• The deep, wide-area (~800-900 arcmin**2) near-infrared/WFC3/IR + Spitzer/IRAC observations over the CANDELS fields have been a remarkable resource for constraining the bright end of high redshift UV luminosity functions (LFs). However, the lack of HST 1.05-micron observations over the CANDELS fields has made it difficult to identify z~9-10 sources robustly, since such data are needed to confirm the presence of an abrupt Lyman break at 1.2 microns. We report here on the successful identification of many such z~9-10 sources from a new HST program (z9-CANDELS) that targets the highest-probability z~9-10 galaxy candidates with observations at 1.05 microns, to search for a robust Lyman-break at 1.2 microns. The potential z~9-10 candidates are preselected from the full HST, Spitzer/IRAC S-CANDELS observations, and the deepest-available ground-based optical+near-infrared observations. We identified 15 credible z~9-10 galaxies over the CANDELS fields. Nine of these galaxies lie at z~9 and 5 are new identifications. Our targeted follow-up strategy has proven to be very efficient in making use of scarce HST time to secure a reliable sample of z~9-10 galaxies. Through extensive simulations, we replicate the selection process for our sample (both the preselection and follow-up) and use it to improve current estimates for the volume density of bright z~9 and z~10 galaxies. The volume densities we find are 5(-2)(+3)x and 8(-3)(+9)x lower, respectively, than found at z~8. When compared with the best-fit evolution (i.e., dlog_{10} rho(UV)/dz=-0.29+/-0.02) in the UV luminosities densities from z~8 to z~4 integrated to 0.3L*(z=3) (-20 mag), these luminosity densities are 2.6(-0.9)(+1.5)x and 2.2(-1.1)(+2.0)x lower, respectively, than the extrapolated trends. Our new results are broadly consistent with the "accelerated evolution" scenario at z>8, as seen in many theoretical models.
  • We introduce a new color-selection technique to identify high-redshift, massive galaxies that are systematically missed by Lyman-break selection. The new selection is based on the H_{160} and IRAC 4.5um bands, specifically H - [4.5] > 2.25 mag. These galaxies, dubbed "HIEROs", include two major populations that can be separated with an additional J - H color. The populations are massive and dusty star-forming galaxies at z > 3 (JH-blue) and extremely dusty galaxies at z < 3 (JH-red). The 350 arcmin^2 of the GOODS-N and GOODS-S fields with the deepest HST/WFC3 and IRAC data contain 285 HIEROs down to [4.5] < 24 mag. We focus here primarily on JH-blue (z > 3) HIEROs, which have a median photometric redshift z ~4.4 and stellar massM_{*}~10^{10.6} Msun, and are much fainter in the rest-frame UV than similarly massive Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). Their star formation rates (SFRs) reaches ~240 Msun yr^{-1} leading to a specific SFR, sSFR ~4.2 Gyr^{-1}, suggesting that the sSFRs for massive galaxies continue to grow at z > 2 but at a lower growth rate than from z=0 to z=2. With a median half-light radius of 2 kpc, including ~20% as compact as quiescent galaxies at similar redshifts, JH-blue HIEROs represent perfect star-forming progenitors of the most massive (M_{*} > 10^{11.2} Msun) compact quiescent galaxies at z ~ 3 and have the right number density. HIEROs make up ~60% of all galaxies with M_{*} > 10^{10.5} Msun identified at z > 3 from their photometric redshifts. This is five times more than LBGs with nearly no overlap between the two populations. While HIEROs make up 15-25% of the total SFR density at z ~ 4-5, they completely dominate the SFR density taking place in M_{*} >10^{10.5} Msun galaxies, and are therefore crucial to understanding the very early phase of massive galaxy formation.
