• We present the Data Release 14 Quasar catalog (DR14Q) from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV). This catalog includes all SDSS-IV/eBOSS objects that were spectroscopically targeted as quasar candidates and that are confirmed as quasars via a new automated procedure combined with a partial visual inspection of spectra, have luminosities $M_{\rm i} \left[ z=2 \right] < -20.5$ (in a $\Lambda$CDM cosmology with $H_0 = 70 \ {\rm km \ s^{-1} \ Mpc ^{-1}}$, $\Omega_{\rm M} = 0.3$, and $\Omega_{\rm \Lambda} = 0.7$), and either display at least one emission line with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) larger than $500 \ {\rm km \ s^{-1}}$ or, if not, have interesting/complex absorption features. The catalog also includes previously spectroscopically-confirmed quasars from SDSS-I, II and III. The catalog contains 526,356 quasars 144,046 are new discoveries since the beginning of SDSS-IV) detected over 9,376 deg$^2$ (2,044 deg$^2$ having new spectroscopic data available) with robust identification and redshift measured by a combination of principal component eigenspectra. The catalog is estimated to have about 0.5% contamination. The catalog identifies 21,877 broad absorption line quasars and lists their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents SDSS five-band CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys.
  • We report on the galaxy MACSJ0032-arc at z=3.6314 discovered during the Herschel Lensing snapshot Survey of massive galaxy clusters, and strongly lensed by the cluster MACSJ0032.1+1808. The successful detections of its rest-frame UV, optical, FIR, millimeter, and radio continua, and of its CO emission enable us to characterize, for the first time at such a high redshift, the stellar, dust, and molecular gas properties of a compact star-forming galaxy with a size smaller than 2.5 kpc, a fairly low stellar mass of 4.8x10^9 Msun, and a moderate IR luminosity of 4.8x10^11 Lsun. We find that the bulk of the molecular gas mass and star formation seems to be spatially decoupled from the rest-frame UV emission. About 90% of the total star formation rate is undetected at rest-frame UV wavelengths because of severe obscuration by dust, but is seen through the thermal FIR dust emission and the radio synchrotron radiation. The observed CO(4-3) and CO(6-5) lines demonstrate that high-J transitions, at least up to J=6, remain excited in this galaxy, whose CO spectral line energy distribution resembles that of high-redshift submm galaxies, even though the IR luminosity of MACSJ0032-arc is ten times lower. This high CO excitation is possibly due to the compactness of the galaxy. We find evidence that this high CO excitation has to be considered in the balance when estimating the CO-to-H2 conversion factor. The inferred depletion time of the molecular gas in MACSJ0032-arc supports the decrease in the gas depletion timescale of galaxies with redshift, although to a lesser degree than predicted by galaxy evolution models. Instead, the measured molecular gas fraction as high as 60-79% in MACSJ0032-arc favors the continued increase in the gas fraction of galaxies with redshift as expected, despite the plateau observed between z~1.5 and z~2.5.
  • We describe the algorithm used to select the Emission Line Galaxy (ELG) sample at $z \sim 0.85$ for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV, using photometric data from the DECam Legacy Survey. Our selection is based on a selection box in the $g-r$ vs. $r-z$ colour-colour space and a cut on the $g$-band magnitude, to favour galaxies in the desired redshift range with strong [OII] emission. It provides a target density of 200 deg$^{-2}$ on the North Galactic Cap (NGC) and of 240 deg$^{-2}$ on the South Galactic Cap (SGC), where we use a larger selection box because of deeper imaging. We demonstrate that this selection passes the eBOSS requirements in terms of homogeneity. About 50,000 ELGs have been observed since the observations have started in 2016, September. These roughly match the expected redshift distribution, though the measured efficiency is slightly lower than expected. The efficiency can be increased by enlarging the redshift range and with incoming pipeline improvement. The cosmological forecast based on these first data predict $\sigma_{D_V}/D_V = 0.023$, in agreement with previous forecasts. Lastly, we present the stellar population properties of the ELG SGC sample. Once observations are completed, this sample will be suited to provide a cosmological analysis at $z \sim 0.85$, and will pave the way for the next decade of massive spectroscopic cosmological surveys, which heavily rely on ELGs. The target catalogue over the SGC will be released along with DR14.
