• We use the Nernst effect to delineate the boundary of the pseudogap phase in the temperature-doping phase diagram of cuprate superconductors. New data for the Nernst coefficient $\nu(T)$ of YBa$_{2}$Cu$_{3}$O$_{y}$ (YBCO), La$_{1.8-x}$Eu$_{0.2}$Sr$_x$CuO$_4$ (Eu-LSCO) and La$_{1.6-x}$Nd$_{0.4}$Sr$_x$CuO$_4$ (Nd-LSCO) are presented and compared with previous data including La$_{2-x}$Sr$_x$CuO$_4$ (LSCO). The temperature $T_\nu$ at which $\nu/T$ deviates from its high-temperature behaviour is found to coincide with the temperature at which the resistivity deviates from its linear-$T$ dependence, which we take as the definition of the pseudogap temperature $T^\star$- in agreement with gap opening detected in ARPES data. We track $T^\star$ as a function of doping and find that it decreases linearly vs $p$ in all four materials, having the same value in the three LSCO-based cuprates, irrespective of their different crystal structures. At low $p$, $T^\star$ is higher than the onset temperature of the various orders observed in underdoped cuprates, suggesting that these orders are secondary instabilities of the pseudogap phase. A linear extrapolation of $T^\star(p)$ to $p=0$ yields $T^\star(p\to 0)\simeq T_N(0)$, the N\'eel temperature for the onset of antiferromagnetic order at $p=0$, suggesting that there is a link between pseudogap and antiferromagnetism. With increasing $p$, $T^\star(p)$ extrapolates linearly to zero at $p\simeq p_{\rm c2}$, the critical doping below which superconductivity emerges at high doping, suggesting that the conditions which favour pseudogap formation also favour pairing. We also use the Nernst effect to investigate how far superconducting fluctuations extend above $T_{\rm c}$, as a function of doping, and find that a narrow fluctuation regime tracks $T_{\rm c}$, and not $T^\star$. This confirms that the pseudogap phase is not a form of precursor superconductivity.
  • The perovskite SrIrO3 is an exotic narrow-band metal owing to a confluence of the strengths of the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and the electron-electron correlations. It has been proposed that topological and magnetic insulating phases can be achieved by tuning the SOC, Hubbard interactions, and/or lattice symmetry. Here, we report that the substitution of nonmagnetic, isovalent Sn4+ for Ir4+ in the SrIr1-xSnxO3 perovskites synthesized under high pressure leads to a metal-insulator transition to an antiferromagnetic (AF) phase at TN > 225 K. The continuous change of the cell volume as detected by x-ray diffraction and the lamda-shape transition of the specific heat on cooling through TN demonstrate that the metal-insulator transition is of second-order. Neutron powder diffraction results indicate that the Sn substitution enlarges an octahedral-site distortion that reduces the SOC relative to the spin-spin exchange interaction and results in the type-G AF spin ordering below TN. Measurement of high-temperature magnetic susceptibility shows the evolution of magnetic coupling in the paramagnetic phase typical of weak itinerant-electron magnetism in the Sn-substituted samples. A reduced structural symmetry in the magnetically ordered phase leads to an electron gap opening at the Brillouin zone boundary below TN in the same way as proposed by Slater.
  • We report a high-pressure study on the heavily electron doped Lix(NH3)yFe2Se2 single crystal by using the cubic anvil cell apparatus. The superconducting transition temperature Tc = 44 K at ambient pressure is first suppressed to below 20 K upon increasing pressure to Pc = 2 GPa, above which the pressure dependence of Tc(P) reverses and Tc increases steadily to ca. 55 K at 11 GPa. These results thus evidenced a pressure-induced second high-Tc superconducting (SC-II) phase in Lix(NH3)yFe2Se2 with the highest Tcmax = 55K among the FeSe-based bulk materials. Hall data confirm that in the emergent SC-II phase the dominant electron-type carrier density undergoes a fourfold enhancement and tracks the same trend as Tc(P). Interesting, we find a nearly parallel scaling behavior between Tc and the inverse Hall coefficient for the SC-II phases of both Lix(NH3)yFe2Se2 and (Li,Fe)OHFeSe. The present work demonstrates that high pressure offers a distinctive means to further raising the maximum Tc of heavily electron doped FeSe-based materials by increasing the effective charge carrier concentration via a plausible Fermi surface reconstruction at Pc.