  • The Spitzer-Cosmic Assembly Deep Near-Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (S-CANDELS; PI G. Fazio) is a Cycle 8 Exploration Program designed to detect galaxies at very high redshifts (z > 5). To mitigate the effects of cosmic variance and also to take advantage of deep coextensive coverage in multiple bands by the Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury Program CANDELS, S-CANDELS was carried out within five widely separated extragalactic fields: the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, COSMOS, the HST Deep Field North, and the Extended Groth Strip. S-CANDELS builds upon the existing coverage of these fields from the Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) by increasing the integration time from 12 hours to a total of 50 hours but within a smaller area, 0.16 square degrees. The additional depth significantly increases the survey completeness at faint magnitudes. This paper describes the S-CANDELS survey design, processing, and publicly-available data products. We present IRAC dual-band 3.6+4.5 micron catalogs reaching to a depth of 26.5 AB mag. Deep IRAC counts for the roughly 135,000 galaxies detected by S-CANDELS are consistent with models based on known galaxy populations. The increase in depth beyond earlier Spitzer/IRAC surveys does not reveal a significant additional contribution from discrete sources to the diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB). Thus it remains true that only roughly half of the estimated CIB flux from COBE/DIRBE is resolved.
  • We present the results of deep \chandra\ imaging of the central region of the Extended Groth Strip, the AEGIS-X Deep (AEGIS-XD) survey. When combined with previous \chandra\ observations of a wider area of the strip, AEGIS-X Wide (AEGIS-XW; Laird et~al. 2009), these provide data to a nominal exposure depth of 800ks in the three central ACIS-I fields, a region of approximately $0.29$~deg$^{2}$. This is currently the third deepest X-ray survey in existence, a factor $\sim 2-3$ shallower than the Chandra Deep Fields (CDFs) but over an area $\sim 3$ times greater than each CDF. We present a catalogue of 937 point sources detected in the deep \chandra\ observations. We present identifications of our X-ray sources from deep ground-based, Spitzer, GALEX and HST imaging. Using a likelihood ratio analysis, we associate multi band counterparts for 929/937 of our X-ray sources, with an estimated 95~\% reliability, making the identification completeness approximately 94~\% in a statistical sense. Reliable spectroscopic redshifts for 353 of our X-ray sources are provided predominantly from Keck (DEEP2/3) and MMT Hectospec, so the current spectroscopic completeness is $\sim 38$~per cent. For the remainder of the X-ray sources, we compute photometric redshifts based on multi-band photometry in up to 35 bands from the UV to mid-IR. Particular attention is given to the fact that the vast majority the X-ray sources are AGN and require hybrid templates. Our photometric redshifts have mean accuracy of $\sigma=0.04$ and an outlier fraction of approximately 5\%, reaching $\sigma=0.03$ with less than 4\% outliers in the area covered by CANDELS . The X-ray, multi-wavelength photometry and redshift catalogues are made publicly available.
  • One of the most challenging aspects of studying galaxies in the z>~7 universe is the infrequent confirmation of their redshifts through spectroscopy, a phenomenon thought to occur from the increasing opacity of the intergalactic medium to Lya photons at z>6.5. The resulting redshift uncertainties inhibit the efficient search for [C II] in z~7 galaxies with sub-mm instruments such as ALMA, given their limited scan speed for faint lines. One means by which to improve the precision of the inferred redshifts is to exploit the potential impact of strong nebular emission lines on the colors of z~4-8 galaxies as observed by Spitzer/IRAC. At z~6.8, galaxies exhibit IRAC colors as blue as [3.6]-[4.5] ~-1, likely due to the contribution of [O III]+Hb to the 3.6 mum flux combined with the absence of line contamination in the 4.5 mum band. In this paper we explore the use of extremely blue [3.6]-[4.5] colors to identify galaxies in the narrow redshift window z~6.6-6.9. When combined with an I-dropout criterion, we demonstrate that we can plausibly select a relatively clean sample of z~6.8 galaxies. Through a systematic application of this selection technique to our catalogs from all five CANDELS fields, we identify 20 probable z~6.6-6.9 galaxies. We estimate that our criteria select the ~50% strongest line emitters at z~6.8 and from the IRAC colors we estimate a typical [O III]+Hb rest-frame equivalent width of 1085A for this sample. The small redshift uncertainties on our sample make it particularly well suited for follow-up studies with facilities such as ALMA.