  • We present two wide-field catalogs of photometrically-selected emission line galaxies (ELGs) at z=0.8 covering about 2800 deg^2 over the south galactic cap. The catalogs were obtained using a Fisher discriminant technique described in a companion paper. The two catalogs differ by the imaging used to define the Fisher discriminant: the first catalog includes imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, the second also includes information from the South Galactic Cap U-band Sky Survey (SCUSS). Containing respectively 560,045 and 615,601 objects, they represent the largest ELG catalogs available today and were designed for the ELG programme of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS). We study potential sources of systematic variation in the angular distribution of the selected ELGs due to fluctuations of the observational parameters. We model the influence of the observational parameters using a multivariate regression and implement a weighting scheme that allows effective removal of all of the systematic errors induced by the observational parameters. We show that fluctuations in the imaging zero-points of the photometric bands have minor impact on the angular distribution of objects in our catalogs. We compute the angular clustering of both catalogs and show that our weighting procedure effectively removes spurious clustering on large scales. We fit a model to the small scale angular clustering, showing that the selections have similar biases of 1.35/D_a(z) and 1.28/D_a(z). Both catalogs are publicly available.
  • We present a study on galaxy detection and shape classification using topometric clustering algorithms. We first use the DBSCAN algorithm to extract, from CCD frames, groups of adjacent pixels with significant fluxes and we then apply the DENCLUE algorithm to separate the contributions of overlapping sources. The DENCLUE separation is based on the localization of pattern of local maxima, through an iterative algorithm which associates each pixel to the closest local maximum. Our main classification goal is to take apart elliptical from spiral galaxies. We introduce new sets of features derived from the computation of geometrical invariant moments of the pixel group shape and from the statistics of the spatial distribution of the DENCLUE local maxima patterns. Ellipticals are characterized by a single group of local maxima, related to the galaxy core, while spiral galaxies have additional ones related to segments of spiral arms. We use two different supervised ensemble classification algorithms, Random Forest, and Gradient Boosting. Using a sample of ~ 24000 galaxies taken from the Galaxy Zoo 2 main sample with spectroscopic redshifts, and we test our classification against the Galaxy Zoo 2 catalog. We find that features extracted from our pipeline give on average an accuracy of ~ 93%, when testing on a test set with a size of 20% of our full data set, with features deriving from the angular distribution of density attractor ranking at the top of the discrimination power.
  • We present a new strong lensing mass reconstruction of the Bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) at z=0.296, based on WFC3 and ACS HST imaging and VLT/FORS2 spectroscopy. The strong lensing constraints underwent substantial revision compared to previously published analysis, there are now 14 (six new and eight previously known) multiply-imaged systems, of which three have spectroscopically confirmed redshifts (including one newly measured from this work). The reconstructed mass distribution explicitly included the combination of three mass components: i) the intra-cluster gas mass derived from X-ray observation, ii) the cluster galaxies modeled by their fundamental plane scaling relations and iii) dark matter. The model that includes the intra-cluster gas is the one with the best Bayesian evidence. This model has a total RMS value of 0.158" between the predicted and measured image positions for the 14 multiple images considered. The proximity of the total RMS to resolution of HST/WFC3 and ACS (0.07-0.15" FWHM) demonstrates the excellent precision of our mass model. The derived mass model confirms the spatial offset between the X-ray gas and dark matter peaks. The fraction of the galaxy halos mass to total mass is found to be f_s=11+/-5% for a total mass of 2.5+/-0.1 x 10^14 solar mass within a 250 kpc radial aperture.
