• Nuclear stellar cusps are defined as central excess light component in the stellar light profiles of galaxies and are suggested to be stellar relics of intense compact starbursts in the central ~100-500 pc region of gas-rich major mergers. Here we probe the build-up of nuclear cusps during the actual starburst phase for a complete sample of Luminous Infrared Galaxy systems (85 LIRGs, with 11.4<log[LIR/L_sun]<12.5) in the GOALS sample. Cusp properties are derived via 2-dimensional fitting of the nuclear stellar light imaged in the near-infrared by the Hubble Space Telescope and have been combined with mid-IR diagnostics for AGN/starburst characterization. We find that nuclear stellar cusps are resolved in 76% of LIRGs (merger and non-interacting galaxies). The cusp strength and luminosity increases with far-IR luminosity (excluding AGN) and merger stage, confirming theoretical models that starburst activity is associated with the build-up of nuclear stellar cusps. Evidence for ultra compact nuclear starbursts is found in ~13% of LIRGs, which have a strong unresolved central NIR light component but no significant contribution of an AGN. The nuclear near-IR surface density (measured within 1 kpc radius) increases by a factor of ~5 towards late merger stages. A careful comparison to local early-type galaxies with comparable masses reveals (a) that local (U)LIRGs have a significantly larger cusp fraction and (b) that the majority of the cusp LIRGs have host galaxy luminosities (H-band) similar to core ellipticals which is roughly one order in magnitude larger than for cusp ellipticals.
  • The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is a multiwavelength study of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the local universe. Here we present low resolution Spitzer spectra covering 5-38um and provide a basic analysis of the mid-IR spectral properties for nearby LIRGs. In a companion paper, we discuss detailed fits to the spectra. The GOALS sample of 244 nuclei in 180 luminous and 22 ultraluminous IR galaxies represents a complete subset of the IRAS RBGS and covers a range of merger stages, morphologies and spectral types. The majority (>60%) of GOALS LIRGs have high 6.2um PAH equivalent widths (EQW > 0.4um) and low levels of silicate absorption (s_9.7um >-1.0). There is a general trend among the U/LIRGs for silicate depth and MIR slope to increase with LIR. U/LIRGs in the late stages of a merger also have on average steeper MIR slopes and higher levels of dust obscuration. Together these trends suggest that as gas & dust is funneled towards the center of a coalescing merger, the nuclei become more compact and obscured. The sources that depart from these correlations have very low PAH EQW (EQW < 0.1um) consistent with their MIR emission being dominated by an AGN. The most heavily dust obscured sources are the most compact in their MIR emission, suggesting that the obscuring (cool) dust is associated with the outer regions of the starburst. As the merger progresses a marked decline is seen for the fraction of high EQW (star formation dominated) sources while the fraction of composite sources increases but the fraction of AGN-dominated sources remains low. When compared to the MIR spectra of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at z~2, the average GOALS LIRG is more absorbed at 9.7um and has more PAH emission. However, when the AGN contributions to both the local LIRGs and the high-z SMGs are removed, the average local starbursting LIRG closely resembles the starbursting SMGs.
  • We have mapped the key mid-IR diagnostics in eight major merger systems of the Toomre Sequence (NGC4676, NGC7592, NGC6621, NGC2623, NGC6240, NGC520, NGC3921, and NGC7252) using the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). With these maps, we explore the variation of the ionized-gas, PAH, and warm-gas (H_2) properties across the sequence and within the galaxies. While the global PAH interband strength and ionized gas flux ratios ([Ne III]/[Ne II]) are similar to those of normal star forming galaxies, the distribution of the spatially resolved PAH and fine structure line flux ratios is significant different from one system to the other. Rather than a constant H_2/PAH flux ratio, we find that the relation between the H_2 and PAH fluxes is characterized by a power law with a roughly constant exponent (0.61+/-0.05) over all merger components and spatial scales. While following the same power law on local scales, three galaxies have a factor of ten larger integrated (i.e. global) H_2/PAH flux ratio than the rest of the sample, even larger than what it is in most nearby AGNs. These findings suggest a common dominant excitation mechanism for H_2 emission over a large range of global H_2/PAH flux ratios in major mergers. Early merger systems show a different distribution between the cold (CO J=1-0) and warm (H_2) molecular gas component, which is likely due to the merger interaction. Strong evidence for buried star formation in the overlap region of the merging galaxies is found in two merger systems (NGC6621 and NGC7592) as seen in the PAH, [Ne II], [Ne III], and warm gas line emission, but with no apparent corresponding CO (J=1-0) emission. Our findings also demonstrate that the variations of the physical conditions within a merger are much larger than any systematic trends along the Toomre Sequence.