  • We present a study of the infrared properties for a sample of seven spectroscopically confirmed submillimeter galaxies at $z>$4.0. By combining ground-based near-infrared, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, Herschel SPIRE, and ground-based submillimeter/millimeter photometry, we construct their Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) and a composite model to fit the SEDs. The model includes a stellar emission component at $\lambda_{\rm rest} <$ 3.5$ \mu$m; a hot dust component peaking at $\lambda_{rest} \sim$ 5$\,\mu$m; and cold dust component which becomes significant for $\lambda_{\rm rest} >$ 50$\,\mu$m. Six objects in the sample are detected at 250 and 350$ \mu$m. The dust temperatures for the sources in this sample are in the range of 40$-$80 K, and their $L_{\rm FIR}$ $\sim$ 10$^{13}$ L$_{\odot}$ qualifies them as Hyper$-$Luminous Infrared Galaxies (HyperLIRGs). The mean FIR-radio index for this sample is around $< q > = 2.2$ indicating no radio excess in their radio emission. Most sources in the sample have 24$ \mu$m detections corresponding to a rest-frame 4.5$ \mu$m luminosity of Log$_{10}$(L$_{4.5}$ / L$_{\odot}$) = 11 $\sim$ 11.5. Their L$_{\rm 4.5}$/$L_{\rm FIR}$ ratios are very similar to those of starburst dominated submillimeter galaxies at $z \sim$ 2. The $L_{\rm CO}-L_{\rm FIR}$ relation for this sample is consistent with that determined for local ULIRGs and SMGs at $z \sim$ 2. We conclude that submillimeter galaxies at $z >$ 4 are hotter and more luminous in the FIR, but otherwise very similar to those at $z \sim$ 2. None of these sources show any sign of the strong QSO phase being triggered.
  • Out of several dozen z > 7 candidate galaxies observed spectroscopically, only five have been confirmed via Lyman-alpha emission, at z=7.008, 7.045, 7.109, 7.213 and 7.215. The small fraction of confirmed galaxies may indicate that the neutral fraction in the intergalactic medium (IGM) rises quickly at z > 6.5, as Lyman-alpha is resonantly scattered by neutral gas. However, the small samples and limited depth of previous observations makes these conclusions tentative. Here we report the results of a deep near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 43 z > 6.5 galaxies. We detect only a single galaxy, confirming that some process is making Lyman-alpha difficult to detect. The detected emission line at 1.0343 um is likely to be Lyman-alpha emission, placing this galaxy at a redshift z = 7.51, an epoch 700 million years after the Big Bang. This galaxy's colors are consistent with significant metal content, implying that galaxies become enriched rapidly. We measure a surprisingly high star formation rate of 330 Msol/yr, more than a factor of 100 greater than seen in the Milky Way. Such a galaxy is unexpected in a survey of our size, suggesting that the early universe may harbor more intense sites of star-formation than expected.
  • The properties of K-band selected galaxies (K_AB<24) in the z = 3.09 SSA22 protocluster field are studied. 430 galaxies at 2.6 < z_phot < 3.6 are selected as potential protocluster members in a 112 arcmin^2 area based on their photometric redshifts. We find that \approx 20% of the massive galaxies with stellar masses >10^11 M_sun at z_phot \sim 3.1 have colors consistent with those of quiescent galaxies with ages > 0.5 Gyr. This fraction increases to \approx 50% after correcting for unrelated foreground/background objects. We also find that 30% of the massive galaxies are heavily reddened dusty star-forming galaxies. Few such quiescent galaxies at similar redshifts are seen in typical survey fields. An excess surface density of 24\mu m sources at z_phot \sim 3.1 is also observed, implying the presence of dusty star-formation activity in the protocluster. Cross-correlation with the X-ray data indicates that the fraction of K-band selected protocluster galaxies hosting active galactic nuclei (AGN) is also high compared with the field. The sky distribution of the quiescent galaxies, the 24\mu m sources, and the X-ray AGNs show clustering around a density peak of z=3.1 Ly\alpha emitters (LAEs). A significant fraction of the massive galaxies have already become quiescent, while the dusty star-formation is still active in the SSA22 protocluster. These findings indicate that we are witnessing the formation epoch of massive early-type galaxies at the center of predecessors to present-day rich galaxy clusters.