  • We present an axially symmetric formula to calculate the probability of finding gravitational arcs in galaxy clusters, being induced by their massive dark matter haloes, as a function of clusters redshifts and virial masses. The formula includes the ellipticity of the clusters dark matter potential by using a pseudo-elliptical approximation. The probabilities are calculated and compared for two dark-matter halo profiles, the Navarro, Frenk and White (NFW) and the Non-Singular-Isothermal-Sphere (NSIS). We demonstrate the power of our formulation through a Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test on the strong lensing statistics of an X-ray bright sample of low redshift Abell clusters. This KS test allows to establish limits on the values of the concentration parameter for the NFW profile ($c_\Delta$) and the core radius for the NSIS profile (\rc), which are related to the lowest cluster redshift ($z_{\rm cut}$) where strong arcs can be observed. For NFW dark matter profiles, we infer cluster haloes with concentrations that are consistent to those predicted by $\Lambda$CDM simulations. As for NSIS dark matter profiles, we find only upper limits for the clusters core radii and thus do not rule out a purely SIS model. For alternative mass profiles, our formulation provides constraints through $z_{\rm cut}$ on the parameters that control the concentration of mass in the inner region of the clusters haloes. We find that $z_{\rm cut}$ is expected to lie in the 0.0--0.2 redshift, highlighting the need to include very low-$z$ clusters in samples to study the clusters mass profiles.
  • We present the results of a new search for galaxy-scale strong lensing systems in CFHTLS Wide. Our lens-finding technique involves a preselection of potential lens galaxies, applying simple cuts in size and magnitude. We then perform a Principal Component Analysis of the galaxy images, ensuring a clean removal of the light profile. Lensed features are searched for in the residual images using the clustering topometric algorithm DBSCAN. We find 1098 lens candidates that we inspect visually, leading to a cleaned sample of 109 new lens candidates. Using realistic image simulations we estimate the completeness of our sample and show that it is independent of source surface brightness, Einstein ring size (image separation) or lens redshift. We compare the properties of our sample to previous lens searches in CFHTLS. Including the present search, the total number of lenses found in CFHTLS amounts to 678, which corresponds to ~4 lenses per square degree down to i=24.8. This is equivalent to ~ 60.000 lenses in total in a survey as wide as Euclid, but at the CFHTLS resolution and depth.
  • We report the discovery of a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared galaxy (L_IR~10^13 L_sun) with strong radio emission (L_1.4GHz~10^25 W/Hz) at z=2.553. The source was identified in the citizen science project SpaceWarps through the visual inspection of tens of thousands of iJKs colour composite images of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs), groups and clusters of galaxies and quasars. Appearing as a partial Einstein ring (r_e~3") around an LRG at z=0.2, the galaxy is extremely bright in the sub-millimetre for a cosmological source, with the thermal dust emission approaching 1 Jy at peak. The redshift of the lensed galaxy is determined through the detection of the CO(3-2) molecular emission line with the Large Millimetre Telescope's Redshift Search Receiver and through [OIII] and H-alpha line detections in the near-infrared from Subaru/IRCS. We have resolved the radio emission with high resolution (300-400 mas) eMERLIN L-band and JVLA C-band imaging. These observations are used in combination with the near-infrared imaging to construct a lens model, which indicates a lensing magnification of ~10x. The source reconstruction appears to support a radio morphology comprised of a compact (<250 pc) core and more extended component, perhaps indicative of an active nucleus and jet or lobe.
  • We present a new selection technique of producing spectroscopic target catalogues for massive spectroscopic surveys for cosmology. This work was conducted in the context of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS), which will use ~200 000 emission line galaxies (ELGs) at 0.6<zspec<1.0 to obtain a precise baryon acoustic oscillation measurement. Our proposed selection technique is based on optical and near-infrared broad-band filter photometry. We used a training sample to define a quantity, the Fisher discriminant (linear combination of colours), which correlates best with the desired properties of the target: redshift and [OII] flux. The proposed selections are simply done by applying a cut on magnitudes and this Fisher discriminant. We used public data and dedicated SDSS spectroscopy to quantify the redshift distribution and [OII] flux of our ELG target selections. We demonstrate that two of our selections fulfil the initial eBOSS/ELG redshift requirements: for a target density of 180 deg^2, ~70% of the selected objects have 0.6<zspec<1.0 and only ~1% of those galaxies in the range 0.6<zspec<1.0 are expected to have a catastrophic zspec estimate. Additionally, the stacked spectra and stacked deep images for those two selections show characteristic features of star-forming galaxies. The proposed approach using the Fisher discriminant could, however, be used to efficiently select other galaxy populations, based on multi-band photometry, providing that spectroscopic information is available. This technique could thus be useful for other future massive spectroscopic surveys such as PFS, DESI, and 4MOST.