  • We present X-ray data for a complete sample of 44 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. These are the X-ray observations of the high luminosity portion of the Great Observatory All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), which includes the most luminous infrared selected galaxies, log (Lir/Lsun) > 11.73, in the local universe, z < 0.088. X-rays were detected from 43 out of 44 objects, and their arcsec-resolution images, spectra, and radial brightness distributions are presented. With a selection by hard X-ray colour and the 6.4 keV iron line, AGN are found in 37% of the objects, with higher luminosity sources more likely to contain an AGN. These AGN also tend to be found in late-stage mergers. The AGN fraction would increase to 48% if objects with mid-IR [Ne V] detection are included. Double AGN are clearly detected only in NGC 6240 among 24 double/triple systems. Other AGN are found either in single nucleus objects or in one of the double nuclei at similar rates. Objects without conventional X-ray signatures of AGN appear to be hard X-ray quiet, relative to the X-ray to far-IR correlation for starburst galaxies, as discussed elsewhere. Most objects also show extended soft X-ray emission, which is likely related to an outflow from the nuclear region, with a metal abundance pattern suggesting enrichment by core collapse supernovae, as expected for a starburst.
  • Analysis of data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the double nucleus ULIRG Mrk 273 reveals an absorbed hard X-ray source coincident with the southwest nucleus, implying that this unresolved near infrared source is where an active nucleus resides while the northern nuclear region contains a powerful starburst which dominates the far infrared luminosity. There is evidence of a slight image extension in the 6-7 keV band, where a Fe K line is present, towards the northern nucleus. A large-scale, diffuse emission nebula detected in soft X-rays contains a dark lane that spatially coincides with a high surface-brightness tidal tail extending ~50 arcsec (40 kpc) to the south. The soft X-ray source is likely located behind the tidal tail which absorbs X-ray photons along the line of sight. The estimated column density of cold gas in the tidal tail responsible for shadowing the soft X-rays is nH >= 6e+21 cm-2, consistent with the tidal tail having an edge-on orientation.
  • We present results of Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS H-band imaging of 73 of most luminous (i.e., log[L_IR/L_0]>11.4) Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). This dataset combines multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopic data from space (Spitzer, HST, GALEX, and Chandra) and ground-based telescopes. In this paper we use the high-resolution near-infrared data to recover nuclear structure that is obscured by dust at optical wavelengths and measure the evolution in this structure along the merger sequence. A large fraction of all galaxies in our sample possess double nuclei (~63%) or show evidence for triple nuclei (~6%). Half of these double nuclei are not visible in the HST B-band images due to dust obscuration. The majority of interacting LIRGs have remaining merger timescales of 0.3 to 1.3 Gyrs, based on the projected nuclear separations and the mass ratio of nuclei. We find that the bulge luminosity surface density increases significantly along the merger sequence (primarily due to a decrease of the bulge radius), while the bulge luminosity shows a small increase towards late merger stages. No significant increase of the bulge Sersic index is found. LIRGs that show no interaction features have on average a significantly larger bulge luminosity, suggesting that non merging LIRGs have larger bulge masses than merging LIRGs. This may be related to the flux limited nature of the sample and the fact that mergers can significantly boost the IR luminosity of otherwise low luminosity galaxies. We find that the projected nuclear separation is significantly smaller for ULIRGs (median value of 1.2 kpc) than for LIRGs (mean value of 6.7 kpc), suggesting that the LIRG phase appears earlier in mergers than the ULIRG phase.
