• In a previous work, we reported on the discovery of supersonic magnetic upflows on granular cells in data from the {\sc Sunrise}/IMaX instrument. In the present work we investigate the physical origin of these events employing data of the same instrument but with higher spectral sampling. By means of the inversion of Stokes profiles we are able to recover the physical parameters (temperature, magnetic field, line-of-sight velocity, etc) present in the solar photosphere at the time of these events. The inversion is performed in a Monte-Carlo-like fashion, that is, repeating it many times with different initializations and retaining only the best result. We find that many of the events are characterized by a reversal in the polarity of the magnetic field along the vertical direction in the photosphere, accompanied by an enhancement in the temperature and by supersonic line-of-sight velocities. In about half of the studied events, large blue-shifted and red-shifted line-of-sight velocities coexist above/below each other. These features can be explained in terms of magnetic reconnection, where the energy stored in the magnetic field is released in the form of kinetic and thermal energy when magnetic field lines of opposite polarities coalesce. However, the agreement with magnetic reconnection is not perfect and therefore, other possible physical mechanisms might also play a role.
  • A 50 min time series of one-dimensional slit-spectrograms, taken in quiet sun at disk center, observed at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide), was used to study the global and spatial variations of different line parameters. In order to determine the vertical structure of the photosphere two lines with well separated formation heights have been considered. The data have been filtered of p-modes to isolate the pure convective phenomenon. From our studies of global correlation coefficients and coherence and phase shift analyzes between the several line parameters, the following results can be reported. The convective velocity pattern preserves structures larger than 1.0" up to the highest layers of the photosphere (~ 435 km). However, at these layers, in the intensity pattern only structures larger than 2.0" are still connected with those at the continuum level although showing inverted brightness contrast. This confirms an inversion of temperature that we have found at a height of ~140 km. A possible evidence of gravity waves superimposed to the convective motions is derived from the phase shift analysis. We interpret the behavior of the full width at half maximum and the equivalent width as a function of the distance to the granular borders, as a consequence of enhanced turbulence and/or strong velocity gradients in the intergranular lanes.
  • We study the energy flux carried by acoustic waves excited by convective motions at sub-photospheric levels. The analysis of high-resolution spectropolarimetric data taken with IMaX/Sunrise provides a total energy flux of ~ 6400--7700 Wm$^{-2}$ at a height of ~ 250 km in the 5.2-10 mHz range, i.e. at least twice the largest energy flux found in previous works. Our estimate lies within a factor of 2 of the energy flux needed to balance radiative losses from the chromosphere according to Anderson & Athay (1989) and revives interest in acoustic waves for transporting energy to the chromosphere. The acoustic flux is mainly found in the intergranular lanes but also in small rapidly-evolving granules and at the bright borders, forming dark dots and lanes of splitting granules.
  • Using the IMaX instrument on-board the Sunrise stratospheric balloon-telescope we have detected extremely shifted polarization signals around the Fe I 5250.217 {\AA} spectral line within granules in the solar photosphere. We interpret the velocities associated with these events as corresponding to supersonic and magnetic upflows. In addition, they are also related to the appearance of opposite polarities and highly inclined magnetic fields. This suggests that they are produced by the reconnection of emerging magnetic loops through granular upflows. The events occupy an average area of 0.046 arcsec$^2$ and last for about 80 seconds, with larger events having longer lifetimes. These supersonic events occur at a rate of $1.3\times10^{-5}$ occurrences per second per arcsec$^{2}$.
  • We describe the design of the Sunrise Filter Imager (SuFI) and the Image Stabilization and Light Distribution (ISLiD) unit onboard the Sunrise balloon borne solar observatory. This contribution provides the necessary information which is relevant to understand the instruments working principles, the relevant technical data, and the necessary information about calibration issues directly related to the science data.
  • Based on IMaX/Sunrise data, we report on a previously undetected phenomenon in solar granulation. We show that in a very narrow region separating granules and intergranular lanes the spectral line width of the Fe I 5250.2 A line becomes extremely small. We offer an explanation of this observation with the help of magneto-convection simulations. These regions with extremely small line widths correspond to the places where the granular flows bend from mainly upflow in granules to downflow in intergranular lanes. We show that the resolution and image stability achieved by IMaX/Sunrise are important requisites to detect this interesting phenomenon.