  • We present a thorough characterization of a large sample of 183 extreme emission-line galaxies (EELGs) at redshift 0.11 < z < 0.93 selected from the 20k zCOSMOS Bright Survey because of their unusually large emission line equivalent widths. We use multiwavelength COSMOS photometry, HST-ACS I-band imaging and optical zCOSMOS spectroscopy to derive the main global properties of EELGs, such as sizes, masses, SFRs, reliable metallicities from both "direct" and "strong-line" methods. The EELGs are compact (R_50 ~ 1.3 kpc), low-mass (log(M*/Msol)~7-10) galaxies forming stars at unusually high specific SFR (log(sSFR/yr) up to ~ -7) compared to main sequence SFGs of the same stellar mass and redshift. At UV wavelengths, the EELGs are luminous and show high surface brightness and include strong Ly$\alpha$ emitters, as revealed by GALEX spectroscopy. We show that zCOSMOS EELGs are high-ionization, low-metallicity systems, with median 12+log(O/H)=8.16, including a handful of extremely metal-deficient galaxies (<10% solar). While ~80% of the EELGs show non-axisymmetric morphologies, including clumpy and tadpole galaxies, we find that ~29% of them show additional low surface-brightness features, which strongly suggest recent or ongoing interactions. As star-forming dwarfs in the local Universe, EELGs are most often found in relative isolation. While only very few EELGs belong to compact groups, almost one third of them are found in spectroscopically confirmed loose pairs or triplets. We conclude that EELGs are galaxies caught in a transient and probably early period of their evolution, where they are efficiently building-up a significant fraction of their present-day stellar mass in an ongoing galaxy-wide starburst. Therefore, the EELGs constitute an ideal benchmark for comparison studies between low- and high-redshift low-mass star-forming galaxies.
  • To extend the molecular gas measurements to typical star-forming galaxies (SFGs) with SFR < 40 Msun yr^{-1} and M* < 2.5x10^{10} Msun at z~1.5-3, we have observed CO emission with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer and 30m telescope for five strongly-lensed galaxies selected from the Herschel Lensing Survey. These observations are combined with a compilation of CO measurements from the literature. We infer the luminosity correction factors r2,1 = 0.81+/-0.20 and r3,1 = 0.57+/-0.15 for the J=2 and J=3 CO transitions, respectively, valid for SFGs at z>1. The combined sample of CO-detected SFGs at z>1 shows a large spread in star formation efficiency (SFE), such that SFE extend beyond the low values of local spirals and overlap the distribution of z>1 sub-mm galaxies. We find that the spread in SFE (or equivalently in molecular gas depletion timescale) is due to primarily the specific star formation rate, but also stellar mass and redshift. Correlations of SFE with the offset from the main-sequence and the compactness of the starburst are less clear. The increase of the molecular gas depletion timescale with M* now revealed by low M* SFGs at z>1 and observed at z=0 is in contrast to the admitted constant molecular gas depletion timescale and the linear Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We confirm an increase of the molecular gas fraction (fgas) from z~0.2 to z~1.2, followed by a very mild increase toward higher redshifts. At each redshift fgas shows a large dispersion due to the dependence of fgas on M*, producing a gradient of increasing fgas with decreasing M*. We provide the first measure of fgas of z>1 SFGs at the low-M* end (10^{9.4} < M*/Msun < 10^{9.9}), reaching a mean fgas = 0.69+/-0.18, which shows a clear fgas upturn. Finally, we find evidence for a non-universal dust-to-gas ratio among high-redshift SFGs and sub-mm galaxies, local spirals and ULIRGs with near-solar metallicities.
