• The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) combines data from NASA's Spitzer, Chandra, Hubble and GALEX observatories, together with ground-based data into a comprehensive imaging and spectroscopic survey of over 200 low redshift Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs). The LIRGs are a complete subset of the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). The LIRGs targeted in GOALS span the full range of nuclear spectral types defined via traditional optical line-ratio diagrams as well as interaction stages. They provide an unbiased picture of the processes responsible for enhanced infrared emission in galaxies in the local Universe. As an example of the analytic power of the multi-wavelength GOALS dataset, we present data for the interacting system VV 340 (IRAS F14547+2449). Between 80-95% of the total far-infrared emission (or about 5E11 solar luminosities) originates in VV 340 North. While the IRAC colors of VV 340 North and South are consistent with star-forming galaxies, both the Spitzer IRS and Chandra ACIS data indicate the presence of a buried AGN in VV 340 North. The GALEX far and near-UV fluxes imply a extremely large infrared "excess" (IRX) for the system (IR/FUV = 81) which is well above the correlation seen in starburst galaxies. Most of this excess is driven by VV 340 N, which alone has an IR excess of nearly 400. The VV 340 system seems to be comprised of two very different galaxies - an infrared luminous edge-on galaxy (VV 340 North) that dominates the long-wavelength emission from the system and which hosts a buried AGN, and a face-on starburst (VV 340 South) that dominates the short-wavelength emission.
  • We demonstrate a new class of hollow-core Bragg fibers that are composed of concentric cylindrical silica rings separated by nanoscale support bridges. We theoretically predict and experimentally observe hollow-core confinement over an octave frequency range. The bandwidth of bandgap guiding in this new class of Bragg fibers exceeds that of other hollow-core fibers reported in the literature. With only three rings of silica cladding layers, these Bragg fibers achieve propagation loss of the order of 1 dB/m.
  • The 0.7 (2e^2/h) conductance anomaly is studied in strongly confined, etched GaAs/GaAlAs quantum point contacts, by measuring the differential conductance as a function of source-drain and gate bias as well as a function of temperature. We investigate in detail how, for a given gate voltage, the differential conductance depends on the finite bias voltage and find a so-called self-gating effect, which we correct for. The 0.7 anomaly at zero bias is found to evolve smoothly into a conductance plateau at 0.85 (2e^2/h) at finite bias. Varying the gate voltage the transition between the 1.0 and the 0.85 (2e^2/h) plateaus occurs for definite bias voltages, which defines a gate voltage dependent energy difference $\Delta$. This energy difference is compared with the activation temperature T_a extracted from the experimentally observed activated behavior of the 0.7 anomaly at low bias. We find \Delta = k_B T_a which lends support to the idea that the conductance anomaly is due to transmission through two conduction channels, of which the one with its subband edge \Delta below the chemical potential becomes thermally depopulated as the temperature is increased.
  • Complete samples of ultraluminous infrared galaxies have been imaged at R-band and K-band from Mauna Kea. Here we present a preliminary analysis of the host galaxy magnitudes and the 1-D radial profiles for a subset of objects in the IRAS 1-Jy sample of ULIGs (z < 0.3), and compare these properties with recently published data for "low-z" QSOs. ULIGs in the 1-Jy sample reside in luminous hosts, with mean luminosities 2.7L* at K-band (range 0.7-11 L*) and 2.2L* at R-band (range 0.5-9 L*), values that are remarkably similar in the mean and range for the hosts of low-z QSOs. Approximately one-third of ULIGs have single nuclei and radial profiles that are closely approximated by a r{1/4}-law over the inner 2-10 kpc galactocentric radius. These "E-like" hosts have half-light radii, and surface brightness similar to QSO hosts at R-band, but systematically smaller half-light radii than QSOs at K-band.
  • The 0.7 conductance anomaly in the quantized conductance of trench etched GaAs quantum point contacts is studied experimentally. The temperature dependence of the anomaly measured with vanishing source-drain bias reveals the same activated behavior as reported earlier for top-gated structures. Our main result is that the zero bias, high temperature 0.7 anomaly found in activation measurements and the finite bias, low temperature 0.9 anomaly found in transport spectroscopy have the same origin: a density dependent excitation gap.
  • We present new results of the ``0.7'' 2(e^2)/h structure or quasi plateau in some of the most strongly confined point contacts so far reported. This strong confinement is obtained by a combination of shallow etching and metal gate deposition on modulation doped GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures. The resulting subband separations are up to 20 meV, and as a consequence the quantized conductance can be followed at temperatures up to 30 K, an order of magnitude higher than in conventional split gate devices. We observe pronounced quasi plateaus at several of the lowest conductance steps all the way from their formation around 1 K to 30 K, where the entire conductance quantization is smeared out thermally. We study the deviation of the conductance from ideal integer quantization as a function of temperature, and we find an activated behavior, exp(-T_a/T), with a density dependent activation temperature T_a of the order of 2 K. We analyze our results in terms of a simple theoretical model involving scattering against plasmons in the constriction.