  • A fundamental issue concerning iron-based superconductivity is the roles of electronic nematicity and magnetism in realising high transition temperature ($T_{\rm c}$). To address this issue, FeSe is a key material, as it exhibits a unique pressure phase diagram involving nonmagnetic nematic and pressure-induced antiferromagnetic ordered phases. However, as these two phases in FeSe overlap with each other, the effects of two orders on superconductivity remain perplexing. Here we construct the three-dimensional electronic phase diagram, temperature ($T$) against pressure ($P$) and isovalent S-substitution ($x$), for FeSe$_{1-x}$S$_{x}$, in which we achieve a complete separation of nematic and antiferromagnetic phases. In between, an extended nonmagnetic tetragonal phase emerges, where we find a striking enhancement of $T_{\rm c}$. The completed phase diagram uncovers two superconducting domes with similarly high $T_{\rm c}$ on both ends of the dome-shaped antiferromagnetic phase. The $T_{\rm c}(P,x)$ variation implies that nematic fluctuations unless accompanying magnetism are not relevant for high-$T_{\rm c}$ superconductivity in this system.
  • The pressure-induced reemergence of the second high-Tc superconducting phase (SC-II) in the alkali-metal intercalated AxFe2-ySe2 (A = K, Rb, Cs, Tl) remains an enigma and proper characterizations on the superconducting- and normal-state properties of the SC-II phase were hampered by the intrinsic inhomogeneity and phase separation. To elucidate this intriguing problem, we performed a detailed high-pressure magnetotransport study on the recently discovered (Li1-xFex)OHFe1-ySe single crystals, which have high Tc~40 K and share similar Fermi surface topology as AxFe2-ySe2, but are free from the sample complications. We found that the ambient-pressure Tc~41 K is suppressed gradually to below 2 K upon increasing pressure to Pc ~5 GPa, above which a SC-II phase with higher Tc emerges and the Tc increases progressively to above 50 K up to 12.5 GPa. Interestingly, our high-precision resistivity data enable us to uncover the sharp transition of the normal state from a Fermi liquid for SC-I phase (0 < P < 5 GPa) to a non-Fermi-liquid for SC-II phase (P > 5GPa). In addition, the reemergence of high-Tc SC-II phase is found to accompany with a concurrent enhancement of electron carrier density. Since high-pressure structural study based on the synchrotron X-ray diffraction rules out the structural transition below 10 GPa, the observed SC-II phase with enhanced carrier density should be ascribed to an electronic origin associated with a pressure-induced Fermi surface reconstruction.
  • The importance of electron-hole interband interactions is widely acknowledged for iron-pnictide superconductors with high transition temperatures (Tc). However, high-Tc superconductivity without hole carriers has been suggested in FeSe single-layer films and intercalated iron-selenides, raising a fundamental question whether iron pnictides and chalcogenides have different pairing mechanisms. Here, we study the properties of electronic structure in the high-Tc phase induced by pressure in bulk FeSe from magneto-transport measurements and first-principles calculations. With increasing pressure, the low-Tc superconducting phase transforms into high-Tc phase, where we find the normal-state Hall resistivity changes sign from negative to positive, demonstrating dominant hole carriers in striking contrast to other FeSe-derived high-Tc systems. Moreover, the Hall coefficient is remarkably enlarged and the magnetoresistance exhibits anomalous scaling behaviors, evidencing strongly enhanced interband spin fluctuations in the high-Tc phase. These results in FeSe highlight similarities with high-Tc phases of iron pnictides, constituting a step toward a unified understanding of iron-based superconductivity.
  • The pentatellurides, ZrTe5 and HfTe5 are layered compounds with one dimensional transition-metal chains that show a never understood temperature dependent transition in transport properties as well as recently discovered properties suggesting topological semimetallic behavior. Here we show that these materials are semiconductors and that the electronic transition is due to a combination of bipolar effects and different anisotropies for electrons and holes. We report magneto-transport properties for two kinds of ZrTe5 single crystals grown with the chemical vapor transport (S1) and the flux method (S2), respectively. These have distinct transport properties at zero field: the S1 displays a metallic behavior with a pronounced resistance peak and a sudden sign reversal in thermopower at approximately 130 K, consistent with previous observations of the electronic transition; in strikingly contrast, the S2 exhibits a semiconducting-like behavior at low temperatures and a positive thermopower over the whole temperature range. Refinements on the single-crystal X-ray diffraction and the energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis revealed the presence of noticeable Te-vacancies in the sample S1, confirming that the widely observed anomalous transport behaviors in pentatellurides actually take place in the Te-deficient samples. Electronic structure calculations show narrow gap semiconducting behavior, with different transport anisotropies for holes and electrons. For the degenerately doped n-type samples, our transport calculations can result in a resistivity peak and crossover in thermopower from negative to positive at temperatures close to that observed experimentally. Our present work resolves the longstanding puzzle regarding the anomalous transport behaviors of pentatellurides, and also resolves the electronic structure in favor of a semiconducting state.