  • Using three magnified Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) detected behind CLASH clusters, we perform a first pilot study to see whether standardizable candles can be used to calibrate cluster mass maps created from strong lensing observations. Such calibrations will be crucial when next generation HST cluster surveys (e.g. FRONTIER) provide magnification maps that will, in turn, form the basis for the exploration of the high redshift Universe. We classify SNe using combined photometric and spectroscopic observations, finding two of the three to be clearly of type SN Ia and the third probable. The SNe exhibit significant amplification, up to a factor of 1.7 at $\sim5\sigma$ significance (SN-L2). We conducted this as a blind study to avoid fine tuning of parameters, finding a mean amplification difference between SNe and the cluster lensing models of $0.09 \pm 0.09^{stat} \pm 0.05^{sys}$ mag. This impressive agreement suggests no tension between cluster mass models and high redshift standardized SNe Ia. However, the measured statistical dispersion of $\sigma_{\mu}=0.21$ mag appeared large compared to the dispersion expected based on statistical uncertainties ($0.14$). Further work with the supernova and cluster lensing models, post unblinding, reduced the measured dispersion to $\sigma_{\mu}=0.12$. An explicit choice should thus be made as to whether SNe are used unblinded to improve the model, or blinded to test the model. As the lensed SN samples grow larger, this technique will allow improved constraints on assumptions regarding e.g. the structure of the dark matter halo.
  • We present an algorithm using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to subtract galaxies from imaging data, and also two algorithms to find strong, galaxy-scale gravitational lenses in the resulting residual image. The combined method is optimized to find full or partial Einstein rings. Starting from a pre-selection of potential massive galaxies, we first perform a PCA to build a set of basis vectors. The galaxy images are reconstructed using the PCA basis and subtracted from the data. We then filter the residual image with two different methods. The first uses a curvelet (curved wavelets) filter of the residual images to enhance any curved/ring feature. The resulting image is transformed in polar coordinates, centered on the lens galaxy center. In these coordinates, a ring is turned into a line, allowing us to detect very faint rings by taking advantage of the integrated signal-to-noise in the ring (a line in polar coordinates). The second way of analysing the PCA-subtracted images identifies structures in the residual images and assesses whether they are lensed images according to their orientation, multiplicity and elongation. We apply the two methods to a sample of simulated Einstein rings, as they would be observed with the ESA Euclid satellite in the VIS band. The polar coordinates transform allows us to reach a completeness of 90% and a purity of 86%, as soon as the signal-to-noise integrated in the ring is higher than 30, and almost independent of the size of the Einstein ring. Finally, we show with real data that our PCA-based galaxy subtraction scheme performs better than traditional subtraction based on model fitting to the data. Our algorithm can be developed and improved further using machine learning and dictionary learning methods, which would extend the capabilities of the method to more complex and diverse galaxy shapes.
  • We present in this letter the first analysis of a z~8 galaxy candidate found in the Hubble and Spitzer imaging data of Abell 2744, as part of the Hubble Frontier Fields legacy program. We applied the most commonly-used methods to select exceptionally high-z galaxies by combining non-detection and color-criteria using seven HST bands. We used GALFIT on IRAC images for fitting and subtracting contamination of bright nearby sources. The physical properties have been inferred from SED-fitting using templates with and without nebular emission. This letter is focussed on the brightest candidate we found (m$_{F160W}$=26.2) over the 4.9 arcmin$^2$ field of view covered by the WFC3. It shows a non-detection in the ACS bands and at 3.6{\mu}m whereas it is clearly detected at 4.5{\mu}m with rather similar depths. This break in the IRAC data could be explained by strong [OIII]+H{\beta} lines at z~8 which contribute to the 4.5{\mu}m photometry. The best photo-z is found at z~8.0$^{+0.2}_{-0.5}$, although solutions at low-redshift (z~1.9) cannot be completely excluded, but they are strongly disfavoured by the SED-fitting work. The amplification factor is relatively small at {\mu}=1.49$\pm$0.02. The Star Formation Rate in this object is ranging from 8 to 60 Mo/yr, the stellar mass is in the order of M$_{\star}$=(2.5-10) x 10$^{9}$Mo and the size is r~0.35$\pm$0.15 kpc. This object is one of the first z~8 LBG candidates showing a clear break between 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m which is consistent with the IRAC properties of the first spectroscopically confirmed galaxy at a similar redshift. Due to its brightness, the redshift of this object could potentially be confirmed by near infrared spectroscopy with current 8-10m telescopes. The nature of this candidate will be revealed in the coming months with the arrival of new ACS and Spitzer data, increasing the depth at optical and near-IR wavelengths.