  • An analysis of data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite is presented for the z=0.036 merging galaxy system II Zw 096 (CGCG 448-020). Because II Zw 096 has an infrared luminosity of log(L_IR/L_sun) = 11.94, it is classified as a Luminous Infrared Galaxy (LIRG), and was observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The Spitzer data suggest that 80% of the total infrared luminosity comes from an extremely compact, red source not associated with the nuclei of the merging galaxies. The Spitzer mid-infrared spectra indicate no high-ionization lines from a buried active galactic nucleus in this source. The strong detection of the 3.3 micron and 6.2 micron PAH emission features in the AKARI and Spitzer spectra also implies that the energy source of II Zw 096 is a starburst. Based on Spitzer infrared imaging and AKARI near-infrared spectroscopy, the star formation rate is estimated to be 120 M_sun/yr and > 45 M_sun/yr, respectively. Finally, the high-resolution B, I, and H-band images show many star clusters in the interacting system. The colors of these clusters suggest at least two populations - one with an age of 1-5 Myr and one with an age of 20-500 Myr, reddened by 0-2 magnitudes of visual extinction. The masses of these clusters span a range between 10^6-10^8 M_sun. This starburst source is reminiscent of the extra-nuclear starburst seen in NGC 4038/9 (the Antennae Galaxies) and Arp 299 but approximately an order of magnitude more luminous than the Antennae. The source is remarkable in that the off-nuclear infrared luminosity dominates the enitre system.
  • We present 20 band photometry from the far-IR to X-ray in the Spitzer IRAC dark field. The bias for the near-IR camera on Spitzer is calibrated by observing a ~20 arcminute diameter "dark" field near the north ecliptic pole roughly every two-to-three weeks throughout the mission duration of Spitzer. The field is unique for its extreme depth, low background, high quality imaging, time-series information, and accompanying photometry including data taken with Akari, Palomar, MMT, KPNO, Hubble, and Chandra. This serendipitous survey contains the deepest mid-IR data taken to date. This dataset is well suited for studies of intermediate redshift galaxy clusters, high redshift galaxies, the first generation of stars, and the lowest mass brown dwarfs, among others. This paper provides a summary of the data characteristics and catalog generation from all bands collected to date as well as a discussion of photometric redshifts and initial and expected science results and goals. To illustrate the scientific potential of this unique dataset, we also present here IRAC color color diagrams.
  • The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) combines data from NASA's Spitzer, Chandra, Hubble and GALEX observatories, together with ground-based data into a comprehensive imaging and spectroscopic survey of over 200 low redshift Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs). The LIRGs are a complete subset of the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). The LIRGs targeted in GOALS span the full range of nuclear spectral types defined via traditional optical line-ratio diagrams as well as interaction stages. They provide an unbiased picture of the processes responsible for enhanced infrared emission in galaxies in the local Universe. As an example of the analytic power of the multi-wavelength GOALS dataset, we present data for the interacting system VV 340 (IRAS F14547+2449). Between 80-95% of the total far-infrared emission (or about 5E11 solar luminosities) originates in VV 340 North. While the IRAC colors of VV 340 North and South are consistent with star-forming galaxies, both the Spitzer IRS and Chandra ACIS data indicate the presence of a buried AGN in VV 340 North. The GALEX far and near-UV fluxes imply a extremely large infrared "excess" (IRX) for the system (IR/FUV = 81) which is well above the correlation seen in starburst galaxies. Most of this excess is driven by VV 340 N, which alone has an IR excess of nearly 400. The VV 340 system seems to be comprised of two very different galaxies - an infrared luminous edge-on galaxy (VV 340 North) that dominates the long-wavelength emission from the system and which hosts a buried AGN, and a face-on starburst (VV 340 South) that dominates the short-wavelength emission.