  • Prior to the superconducting transition at Tc = 2.3 K, Mo3Sb7 undergoes a symmetry-lowering, cubic-to-tetragonal structural transition at Ts = 53 K. We have monitored the pressure dependence of these two transitions by measuring the resistivity of Mo3Sb7 single crystals under various hydrostatic pressures up to 15 GPa. The application of external pressure enhances Tc but suppresses Ts until Pc ~ 10 GPa, above which a pressure-induced first order structural transition takes place and is manifested by the phase coexistence in the pressure range 8 < P < 12 GPa. The cubic phase above 12 GPa is also found to be superconducting with a higher Tc =6 K that decreases slightly with further increasing pressure. The variations with pressure of Tc and Ts satisfy the Bilbro-McMillan equation, i.e. Tc^nTs^(1-n) = constant, thus suggesting the competition of superconductivity with the structural transition that has been proposed to be accompanied with a spin-gap formation at Ts. This scenario is supported by our first-principles calculations which imply the plausible importance of magnetism that competes with the superconductivity in Mo3Sb7.
  • MnP, a superconductor under pressure, exhibits a ferromagnetic order below TC~290 K followed by a helical order with the spins lying in the ab plane and the helical rotation propagating along the c axis below Ts~50 K at ambient pressure. We performed single crystal neutron diffraction experiments to determine the magnetic ground states under pressure. Both TC and Ts are gradually suppressed with increasing pressure and the helical order disappears at ~1.2 GPa. At intermediate pressures of 1.8 and 2.0 GPa, the ferromagnetic order first develops and changes to a conical or two-phase (ferromagnetic and helical) structure with the propagation along the b axis below a characteristic temperature. At 3.8 GPa, a helical magnetic order appears below 208 K, which hosts the spins in the ac plane and the propagation along the b axis. The period of this b axis modulation is shorter than that at 1.8 GPa. Our results indicate that the magnetic phase in the vicinity of the superconducting phase may have a helical magnetic correlation along the b axis.
  • The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (${T_{\rm c}}$) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. More importantly, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of ${T_{\rm c}}$ has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to $\sim9$ GPa, which uncover a hidden magnetic dome superseding the nematic order. Above ${\sim6}$ GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (${T_{\rm c}\le38.3}$ K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order, demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed above the high-${T_{\rm c}}$ phase. The obtained phase diagram highlights unique features among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-${T_{\rm c}}$ cuprates.
  • Magnetism and superconductivity often compete for preeminence as a material's ground state, and in the right circumstances the fluctuating remains of magnetic order can induce superconducting pairing. The intertwining of the two on the microscopic level, independent of lattice excitations, is especially pronounced in heavy fermion compounds, rare earth cuprates, and iron pnictides. Here we point out that for a helical arrangement of localized spins, a variable magnetic pitch length provides a unique tuning process from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic ground state in the long and short wavelength limits, respectively. Such chemical or pressure adjustable helical order naturally provides the possibility for continuous tuning between ferromagnetically and antiferromagnetically mediated superconductivity. At the same time, phonon mediated superconductivity is suppressed because of the local ferromagnetic spin configuration. We employ synchrotron-based magnetic x-ray diffraction techniques to test these ideas in the recently discovered superconductor, MnP. This sensitive probe directly reveals a reduced-moment, helical spin order at high pressure proximate to the superconducting state, with a tightened pitch in comparison to that at ambient pressure where superconductivity is absent. The correlation between magnetic pitch length and superconducting transition temperature in the (Cr/Mn/Fe)(P/As) family suggests a strategy for using spiral magnets as interlocutors for spin fluctuation mediated superconductivity.
  • The high temperature magnetic order in SrRu$_2$O$_6$ was studied by measuring magnetization and neutron powder diffraction with both polarized and unpolarized neutrons. SrRu$_2$O$_6$ crystallizes into the hexagonal lead antimonate (PbSb$_2$O$_6$, space group \textit{P}$\overline{3}$1\textit{m}) structure with layers of edge-sharing RuO$_6$ octahedra separated by Sr$^{2+}$ ions. SrRu$_2$O$_6$ orders at $T_N$=565\,K with Ru moments coupled antiferromagnetically both in-plane and out-of-plane. The magnetic moment is 1.30(2) $\mu_\mathrm{B}$/Ru at room temperature and is along the crystallographic \textit{c}-axis in the G-type magnetic structure. We performed density functional calculations with constrained RPA to obtain the electronic structure and effective intra- and inter-orbital interaction parameters. The projected density of states show strong hybridization between Ru 4$d$ and O 2$p$. By downfolding to the target $t_{2g}$ bands we extracted the effective magnetic Hamiltonian. We performed Monte Carlo simulations to determine the transition temperature as a function of inter- and intra-plane couplings and find weak inter plane coupling, 3\% of the intra-plane coupling, permits three dimensional magnetic order at $T_N$. As suggested by the magnetic susceptibility, two-dimensional correlations persist above $T_N$ due to the strong intra-plane coupling.