  • We identify 42 candidate groups lying between 1.8<z<3.0 from a sample of 3502 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the zCOSMOS-deep redshift survey within the same redshift interval. These systems contain three to five spectroscopic galaxies that lie within 500kpc in projected distance (in physical space) and within 700km/s in velocity. Based on extensive analysis of mock catalogues that have been generated from the Millennium simulation, we examine the likely nature of these systems at the time of observation, and what they will evolve into down to the present epoch. Although few of the "member" galaxies are likely to reside in the same halo at the epoch we observe them, 50% of the systems will eventually bring them all into the same halo, and almost all (93%) will have at least part of the member galaxies in the same halo by the present epoch. Most of the candidate groups can therefore be described as "proto-groups". An estimate of the overdensities is also consistent with the idea that these systems are being seen at the start of the assembly process. We also examine present-day haloes and ask whether their progenitors would have been seen amongst our candidate groups. For present-day haloes between 10^14-10^15Msun/h, 35% should have appeared amongst our candidate groups, and this would have risen to 70% if our survey had been fully-sampled, so we can conclude that our sample can be taken as representative of a large fraction of such systems. There is a clear excess of massive galaxies above 10^10Msun around the locations of the candidate groups in a large independent COSMOS photo-z sample, but we see no evidence in this latter data for any colour differentiation with respect to the field. This is however consistent with the idea that such differentiation arises in satellite galaxies, as indicated at z<1, if the candidate groups are indeed only starting to be assembled.
  • In the course of our 870um APEX/LABOCA follow up of the Herschel Lensing Survey we have detected a source in AS1063 (RXC J2248.7-4431), that has no counterparts in any of the Herschel PACS/SPIRE bands, it is a Herschel 'drop-out' with S_870/S_500>0.5. The 870um emission is extended and centered on the brightest cluster galaxy suggesting either a multiply imaged background source or substructure in the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) increment due to inhomogeneities in the hot cluster gas of this merging cluster. We discuss both interpretations with emphasis on the putative lensed source. Based on the observed properties and on our lens model we find that this source could be the first SMG with a moderate far infrared luminosity (L_FIR<10^12 L_sol) detected so far at z>4. In deep HST observations we identified a multiply imaged z~6 source and we measured its spectroscopic redshift z=6.107 with VLT/FORS. This source could be associated with the putative SMG but it is most likely offset spatially by 10-30kpc and they could be interacting galaxies. With a FIR luminosity in the range [5-15]x10^{11} L_sol corresponding to a star formation rate in the range [80-260]M_sol/yr, this SMG would be more representative than the extreme starbursts usually detected at z>4. With a total magnification of ~25 it would open a unique window to the 'normal' dusty galaxies at the end of the epoch of reionization.
  • Large sets of objects with spectroscopic redshift measurements will be needed for imaging dark energy experiments to achieve their full potential, serving two goals:_training_, i.e., the use of objects with known redshift to develop and optimize photometric redshift algorithms; and_calibration_, i.e., the characterization of moments of redshift (or photo-z error) distributions. Better training makes cosmological constraints from a given experiment stronger, while highly-accurate calibration is needed for photo-z systematics not to dominate errors. In this white paper, we investigate the required scope of spectroscopic datasets which can serve both these purposes for ongoing and next-generation dark energy experiments, as well as the time required to obtain such data with instruments available in the next decade. Large time allocations on kilo-object spectrographs will be necessary, ideally augmented by infrared spectroscopy from space. Alternatively, precision calibrations could be obtained by measuring cross-correlation statistics using samples of bright objects from a large baryon acoustic oscillation experiment such as DESI. We also summarize the additional work on photometric redshift methods needed to prepare for ongoing and future dark energy experiments.