  • We present a multi-wavelength study of a 3.6 $\mu$m-selected galaxy sample in the Extended Groth strip. The sample is complete for galaxies with stellar mass $>10^{9.5}$ \Msun and redshift $0.4<z<1.2$. In this redshift range, the IRAC 3.6 $\mu$m band measures the rest-frame near-infrared band, permitting nearly unbiased selection with respect to both quiescent and star-forming galaxies. The numerous spectroscopic redshifts available in the EGS are used to train an Artificial Neural Network to estimate photometric redshifts. The distribution of photometric redshift errors is Gaussian with standard deviation ${\sim}0.025(1+z)$, and the fraction of redshift failures (${>}3\sigma$ errors) is about 3.5%. A new method of validation based on pair statistics confirms the estimate of standard deviation even for galaxies lacking spectroscopic redshifts. Basic galaxy properties measured include rest-frame $U-B$ colors, $B$- and $K$-band absolute magnitudes, and stellar masses. We divide the sample into quiescent and star-forming galaxies according to their rest-frame $U-B$ colors and 24 to 3.6 \micron\ flux density ratios and derive rest $K$-band luminosity functions and stellar mass functions for quiescent, star forming, and all galaxies. The results show that massive, quiescent galaxies were in place by $z\approx1$, but lower mass galaxies generally ceased their star formation at later epochs.
  • The shutdown of star formation in galaxies is generally termed `quenching'. Although quenching may occur through a variety of processes, the exact mechanism(s) that is in fact responsible for quenching is still in question. This paper addresses quenching by searching for traces of possible quenching processes through their effects on galaxy structural parameters such as surface stellar mass density and Sersic index (n). We analyze the rest-frame U-B color correlations versus these structural parameters using a sample of galaxies in the redshift range 0.5< z<0.8 from the DEEP2/AEGIS survey. We find that Sersic index (n) has the smallest overlap region among all tested parameters and resembles a step-function with a threshold value of n=2.3. There exists, however, a significant population of outliers with blue colors yet high n values that seem to contradict this behavior. We hypothesize that their Sersic values may be distorted by bursts of star formation, AGNs, and/or poor fits, leading us to consider central surface stellar mass density as an alternative to Sersic index. Not only does it correct the outliers, it also forms a tight relationship with color, suggesting that the innermost structure of galaxies is most physically linked with quenching. Furthermore, at z~0.65, the majority of the blue cloud galaxies cannot simply fade onto the red sequence since their GIM2D bulge masses are only half as large on average as the bulge masses of similar red sequence galaxies, thus demonstrating that stellar mass must absolutely increase at the centers of galaxies as they quench. We discuss a two-stage model for quenching in which galaxy star formation rates are controlled by their dark halos while they are still in the blue cloud and a second quenching process sets in later, associated with the central stellar mass build-up.
  • We present the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS), an 18 square degrees medium-deep survey at 3.6 and 4.5 microns with the post-cryogenic Spitzer Space Telescope to ~2 microJy (AB=23.1) depth of five highly observed astronomical fields (ELAIS-N1, ELAIS-S1, Lockman Hole, Chandra Deep Field South and XMM-LSS). SERVS is designed to enable the study of galaxy evolution as a function of environment from z~5 to the present day, and is the first extragalactic survey both large enough and deep enough to put rare objects such as luminous quasars and galaxy clusters at z>1 into their cosmological context. SERVS is designed to overlap with several key surveys at optical, near- through far-infrared, submillimeter and radio wavelengths to provide an unprecedented view of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies. In this paper, we discuss the SERVS survey design, the data processing flow from image reduction and mosaicing to catalogs, as well as coverage of ancillary data from other surveys in the SERVS fields. We also highlight a variety of early science results from the survey.