  • Using three newly identified galaxy clusters at z~1 (photometric redshift) we measure the evolution of the galaxies within clusters from high redshift to the present day by studying the growth of the red cluster sequence. The clusters are located in the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Dark Field, an extremely deep mid-infrared survey near the north ecliptic pole with photometry in 18 total bands from X-ray through far-IR. Two of the candidate clusters are additionally detected as extended emission in matching Chandra data in the survey area allowing us to measure their masses to be M_{500}= 6.2 \pm 1.0 \times 10^{13} and 3.6 \pm 1.1 \times 10^{13} solar masses. For all three clusters we create a composite color magnitude diagram in rest-frame B-K using our deep HST and Spitzer imaging. By comparing the fraction of low luminosity member galaxies on the composite red sequence with the corresponding population in local clusters at z=0.1 taken from the COSMOS survey, we examine the effect of a galaxy's mass on its evolution. We find a deficit of faint galaxies on the red sequence in our z~1 clusters which implies that more massive galaxies have evolved in clusters faster than less massive galaxies, and that the less massive galaxies are still forming stars in clusters such that they have not yet settled onto the red sequence.
  • We present the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of a hard X-ray selected sample. The sample contains 136 sources with F(2-10 keV)>10^-14 erg/cm^2/s and 132 are AGNs. The sources are detected in a 1 square degree area of the XMM-Newton-Medium Deep Survey where optical data from the VVDS, CFHTLS surveys, and infrared data from the SWIRE survey are available. Based on a SED fitting technique we derive photometric redshifts with sigma(1+z)=0.11 and 6% of outliers and identify AGN signatures in 83% of the objects. This fraction is higher than derived when a spectroscopic classification is available. The remaining 17+9-6% of AGNs shows star-forming galaxy SEDs (SF class). The sources with AGN signatures are divided in two classes, AGN1 (33+6-1%) and AGN2 (50+6-11). The AGN1 and AGN2 classes include sources whose SEDs are fitted by type 1 and type 2 AGN templates, respectively. On average, AGN1s show soft X-ray spectra, consistent with being unabsorbed, while AGN2s and SFs show hard X-ray spectra, consistent with being absorbed. The analysis of the average SEDs as a function of X-ray luminosity shows a reddening of the IR SEDs, consistent with a decreasing contribution from the host galaxy at higher luminosities. The AGNs in the SF classes are likely obscured in the mid-infrared, as suggested by their low L(3-20micron)/Lcorr(0.5-10 keV) ratios. We confirm the previously found correlation for AGNs between the radio luminosity and the X-ray and the mid-infrared luminosities. The X-ray-radio correlation can be used to identify heavily absorbed AGNs. However, the estimated radio fluxes for the missing AGN population responsible for the bulk of the background at E>10 keV are too faint to be detected even in the deepest current radio surveys.
  • We present details of the discovery of XLSSJ022303.0-043622, a z=1.2 cluster of galaxies. This cluster was identified from its X-ray properties and selected as a z>1 candidate from its optical/near-IR characteristics in the XMM Large-Scale Structure Survey (XMM-LSS). It is the most distant system discovered in the survey to date. We present ground-based optical and near IR observations of the system carried out as part of the XMM-LSS survey. The cluster has a bolometric X-ray luminosity of 1.1 +/- 0.7 x 10^44 erg/s, fainter than most other known z>1 X-ray selected clusters. In the optical it has a remarkably compact core, with at least a dozen galaxies inside a 125 kpc radius circle centred on the X-ray position. Most of the galaxies within the core, and those spectroscopically confirmed to be cluster members, have stellar masses similar to those of massive cluster galaxies at low redshift. They have colours comparable to those of galaxies in other z>1 clusters, consistent with showing little sign of strong ongoing star formation. The bulk of the star formation within the galaxies appears to have ceased at least 1.5 Gyr before the observed epoch. Our results are consistent with massive cluster galaxies forming at z>1 and passively evolving thereafter. We also show that the system is straightforwardly identified in Spitzer/IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron data obtained by the SWIRE survey emphasising the power and utility of joint XMM and Spitzer searches for the most distant clusters.
