• Who was Ulugh Beg? A prince who governed a province in the central Asian empire built by his grandfather Tamerlane. Above all, he was a scholar who founded the Samarkand astronomical observatory, whose work predated that of the best astronomers in Europe one and a half centuries later.
  • From the geocentric, closed world model of Antiquity to the wraparound universe models of relativistic cosmology, the parallel history of space representations in science and art illustrates the fundamental role of geometric imagination in innovative findings. Through the analysis of works of various artists and scientists like Plato, Durer, Kepler, Escher, Grisey or the present author, it is shown how the process of creation in science and in the arts rests on aesthetical principles such as symmetry, regular polyhedra, laws of harmonic proportion, tessellations, group theory, etc., as well as beauty, conciseness and emotional approach of the world.
  • The twin paradox is the best known thought experiment associated with Einstein's theory of relativity. An astronaut who makes a journey into space in a high-speed rocket will return home to find he has aged less than a twin who stayed on Earth. This result appears puzzling, since the situation seems symmetrical, as the homebody twin can be considered to have done the travelling with respect to the traveller. Hence it is called a "paradox". In fact, there is no contradiction and the apparent paradox has a simple resolution in Special Relativity with infinite flat space. In General Relativity (dealing with gravitational fields and curved space-time), or in a compact space such as the hypersphere or a multiply connected finite space, the paradox is more complicated, but its resolution provides new insights about the structure of spacetime and the limitations of the equivalence between inertial reference frames.
  • Aims: We investigate the stellar pancake mechanism during which a solar-type star is tidally flattened within its orbital plane passing close to a 10^6 solar masses black hole. We simulate the relativistic orthogonal compression process and follow the associated shock waves formation. Methods: We consider a one-dimensional hydrodynamical stellar model moving in the relativistic gravitational field of a non-rotating black hole. The model is numerically solved using a Godunov-type shock-capturing source-splitting method in order to correctly reproduce the shock waves profiles. Results: Simulations confirm that the space-time curvature can induce several successive orthogonal compressions of the star which give rise to several strong shock waves. The shock waves finally escape from the star and repeatedly heat up the stellar surface to high energy values. Such a shock-heating could interestingly provide a direct observational signature of strongly disruptive star - black hole encounters through the emission of hard X or soft gamma-ray bursts. Timescales and energies of such a process are consistent with some observed events such as GRB 970815.
  • The full three-year WMAP results (WMAP3) reinforce the absence of large-angle correlations at scales greater than 60 degrees. The Poincare dodecahedral space (PDS) model model, which may naturally explain such features, thus remains a plausible cosmological model, despite recent controversy about whether matched circle searches would or would not push the topology beyond the horizon. Here, we have used new eigenmode calculations of the dodecahedral space to predict the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuations in such models, with an improved angular resolution. We have simulated CMB maps and confirmed the expected presence of matching circles. For a set of plausible cosmological parameters, we have derived the angular power spectrum of the CMB up to large wavenumbers. Comparison with the WMAP3 observations confirms a remarkable fit with a PDS model, for a value $\Omega_0 = 1.018$ of the average total energy density.
  • Cosmology's standard model posits an infinite flat universe forever expanding under the pressure of dark energy. First-year data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) confirm this model to spectacular precision on all but the largest scales (Bennett {\it et al.}, 2003 ; Spergel {\it et al.}, 2003). Temperature correlations across the microwave sky match expectations on scales narrower than $60^{\circ}$, yet vanish on scales wider than $60^{\circ}$. Researchers are now seeking an explanation of the missing wide-angle correlations (Contaldi {\it et al.}, 2003 ; Cline {\it et al.}, 2003). One natural approach questions the underlying geometry of space, namely its curvature (Efstathiou, 2003) and its topology (Tegmark {\it et al.}, 2003). In an infinite flat space, waves from the big bang would fill the universe on all length scales. The observed lack of temperature correlations on scales beyond $60^{\circ}$ means the broadest waves are missing, perhaps because space itself is not big enough to support them. Here we present a simple geometrical model of a finite, positively curved space -- the Poincar\'e dodecahedral space -- which accounts for WMAP's observations with no fine-tuning required. Circle searching (Cornish, Spergel and Starkman, 1998) may confirm the model's topological predictions, while upcoming Planck Surveyor data may confirm its predicted density of $\Omega_0 \simeq 1.013 > 1$. If confirmed, the model will answer the ancient question of whether space is finite or infinite, while retaining the standard Friedmann-Lema\^\i{}tre foundation for local physics.