  • Infrared 3.6 to 8 micron images of the Extended Groth Strip yield plausible counterpart identifications for all but one of 510 radio sources in the AEGIS20 S(1.4 GHz) > 50 micro-Jy sample. This is the first such deep sample that has been effectively 100% identified. Achieving the same identification rate at R-band would require observations reaching R_AB > 27. Spectroscopic redshifts are available for 46% of the sample and photometric redshifts for an additional 47%. Almost all of the sources with 3.6 micron AB magnitudes brighter than 19 have spectroscopic redshifts z < 1.1, while fainter objects predominantly have photometric redshifts with 1 \lapprox z \lapprox 3. Unlike more powerful radio sources that are hosted by galaxies having large stellar masses within a relatively narrow range, the AEGIS20 counterparts have stellar masses spanning more than a factor of 10 at z \sim 1. The sources are roughly 10--15% starbursts at z \lapprox 0.5 and 20--25% AGNs mostly at z > 1 with the remainder of uncertain nature.
  • Two-pulse correlation is employed to investigate the temporal dynamics of both two-photon photoluminescence (2PPL) and four-photon photoluminescence (4PPL) in resonant and nonresonant nanoantennas excited at a wavelength of 800 nm. Our data are consistent with the same two-step model being the cause of both 4PPL and 2PPL, implying that the first excitation step in 4PPL is a three-photon sp->sp direct interband transition. Considering energy and parity conservation, we also explain why 4PPL behavior is favored over three-and five-photon photoluminescence in the power range below the damage threshold of our antennas. Since sizeable 4PPL requires larger peak intensities of the local field, we are able to select either 2PPL or 4PPL in the same gold nanoantennas by choosing a suitable laser pulse duration. We thus provide a first consistent model for the understanding of multiphoton photoluminescence generation in gold nanoantennas, opening new perspectives for applications ranging from the characterization of plasmonic resonances to biomedical imaging.
  • We report detection of four IRAC sources in the GOODS-South field with an extremely red color of H$-$[3.6]$>$4.5. The four sources are not detected in the deep HST WFC3 H-band image with H$_{limit}$=28.3 mag. We find that only 3 types of SED templates can produce such a red H$-$[3.6] color: a very dusty SED with the Calzetti extinction of A$_V$=16 mag at z=0.8; a very dusty SED with the SMC extinction of A$_V$=8 mag at z=2.0$\sim$2.2; and an 1Gyr SSP with A$_V \sim$0.8 at z=5.7. We argue that these sources are unlikely dusty galaxies at z$\leq$2.2 based on absent strong MIPS 24$\mu$m emission. The old stellar population model at z$>$4.5 remains a possible solution for the 4 sources. At z$>$4.5, these sources have stellar masses of Log(M$_*$/M$_{\odot}$)=10.6$\sim$11.2. One source, ERS-1, is also a type-II X-ray QSO with L$_{2-8keV}$=1.6$\times 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. One of the four sources is an X-ray QSO and another one is a HyperLIRG, suggesting a galaxy-merging scenario for the formation of these massive galaxies at high redshifts.
  • Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS) radio sources have been successfully used to select powerful radio sources at high redshifts (z>~2). Typically restricted to large-sky surveys and relatively bright radio flux densities, it has gradually become possible to extend the USS search to sub-mJy levels, thanks to the recent appearance of sensitive low-frequency radio facilities. Here a first detailed analysis of the nature of the faintest USS sources is presented. By using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Very Large Array radio observations of the Lockman Hole at 610 MHz and 1.4 GHz, a sample of 58 USS sources, with 610 MHz integrated fluxes above 100 microJy, is assembled. Deep infrared data at 3.6 and 4.5 micron from the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS) is used to reliably identify counterparts for 48 (83%) of these sources, showing an average total magnitude of [3.6](AB)=19.8 mag. Spectroscopic redshifts for 14 USS sources, together with photometric redshift estimates, improved by the use of the deep SERVS data, for a further 19 objects, show redshifts ranging from z=0.1 to z=2.8, peaking at z~0.6 and tailing off at high redshifts. The remaining 25 USS sources, with no redshift estimate, include the faintest [3.6] magnitudes, with 10 sources undetected at 3.6 and 4.5 micron (typically [3.6]>22-23 mag, from local measurements), which suggests the likely existence of higher redshifts among the sub-mJy USS population. The comparison with the Square Kilometre Array Design Studies Simulated Skies models indicate that Fanaroff-Riley type I radio sources and radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei may constitute the bulk of the faintest USS population, and raises the possibility that the high efficiency of the USS technique for the selection of high redshift sources remains even at the sub-mJy level.