  • The design of modern instruments does not only imply thorough studies of instrumental effects but also a good understanding of the scientific analysis planned for the data. We investigate the reliability of Milne-Eddington (ME) inversions of high-resolution magnetograph measurements such as those to be obtained with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) aboard the Sunrise balloon. We also provide arguments to choose either Fe I 525.02 or 525.06 nm as the most suitable line for IMaX. We reproduce an IMaX observation using magnetoconvection simulations of the quiet Sun and synthesizing the four Stokes profiles emerging from them. The profiles are degraded by spatial and spectral resolution, noise, and limited wavelength sampling, just as real IMaX measurements. We invert these data and estimate the uncertainties in the retrieved physical parameters caused by the ME approximation and the spectral sampling.It is possible to infer the magnetic field strength, inclination, azimuth, and line-of-sight velocity from standard IMaX measurements (4 Stokes parameters, 5 wavelength points, and a signal-to-noise ratio of 1000) applying ME inversions to any of the Fe I lines at 525 nm. We also find that telescope diffraction has important effects on the spectra coming from very high resolution observations of inhomogeneous atmospheres. Diffration reduces the amplitude of the polarization signals and changes the asymmetry of the Stokes profiles. The two Fe I lines at 525 nm meet the scientific requirements of IMaX, but Fe I 525.02 nm is to be preferred because it leads to smaller uncertainties in the retrieved parameters and offers a better detectability of the weakest (linear) polarization signals prevailing in the quiet Sun.
  • High-resolution time series of sunspots have been obtained with the Swedish 1m Solar Telescope between 2003 and 2006 at different locations on the solar disc. Proper motions in seven different active regions have been studied. The analysis has been done by applying local correlation tracking to every series of sunspots, each of them more than 40 minutes long. The sunspots' shapes include a different variety of penumbral configurations. We report on a systematic behaviour of the large-scale outflows surrounding the sunspots, commonly known as moat flows, that are essentially present only when preceded by a penumbra not tangential but perpendicular to the sunspot border. We present one case for which this rule appears not to be confirmed. We speculate that the magnetic neutral line, which is located in the vicinity of the anomalous region, might be responsible for blocking the outflow. These new results confirm the systematic and strong relation between the moat flows and the existence of penumbrae. A comparative statistical study between moats and standard granulation is also performed.
  • Proper motions in a sunspot group with a delta-configuration and close to the solar disc center have been studied by employing local correlation tracking techniques. The analysis is based on more than one hour time series of G-band images. Radial outflows with a mean speed of 0.67 km s^{-1} have been detected around the spots, the well-known sunspots moats. However, these outflows are not found in those umbral core sides without penumbra. Moreover, moat flows are only found in those sides of penumbrae located in the direction marked by the penumbral filaments. Penumbral sides perpendicular to them show no moat flow. These results strongly suggest a relation between the moat flow and the well-known, filament aligned, Evershed flow. The standard picture of a moat flow originated from a blocking of the upward propagation of heat is commented in some detail.
  • Time series of high-resolution images of the complex active region NOAA 10786 are studied. The observations were performed in G-band (430.5 nm) and in the nearby continuum (463.3 nm), on July 9, 2005 at the Swedish 1-meter Solar Telecope (SST) in La Palma. Granular proper motions in the surroundings of the sunspots have been quantified. A large-scale radial outflow in the velocity range 0.3 - 1 km s^[-1] has been measured around the sunspots by using local correlation tracking techniques. However, this outflow is not found in those regions around the sunspots with no penumbral structure. This result evidences an association between penumbrae and the existence of strong horizontal outflows (the moat) in sunspots.
  • The Visible-light Imager and Magnetograph (VIM) proposed for the ESA Solar Orbiter mission will observe a photospheric spectral line at high spatial resolution. Here we simulate and interpret VIM measurements. Realistic MHD models are used to synthesize "observed" Stokes profiles of the photospheric Fe I 617.3 nm line. The profiles are degraded by telescope diffraction and detector pixel size to a spatial resolution of 162 km on the solar surface. We study the influence of spectral resolving power, noise, and limited wavelength sampling on the vector magnetic fields and line-of-sight velocities derived from Milne-Eddington inversions of the simulated measurements. VIM will provide reasonably accurate values of the atmospheric parameters even with filter widths of 120 mA and 3 wavelength positions plus continuum, as long as the noise level is kept below 10^-3 I_c.