  • We present the analysis of photometric, spectroscopic, and morphological properties for differently selected samples of passive galaxies up to z=1 extracted from the zCOSMOS-20k spectroscopic survey. This analysis intends to explore the dependence of galaxy properties on the selection criterion adopted, study the degree of contamination due to star-forming outliers, and provide a comparison between different commonly used selection criteria. We extracted from the zCOSMOS-20k catalog six different samples of passive galaxies, based on morphology, optical colors, specific star-formation rate, a best fit to the observed spectral energy distribution, and a criterion that combines morphological, spectroscopic, and photometric information. The morphological sample has the higher percentage of contamination in colors, specific star formation rate and presence of emission lines, while the red & passive ETGs sample is the purest, with properties mostly compatible with no star formation activity; however, it is also the less economic criterion in terms of information used. The best performing among the other criteria are the red SED and the quiescent ones, providing a percentage of contamination only slightly higher than the red & passive ETGs criterion (on average of a factor of ~2) but with absolute values of the properties of contaminants still compatible with a red, passively evolving population. We also provided two revised definitions of early type galaxies based on restframe color-color and color-mass criteria, that better reproduce the observed bimodalities. The analysis of the number densities shows evidences of mass-assembly downsizing, with galaxies at 10.25<log(M/Msun)<10.75 increasing their number by a factor ~2-4 from z=0.6 to z=0.2, by a factor ~2-3 from z=1 to z=0.2 at 10.75<log(M/Msun)<11, and by only ~10-50% from z=1 to z=0.2 at 11<log(M/Msun)<11.5.
  • We have observed four massive galaxy clusters with the SPIRE instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory and measure a deficit of surface brightness within their central region after subtracting sources. We simulate the effects of instrumental sensitivity and resolution, the source population, and the lensing effect of the clusters to estimate the shape and amplitude of the deficit. The amplitude of the central deficit is a strong function of the surface density and flux distribution of the background sources. We find that for the current best fitting faint end number counts, and excellent lensing models, the most likely amplitude of the central deficit is the full intensity of the cosmic infrared background (CIB). Our measurement leads to a lower limit to the integrated total intensity of the CIB of I(250 microns) > 0.69_(-0.03)^(+0.03) (stat.)_(-0.06)^(+0.11) (sys.) MJy/sr, with more CIB possible from both low-redshift sources and from sources within the target clusters. It should be possible to observe this effect in existing high angular resolution data at other wavelengths where the CIB is bright, which would allow tests of models of the faint source component of the CIB.
  • We explore the role of environment in the evolution of galaxies over 0.1<z<0.7 using the final zCOSMOS-bright data set. Using the red fraction of galaxies as a proxy for the quenched population, we find that the fraction of red galaxies increases with the environmental overdensity and with the stellar mass, consistent with previous works. As at lower redshift, the red fraction appears to be separable in mass and environment, suggesting the action of two processes: mass and environmental quenching. The parameters describing these appear to be essentially the same at z~0.7 as locally. We explore the relation between red fraction, mass and environment also for the central and satellite galaxies separately, paying close attention to the effects of impurities in the central-satellite classification and using carefully constructed samples matched in stellar mass. There is little evidence for a dependence of the red fraction of centrals on overdensity. Satellites are consistently redder at all overdensities, and the satellite quenching efficiency increases with overdensity at 0.1<z<0.4. This is less marked at higher redshift, but both are nevertheless consistent with the equivalent local measurements. At a given stellar mass, the fraction of galaxies that are satellites also increases with the overdensity. At a given overdensity and mass, the obtained relation between the environmental quenching and the satellite fraction agrees well with the satellite quenching efficiency, demonstrating that the environmental quenching in the overall population is consistent with being entirely produced through the satellite quenching process at least up to z=0.7. However, despite the unprecedented size of our high redshift samples, the associated statistical uncertainties are still significant and our statements should be understood as approximations to physical reality, rather than physically exact formulae.