  • We present first results of a study of the submillimetre (rest frame far-infrared) properties of z~3 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) and their lower-redshift counterparts BX/BM galaxies, based on Herschel-SPIRE observations of the Northern field of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS-N). We use stacking analysis to determine the properties of LBGs well below the current limit of the survey. Although LBGs are not detected individually, stacking the infrared luminous LBGs (those detected with Spitzer at 24 microns yields a statistically significant submm detection with mean flux <S_{250}>= 5.9+/-1.4 mJy confirming the power of SPIRE in detecting UV-selected high-redshift galaxies at submillimetre wavelengths. In comparison, the Spitzer 24 microns detected BX/BM galaxies appear fainter with a stacked value of <S_{250}> = 2.7 +/-0.8 mJy. By fitting the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) we derive median infrared luminosities, L_{IR}, of 2.8x10^{12} Lsun and 1.5x10^{11} Lsun for z~3 LBGs and BX/BMs, respectively. We find that $L_{IR} estimates derived from present measurements are in good agreement with those based on UV data for z~2 BX/BM galaxies, unlike the case for z~3 infrared luminous LBGs where the UV underestimates the true $L_{IR}. Although sample selection effects may influence this result we suggest that differences in physical properties (such as morphologies, dust distribution and extent of star-forming regions) between z ~3 LBGs and z~2 BX/BMs may also play a significant role.
  • We present first insights into the far-IR properties for a sample of IRAC and MIPS-24um detected Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z ~ 3, as derived from observations in the northern field of the Great Observatories Origins Survey (GOODS-N) carried out with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. Although none of our galaxies are detected by Herschel, we employ a stacking technique to construct, for the first time, the average spectral energy distribution of infrared luminous LBGs from UV to radio wavelengths. We derive a median IR luminosity of L_{IR} = 1.6 x 10^12 Lo, placing the population in the class of ultra luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). Complementing our study with existing multi-wavelength data, we put constraints on the dust temperature of the population and find that for their L_{IR}, MIPS-LBGs are warmer than submm-luminous galaxies while they fall in the locus of the L_{IR}-T_{d} relation of the local ULIRGs. This, along with estimates based on the average SED, explains the marginal detection of LBGs in current sub-mm surveys and suggests that these latter studies introduce a bias towards the detection of colder ULIRGs in the high-z universe, while missing high-z ULIRGS with warmer dust.
  • We present high-resolution 345 GHz interferometric observations of two extreme luminous (L_{IR}>10^{13} L_sun), submillimetre-selected galaxies (SMGs) in the COSMOS field with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). Both targets were previously detected as unresolved point-sources by the SMA in its compact configuration, also at 345 GHz. These new data, which provide a factor of ~3 improvement in resolution, allow us to measure the physical scale of the far-infrared in the submillimetre directly. The visibility functions of both targets show significant evidence for structure on 0.5-1 arcsec scales, which at z=1.5 translates into a physical scale of 5-8 kpc. Our results are consistent with the angular and physical scales of two comparably luminous objects with high-resolution SMA followup, as well as radio continuum and CO sizes. These relatively compact sizes (<5-10 kpc) argue strongly for merger-driven starbursts, rather than extended gas-rich disks, as the preferred channel for forming SMGs. For the most luminous objects, the derived sizes may also have important physical consequences; under a series of simplifying assumptions, we find that these two objects in particular are forming stars close to or at the Eddington limit for a starburst.