  • Using the large multi-wavelength data set in the chandra/SWIRE Survey (0.6 square degrees in the Lockman Hole), we show evidence for the existence of highly obscured (Compton-thick) AGN, estimate a lower limit to their surface density and characterize their multi-wavelength properties. Two independent selection methods based on the X-ray and infrared spectral properties are presented. The two selected samples contain 1) 5 X-ray sources with hard X-ray spectra and column densities > 10^24 cm-2, and 2) 120 infrared sources with red and AGN-dominated infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We estimate a surface density of at least 25 Compton-thick AGN per square degree detected in the infrared in the chandra/SWIRE field of which ~40% show distinct AGN signatures in their optical/near-infrared SEDs, the remainings being dominated by the host-galaxy emission. Only ~33% of all Compton-thick AGN are detected in the X-rays at our depth (F(0.3-8 keV)>10^-15 erg/cm2/s. We report the discovery of two sources in our sample of Compton-thick AGN, SWIRE_J104409.95+585224.8 (z=2.54) and SWIRE_J104406.30+583954.1 (z=2.43), which are the most luminous Compton-thick AGN at high-z currently known. The properties of these two sources are discussed in detail with an analysis of their spectra, SEDs, luminosities and black-hole masses.
  • We present results from two mid-infrared imaging programs of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and fine-structure elliptical galaxies. The former are known to nearly all be recent mergers between two gas-rich spiral galaxies, while the latter are also believed to be even more aged merger remnants. An examination of these two classes of objects, which may represent different stages of the same putative merger sequence, should reveal similarities in the distribution of their stellar populations and dust content consistent with that expected for time-evolution of the merger. The data reveal for the first time extended dust emission in the ULIRG galaxy bodies and along their tidal features. However, contrary to expectation, we find that the vast majority of the fine-structure elliptical galaxies lack such structured emission. This likely results from the optical selection of the elliptical sample, resulting in a population that reflects the IR-activity (or lack thereof) of optically selected interacting galaxies. Alternately, this may reflect an evolutionary process in the distribution of the dust content of the galaxy bodies.
  • We have observed 14 nearby (z<0.16) Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) with Spitzer at 3.6-24 microns. The underlying host galaxies are well-detected, in addition to the luminous nuclear cores. While the spatial resolution of Spitzer is poor, the great sensitivity of the data reveals the underlying galaxy merger remnant, and provides the first look at off-nuclear mid-infrared activity.
  • As part of the In-Orbit Checkout activities for the Spitzer Space Telescope, the IRAC team carried out a deep observation (average integration time ~8 hours) of a field surrounding the bright QSO HS 1700+6416. This field contains several hundred z~3 Lyman-break galaxy candidates, and we report here on their mid-infrared properties, including the IRAC detection rate, flux densities and colors, and the results of fitting population synthesis models to the optical, near-infrared, and IRAC magnitudes. The results of the model-fitting show that previous optical/near-infrared studies of LBGs were not missing large, hidden old stellar populations. The LBG candidates' properties are consistent with those of massive, star-forming galaxies at z~3. Other IRAC sources in the same field have similar properties, so IRAC selection may prove a promising method of finding additional high-redshift galaxies.
  • We present high-resolution (30"-1') 12, 25, 60, and 100 micron images of 106 interacting galaxy systems contained in the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS, Sanders et al. 2003), a complete sample of all galaxies having a 60 micron flux density greater than 5.24 Jy. These systems were selected to have at least two distinguishable galaxies separated by less than three average galactic diameters, and thus we have excluded very widely separated systems and very advanced mergers. The new complete survey has the same properties as the prototype survey of Surace et al. 1993. We find no increased tendency for infrared-bright galaxies to be associated with other infrared bright galaxies among the widely separated pairs studied here. We find small enhancements in far-infrared activity in multiple galaxy systems relative to RBGS non-interacting galaxies with the same blue luminosity distribution. We also find no differences in infrared activity (as measured by infrared color and luminosity) between late and early-type spiral galaxies.