  • Panchromatic observations of the best candidate HyLIRG from the widest Herschel extragalactic imaging survey have led to the discovery of at least four intrinsically luminous z=2.41 galaxies across a ~100-kpc region - a cluster of starbursting proto-ellipticals. Via sub-arcsecond interferometric imaging we have measured accurate gas and star-formation surface densities. The two brightest galaxies span ~3 kpc FWHM in submm/radio continuum and CO J=4-3, and double that in CO J=1-0. The broad CO line is due partly to the multitude of constituent galaxies and partly to large rotational velocities in two counter-rotating gas disks -- a scenario predicted to lead to the most intense starbursts, which will therefore come in pairs. The disks have M(dyn) of several x 10^11 Msun, and gas fractions of ~40%. Velocity dispersions are modest so the disks are unstable, potentially on scales commensurate with their radii: these galaxies are undergoing extreme bursts of star formation, not confined to their nuclei, at close to the Eddington limit. Their specific star-formation rates place them ~>5x above the main sequence, which supposedly comprises large gas disks like these. Their high star-formation efficiencies are difficult to reconcile with a simple volumetric star-formation law. N-body and dark matter simulations suggest this system is the progenitor of a B(inary)-type ~10^14.6-Msun cluster.
  • We examine the red fraction of central and satellite galaxies in the large zCOSMOS group catalog out to z ~ 0.8 correcting for both the incompleteness in stellar mass and for the less than perfect purities of the central and satellite samples. We show that, at all masses and at all redshifts, the fraction of satellite galaxies that have been quenched, i.e., are red, is systematically higher than that of centrals, as seen locally in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The satellite quenching efficiency, which is the probability that a satellite is quenched because it is a satellite rather than a central, is, as locally, independent of stellar mass. Furthermore, the average value is about 0.5, which is also very similar to that seen in the SDSS. We also construct the mass functions of blue and red centrals and satellites and show that these broadly follow the predictions of the Peng et al. analysis of the SDSS groups. Together, these results indicate that the effect of the group environment in quenching satellite galaxies was very similar when the universe was about a half its present age, as it is today.
  • The Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the power spectrum of galaxies can be used as a standard ruler to probe the accelerated expansion of the Universe. In this paper, we study several galaxy selection schemes aiming at building an emission-line galaxy (ELG) sample in the redshift range $0.6 < z < 1.7$, that would be suitable for future BAO studies using the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectrograph on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) telescope. We explore two different color selections using both the SDSS and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) photometry in the $u, g, r, i$ bands and evaluate their performance for selecting bright ELG. This study confirms the feasibility of massive ELG surveys using the BOSS spectrographs on the SDSS telescope for a BAO detection at redshift $z\sim1$, in particular for the proposed eBOSS experiment.
  • We investigate the link between AGN activity, star-formation and stellar mass of the host galaxy at 0<z<1, looking for spectroscopic traces of AGN and aging of the host. This work provides an extension of the existing studies at z<0.1 and contributes to shed light on galaxy evolution at intermediate redshifts. We used the zCOSMOS 20k data to create a sample of galaxies at z<1. We divided the sample in several mass-redshift bins to obtain stacked galaxy spectra with an improved S/N. We exploited emission-line diagnostic diagrams to separate AGN from star-forming galaxies. We found indication of a role for the total galaxy stellar mass in leading galaxy classification. Stacked spectra show AGN signatures above the log M_*/M_sun>10.2 threshold. Moreover, the stellar populations of AGN hosts are found to be older with respect to star-forming and composites galaxies. This could be due to the the tendency of AGN to reside in massive hosts. The dependence of the AGN classification on the stellar mass is in agreement with what has been already found in previous studies. It is consistent with, together with the evidence of older stellar populations inhabiting the AGN-like galaxies, the downsizing scenario. In particular, our evidence points to an evolutionary scenario where the AGN-feedback is capable of quenching the star formation in the most massive galaxies. Therefore, the AGN-feedback is the best candidate for initiating the passive evolutionary phase of galaxies.