  • We present new observational determinations of the evolution of the 2-10keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of AGN. We utilise data from a number of surveys including both the 2Ms Chandra Deep Fields and the AEGIS-X 200ks survey, enabling accurate measurements of the evolution of the faint end of the XLF. We combine direct, hard X-ray selection and spectroscopic follow-up or photometric redshift estimates at z<1.2 with a rest-frame UV colour pre-selection approach at higher redshifts to avoid biases associated with catastrophic failure of the photometric redshifts. Only robust optical counterparts to X-ray sources are considered using a likelihood ratio matching technique. A Bayesian methodology is developed that considers redshift probability distributions, incorporates selection functions for our high redshift samples, and allows robust comparison of different evolutionary models. We find that the XLF retains the same shape at all redshifts, but undergoes strong luminosity evolution out to z~1, and an overall negative density evolution with increasing redshift, which thus dominates the evolution at earlier times. We do not find evidence that a Luminosity-Dependent Density Evolution, and the associated flattening of the faint-end slope, is required to describe the evolution of the XLF. We find significantly higher space densities of low-luminosity, high-redshift AGN than in prior studies, and a smaller shift in the peak of the number density to lower redshifts with decreasing luminosity. The total luminosity density of AGN peaks at z=1.2+/-0.1, but there is a mild decline to higher redshifts. We find >50% of black hole growth takes place at z>1, with around half in Lx<10^44 erg/s AGN.
  • [abridged] We present constraints on the nature of the first galaxies selected at 350 microns. The sample includes galaxies discovered in the deepest blank-field survey at 350 microns (in the Bootes Deep Field) and also later serendipitous detections in the Lockman Hole. Spectral energy distribution templates are fit to identified counterparts, and the sample is found to comprise IR-luminous galaxies at 1<z<3 predominantly powered by star formation. The first spectrum of a 350-micron-selected galaxy provides an additional confirmation, showing prominent dust grain features typically associated with star-forming galaxies. Compared to submillimeter galaxies selected at 850 and 1100 microns, galaxies selected at 350 microns have a similar range of far-infrared color temperatures. However, no 350-micron-selected sources are reliably detected at 850 or 1100 microns. Galaxies in our sample with redshifts 1<z<2 show a tight correlation between the far- and mid-infrared flux densities, but galaxies at higher redshifts show a large dispersion in their mid- to far-infrared colors. The 350-micron flux densities (15<S(350)<40 mJy) place these objects near the Herschel/SPIRE 350-micron confusion threshold, with the lower limit on the star formation rate density suggesting the bulk of the 350-micron contribution will come from less luminous infrared sources and normal galaxies.
  • We present results from a continuing interferometric survey of high-redshift submillimeter galaxies with the Submillimeter Array, including high-resolution (beam size ~2 arcsec) imaging of eight additional AzTEC 1.1mm selected sources in the COSMOS Field, for which we obtain six reliable (peak S/N>5 or peak S/N>4 with multiwavelength counterparts within the beam) and two moderate significance (peak S/N>4) detections. When combined with previous detections, this yields an unbiased sample of millimeter-selected SMGs with complete interferometric followup. With this sample in hand, we (1) empirically confirm the radio-submillimeter association, (2) examine the submillimeter morphology - including the nature of submillimeter galaxies with multiple radio counterparts and constraints on the physical scale of the far infrared - of the sample, and (3) find additional evidence for a population of extremely luminous, radio-dim submillimeter galaxies that peaks at higher redshift than previous, radio-selected samples. In particular, the presence of such a population of high-redshift sources has important consequences for models of galaxy formation - which struggle to account for such objects even under liberal assumptions - and dust production models given the limited time since the Big Bang.
  • We present the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations for a sample of local elliptical galaxies to study later stages of AGN activities. A sample of 36 elliptical galaxies is selected from the Palomar spectroscopic survey. We detect nuclear non-stellar infrared emission in 9 of them. There is unambiguous evidence of circumnuclear dust in these 9 galaxies in their optical images. We also find a remarkable correlation between the infrared excess emission and the nuclear radio/X-ray emission, suggesting that infrared excess emission is tightly related with nuclear activity. Possible origin of infrared excess emission from hot dust heated by the central AGN is supported by spectral indices of IR excess emission.