  • High-resolution CO(1-0) observations of five ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIGs: L_IR [8-1000um] >~ 10^12 L_sun) with double nuclei are analyzed. These sources constitute a complete subset of local ULIGs expected to be in an intermediate stage of merging and selected with projected nuclear separations of 2.0-5.4 (3-5 kpc) so they could be resolved with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory Millimeter Array. The observed pairs include two mergers with cool far-infrared colors (25um to 60um flux density ratio f_25um/f_60um < 0.2) from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Bright Galaxy Sample (IRAS 12112+0305 and IRAS 14348-1447) and three mergers with warm infrared dust temperatures f_25um/f_60um >~ 0.2) selected from the IRAS Warm Galaxy Sample (IRAS 08572+3915, IRAS 13451+1232 = PKS 1345+12, and IRAS 13536+1836 = Mrk 463). These ULIGs are further distinguished by the presence of pairs of active nuclei; among the ten nuclei, nine have Seyfert or LINER classifications and one is unclassified. Molecular gas is detected only on the redder, more radio-luminous nucleus of the warm objects, whereas both nuclei of the cool ULIGs are detected in CO. The inferred molecular gas masses for the detected nuclei are 0.1-1.2x10^10 M_sun, and the undetected nuclei have molecular gas masses at least 1.2--2.8 times less than that of their CO-luminous companions. Upper limits on the extent of the CO emitting regions of each detected nucleus range from 2--4 kpc, which is about 3-6 times smaller than the average effective CO diameter of nearby spiral galaxies...
  • Millimeter-wave (CO) observations of optically-selected QSOs are potentially a powerful tool for studying the properties of both the QSOs and their host galaxies. We summarize here a recent molecular gas survey of z<0.17 optical QSOs with infrared (IR) excess, L_IR (8-1000 um) / L_bbb (0.1-1.0 um) > 0.36. Eight of these QSOs have been detected to date in CO(1-0), and the derived molecular gas masses are in the range 1.7-35x10^9 M_sun. The high L_IR / L'_CO of QSOs relative to the bulk of the local (z<0.2) IR luminous galaxy merger population is indicative of significant heating of dust (L_IR) by the QSO nucleus and/or by massive stars created in the host galaxy with high efficiency (i.e., per unit molecular gas, L'_CO).
  • The initial results of a millimeter (CO) survey of infrared-excess, optically-selected quasars from the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) with redshifts in the range 0.04 < z < 0.17 are presented. These observations represent the first step towards establishing with a complete sample whether or not quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) reside in molecular gas-rich galaxies, as well as towards determining how the infrared and molecular gas properties of QSOs compare with those of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIGs), which are a possible evolutionary precursor of QSOs. The sample consists of QSOs having absolute blue magnitudes, M_B <~ -22.0, and infrared excesses, L_IR (8-1000 um) /L_bbb (0.1-1.0 um) >0.36, where the contribution to the bolometric luminosity of infrared thermal dust emission for all PG QSOs is typically 20--40%. Six out of 10 of the QSOs observed are detected in the CO(1-0) emission line; two detections confirm previous, less sensitive detections of CO(1-0) in PG 1613+658 and PG 0838+770, and four additional QSOs are detected for the first time (PG 1119+120, PG 1351+640, PG 1415+451, and PG 1440+356). These six detections, plus two previous detections of CO in IZw1 and Mrk 1014, bring the total number of 0.04 < z < 0.17 infrared-excess PG QSOs detected in CO to date to eight, and provide possible evidence that, in addition to fueling star formation, molecular gas may also serve as a primary source of fuel for QSO activity...
  • Millimeter (CO) observations of 5 double-nucleus ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIG) mergers are presented. With nuclear separations of 3-5 kpc, these galaxies are in the ``intermediate'' stages of the merger process. A preliminary comparison of the distribution of molecular gas (the likely fuel source for both starbursts and active galactic nuclei: AGN) shows a tendency for molecular gas to be associated with the AGN nucleus of ULIGs with ``warm'', Seyfert-like infrared colors ($f_{25 microns}/f_{60 microns} >~ 0.20) and associated with both stellar nuclei of ULIGs with ``cool'' infrared colors (f_{25 microns} /f_{60 microns} < 0.2). Studies of ULIGs with a wide range of nuclear separations using the high resolution and increased sensitivity of ALMA will provide a larger statistical sample with which the gas distribution, molecular gas masses, and densities can be determined as a function of the evolutionary stage, starburst and AGN activity, and lookback time.
