled by spinless or spinful electrons, respectively. We investigate the effect of finite temperatures T. For small T and sufficiently small single-particle spacings delta of the dot levels we find pi phase lapses between two transmission peaks in an overwhelming part of the parameter space of the level-lead couplings. For large delta the appearance or not of a phase lapse between resonances depends on the relative sign of the level-lead couplings in analogy to the U=0 case. We show that this generic scenario is the same for spin-polarized and spin-degenerate dots. We emphasize that in contrast to dots with more levels, for a two-level dot with small delta and generic dot-lead couplings (that is up to cases with special symmetry) the "universal" phase lapse behavior is already established at U=0. The most important effect of the Coulomb interaction is to increase the separation of the transmission resonances. The relation of the appearance of phase lapses to the inversion of the population of the dot levels is discussed. For the spin-polarized case and low temperatures we compare our results to recent mean-field studies. For small delta correlations are found to strongly alter the mean-field picture.
  • Recently, A. Jerez, P. Vitushinsky and M. Lavagna [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 127203 (2005)] claimed that the transmission phase through a quantum fot, as measured via the Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, differs from the phase which determines the corresponding conductance. Here we show that this claim is wrong for the single level Anderson model, which is usually used to describe the quantum dot. So far, there exists no derivation of this claim from any explicit theoretical model.
  • We study inelastic scattering of energetic electrons off a Kondo impurity. If the energy E of the incoming electron (measured from the Fermi level) exceeds significantly the Kondo temperature T_K, then the differential inelastic cross-section \sigma (E,w), i.e., the cross-section characterizing scattering of an electron with a given energy transfer w, is well-defined. We show that \sigma (E,w) factorizes into two parts. The E-dependence of \sigma (E,w) is logarithmically weak and is due to the Kondo renormalization of the effective coupling. We are able to relate the w-dependence to the spin-spin correlation function of the magnetic impurity. Using this relation, we demonstrate that in the absence of magnetic field the dynamics of the impurity spin causes the electron scattering to be inelastic at any temperature. Quenching of the spin dynamics by an applied magnetic field results in a finite elastic component of the electron scattering cross-section. The differential scattering cross-section may be extracted from the measurements of relaxation of hot electrons injected in conductors containing localized spins.
  • We study the AC conductance and equilibrium current fluctuations of a Coulomb blockaded quantum dot. A relation between the equilibrium spectral function and the linear AC conductance is derived which is valid for frequencies well below the charging energy of the quantum dot. Frequency-dependent transport measurements can thus give experimental access to the Kondo peak in the equilibrium spectral function of a quantum dot. We illustrate this in detail for typical experimental parameters using the numerical renormalization group method in combination with the Kubo formalism.
  • Recent experiments measuring the emission of exciton recombination in a self-organized single quantum dot (QD) have revealed that novel effects occur when the wetting layer surrounding the QD becomes filled with electrons, because the resulting Fermi sea can hybridize with the local electron levels on the dot. Motivated by these experiments, we study an extended Anderson model, which describes a local conduction band level coupled to a Fermi sea, but also includes a local valence band level. We are interested, in particular, on how many-body correlations resulting from the presence of the Fermi sea affect the absorption and emission spectra. Using Wilson's numerical renormalization group method, we calculate the zero-temperature absorption (emission) spectrum of a QD which starts from (ends up in) a strongly correlated Kondo ground state. We predict two features: Firstly, we find that the spectrum shows a power law divergence close to the threshold, with an exponent that can be understood by analogy to the well-known X-ray edge absorption problem. Secondly, the threshold energy $\omega_0$ - below which no photon is absorbed (above which no photon is emitted) - shows a marked, monotonic shift as a function of the exciton binding energy $U_{\rm exc}$
  • We investigate the propagation of density-wave packets in a Bose-Hubbard model using the adaptive time-dependent density-matrix renormalization group method. We discuss the decay of the amplitude with time and the dependence of the velocity on density, interaction strength and the height of the perturbation in a numerically exact way, covering arbitrary interactions and amplitudes of the perturbation. In addition, we investigate the effect of self-steepening due to the amplitude dependence of the velocity and discuss the possibilities for an experimental detection of the moving wave packet in time of flight pictures. By comparing the sound velocity to theoretical predictions, we determine the limits of a Gross-Pitaevskii or Bogoliubov type description and the regime where repulsive one-dimensional Bose gases exhibit fermionic behaviour.