  • We analyze a sample of galaxies chosen to have F24>0.5 mJy and satisfy a certain IRAC color criterion. IRS spectra yield redshifts, spectral types, and PAH luminosities, to which we add multi-wavelength broadband photometry. Stellar population modeling and IRS spectra together demonstrate that the double criteria used to select this sample have efficiently isolated massive star-forming galaxies at z~1.9. This is the first starburst-dominated ULIRG sample at high redshift with total infrared luminosity measured directly from FIR and millimeter photometry, and as such gives us the first accurate view of broadband SEDs for starburst galaxies at extremely high luminosity and at all wavelengths. Similar broadband data are assembled for three other galaxy samples -- local starburst galaxies, local AGN/ULIRGS, and a second 24mu-luminous z~1.9 sample dominated by AGN. L(PAH)/L(IR) for the new z~1.9 starburst sample is the highest ever seen, some three times higher than in local starbursts, whereas in AGNs this ratio is depressed below the starburst trend, often severely. Several pieces of evidence imply that AGNs exist in this starburst dominated sample, except two of which even host very strong AGN, while they still have very strong PAH emission. The ACS images show most objects have very extended morphologies in the rest-frame UV band, thus extended distribution of PAH molecules. Such an extended distribution prevents further destruction PAH molecules by central AGNs. We conclude that objects in this sample are ULIRGs powered mainly by starburst; and the total infrared luminosity density contributed by this type of objects is 0.9-2.6x 10^7 Lsol/Mpc^3.
  • We present millimetre observations of a sample of 12 high redshift ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) in the Extended Growth Strip (EGS). These objects were initially selected on the basis of their observed mid--IR colours (0.0 < [3.6]-[4.5] < 0.4 and -0.7 < [3.6]-[8.0] < 0.5) to lie at high redshift 1.5 < z < 3, and subsequent 20-38 micron mid-IR spectroscopy confirms that they lie in a narrow redshift window centered on z=2. We detect 9/12 of the objects in our sample at high significance (>3 sigma) with a mean 1200\micron flux of <F_1200> = 1.6+/-0.1 mJy. Our millimetre photometry, combined with existing far-IR photometry from the Far-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy (FIDEL) Survey and accurate spectroscopic redshifts, places constraints both sides of the thermal dust peak. This allows us to estimate the dust properties, including the far--IR luminosity, dust temperature, and dust mass. We find that our sample is similar to other high-z and intermediate-z ULIRGs, and local systems, but has a different dust selection function than submillimeter-selected galaxies. Finally, we use existing 20cm radio continuum imaging to test the far-IR/radio correlation at high redshift. We find that our sample is consistent with the local relation, implying little evolution. Furthermore, this suggests that our sample selection method is efficient at identifying ultraluminous, starburst--dominated systems within a very narrow redshift range centered at z~2.
  • We present the results of a Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 micron study of extended Lyman-alpha clouds (or Lyman-alpha Blobs, LABs) within the SSA22 filamentary structure at z = 3.09. We detect 6/26 LABs in all IRAC filters, four of which are also detected at 24 micron, and find good correspondence with the 850 micron measurements of Geach et al. 2005. An analysis of the rest-frame ultraviolet, optical, near- and mid-infrared colors reveals that these six systems exhibit signs of nuclear activity (AGN)and/or extreme star formation. Notably, they have properties that bridge galaxies dominated by star formation (Lyman-break galaxies; LBGs) and those with AGNs (LBGs classified as QSOs). The LAB systems not detected in all four IRAC bands, on the other hand, are, as a group, consistent with pure star forming systems, similar to the majority of the LBGs within the filament. These results indicate that the galaxies within LABs do not comprise a homogeneous population, though they are also consistent with scenarios in which the gas halos are ionized through a common mechanism such as galaxy-scale winds driven by the galaxies within them, or gravitational heating of the collapsing cloud itself.