  • We present near-infrared images obtained with the HST NICMOS camera for a sample of 9 luminous (LIGs: L_IR (8-1000 microns) >~ 10^11 L_sun) and 15 ultra-luminous (ULIGS: L_IR >~ 10^12 L_sun) infrared galaxies. The sample includes representative systems classified as warm (f_25/f_60 > 0.2) and cold (f_25/f_60 <~ 0.2) based on the mid-infrared colors and systems with nuclear emission lines classified as HII (i.e. starburst), QSO, Seyfert and LINER. The morphologies of the sample galaxies are diverse and provide further support for the idea that they are created by the collision or interactions of spiral galaxies. Although no new nuclei are seen in the NICMOS images, the NICMOS images do reveal new spiral structures, bridges, and circumnuclear star clusters...
  • Complete samples of ultraluminous infrared galaxies have been imaged at R-band and K-band from Mauna Kea. Here we present a preliminary analysis of the host galaxy magnitudes and the 1-D radial profiles for a subset of objects in the IRAS 1-Jy sample of ULIGs (z < 0.3), and compare these properties with recently published data for "low-z" QSOs. ULIGs in the 1-Jy sample reside in luminous hosts, with mean luminosities 2.7L* at K-band (range 0.7-11 L*) and 2.2L* at R-band (range 0.5-9 L*), values that are remarkably similar in the mean and range for the hosts of low-z QSOs. Approximately one-third of ULIGs have single nuclei and radial profiles that are closely approximated by a r{1/4}-law over the inner 2-10 kpc galactocentric radius. These "E-like" hosts have half-light radii, and surface brightness similar to QSO hosts at R-band, but systematically smaller half-light radii than QSOs at K-band.
  • High-resolution, CO(1-0) interferometry of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 14348-1447 is presented. The merger system has a molecular gas mass of \~3x10^10 solar masses and a projected nuclear separation of 4.8 kpc (3.5"), making it one of the most molecular gas-rich galaxies known and an ideal candidate for studying the intermediate stages of an ultraluminous merger event. The CO morphology shows two molecular gas components associated with the stellar nuclei of the progenitors, consistent with the idea that the molecular disks are gravitationally bound by the dense bulges of the progenitor galaxies as the interaction proceeds. In contrast, less luminous infrared galaxies observed to date with projected nuclear separations of ~<5 kpc show a dominant CO component between the stellar nuclei. This discrepancy may be an indication that the progenitors of mergers with lower infrared luminosity do not possess massive bulges, and that the gas is stripped during the initial encounter of their progenitors. A comparison of the CO and radio luminosities of the NE and SW component show them to have comparable radio and CO flux ratios of f(NE)/f(SW) ~0.6, possibly indicating that the amount of star-forming molecular gas in the progenitors is correlated with the supernovae rate. The estimate of molecular gas masses of the nuclei and the extent of the radio emission are used to infer that the nuclei of IR 14348-1447 have gas densities comparable to the cores of elliptical galaxies.
  • Observations of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) with an achieved resolution approaching the diffraction limit in the mid-infrared from 8 - 25 $\mu$m using the Keck Telescopes are reported. We find extremely compact structures, with spatial scales of $< 0.3''$ (diameter) in six of the seven ULIRGs observed. These compact sources emit between 30% and 100% of the mid-infrared energy from these galaxies. We have utilized the compact mid-infrared structures as a diagnostic of whether an AGN or a compact (100 -- 300 pc) starburst is the primary power source in these ULIRGs. In Markarian 231, the upper limit on the diameter of the 12.5 $\mu$m source, 0.13$''$, shows that the size of the infrared source must increase with increasing wavelength, consistent with AGN models. In IRAS 05189-2524 and IRAS 08572+3915 there is strong evidence that the source size increases with increasing wavelength. This suggests heating by a central source rather than an extended luminosity source, consistent with the optical classification as an AGN. The compact mid-infrared sources seen in the other galaxies cannot be used to distinguish the ultimate luminosity source. If these ULIRGs are powered by compact starbursts, the star formation rates seen in the central few hundred parsecs far exceed the global rates seen in nearby starburst galaxies, and approach the surface brightness of individual clusters in nearby starburst galaxies.