  • With current research efforts shifting towards the 4$d$ and 5$d$ transition metal oxides, understanding the evolution of the electronic and magnetic structure as one moves away from 3$d$ materials is of critical importance. Here we perform X-ray spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations on $A$-site ordered perovskites with Cu in the $A$-site and the $B$-sites descending along the 9th group of the periodic table to elucidate the emerging properties as $d$-orbitals change from partially filled 3$d$, 4$d$, to 5$d$. The results show that when descending from Co to Ir the charge transfers from the cuprate like Zhang-Rice state on Cu to the t$_{2g}$ orbital of the B site. As the Cu $d$-orbital occupation approaches the Cu$^{2+}$ limit, a mixed-valence state in CaCu$_3$Rh$_4$O$_{12}$ and heavy fermion state in CaCu$_3$Ir$_4$O$_{12}$ are obtained. The investigated d-electron compounds are mapped onto the Doniach phase diagram of the competing RKKY and Kondo interactions developed for f-electron systems.
  • We report the discovery of superconductivity on the border of long-range magnetic order in the itinerant-electron helimagnet MnP via the application of high pressure. Superconductivity with Tsc~1 K emerges and exists merely near the critical pressure Pc~8 GPa, where the long-range magnetic order just vanishes. The present finding makes MnP the first Mn-based superconductor. The close proximity of superconductivity to a magnetic instability suggests an unconventional pairing mechanism. Moreover, the detailed analysis of the normal-state transport properties evidenced non-Fermi-liquid behavior and the dramatic enhancement of the quasi-particle effective mass near Pc associated with the magnetic quantum fluctuations.
  • Ferromagnetism and its evolution in the orthorhombic perovskite system Sr1-xCaxRuO3 have been widely believed to correlate with the structural distortion. The recent development of high-pressure synthesis of the Ba substituted Sr1-yBayRuO3 makes it possible to study ferromagnetism over a broader phase diagram, which includes new orthorhombic Imma and the cubic phases. However, the chemical substitutions introduce the A-site disorder effect on Tc, which complicates determination of the relationship between ferromagnetism and the structural distortion. By clarifying the site disorder effect on Tc in several new series of ruthenates in which the average bond length <A-O> keeps the same, but the bond-length variance varies, we are able to demonstrate a parabolic curve of Tc versus mean bond length <A-O>. A much higher Tc ~ 177 K than that found in orthorhombic SrRuO3 can be obtained from the curve at a bond length <A-O> which makes the geometric factor t = <A-O>/(sqrt(2)<Ru-O>) = 1. This new result reveals not only that the ferromagnetism in the ruthenates is extremely sensitive to the lattice strain, but also that it has an important implication for exploring the structure-property relationship in a broad range of oxides with perovskite or perovskite-related structure.
  • Recent studies of the high-Tc superconductor La_(1.6-x)Nd_(0.4)Sr_(x)CuO_(4) (Nd-LSCO) have found a linear-T in-plane resistivity rho_(ab) and a logarithmic temperature dependence of the thermopower S / T at a hole doping p = 0.24, and a Fermi-surface reconstruction just below p = 0.24 [1, 2]. These are typical signatures of a quantum critical point (QCP). Here we report data on the c-axis resistivity rho_(c)(T) of Nd-LSCO measured as a function of temperature near this QCP, in a magnetic field large enough to entirely suppress superconductivity. Like rho_(ab), rho_(c) shows an upturn at low temperature, a signature of Fermi surface reconstruction caused by stripe order. Tracking the height of the upturn as it decreases with doping enables us to pin down the precise location of the QCP where stripe order ends, at p* = 0.235 +- 0.005. We propose that the temperature T_(rho) below which the upturn begins marks the onset of the pseudogap phase, found to be roughly twice as high as the stripe ordering temperature in this material.
  • The Nernst effect in metals is highly sensitive to two kinds of phase transition: superconductivity and density-wave order. The large positive Nernst signal observed in hole-doped high-Tc superconductors above their transition temperature Tc has so far been attributed to fluctuating superconductivity. Here we show that in some of these materials the large Nernst signal is in fact caused by stripe order, a form of spin / charge modulation which causes a reconstruction of the Fermi surface. In LSCO doped with Nd or Eu, the onset of stripe order causes the Nernst signal to go from small and negative to large and positive, as revealed either by lowering the hole concentration across the quantum critical point in Nd-LSCO, or lowering the temperature across the ordering temperature in Eu-LSCO. In the latter case, two separate peaks are resolved, respectively associated with the onset of stripe order at high temperature and superconductivity near Tc. This sensitivity to Fermi-surface reconstruction makes the Nernst effect a promising probe of broken symmetry in high-Tc superconductors.