• The Large Early Galaxy Census (LEGA-C) is a Public Spectroscopic Survey of $\sim3200$ $K$-band selected galaxies at redshifts $z=0.6-1.0$ with stellar masses M_star > 1e10M_sun, conducted with VIMOS on ESO's Very Large Telescope. The survey is embedded in the COSMOS field ($R.A. = 10h00$; $Dec.=+2\deg$). The 20-hour long integrations produce high-$S/N$ continuum spectra that reveal ages, metallicities and velocity dispersions of the stellar populations. LEGA-C's unique combination of sample size and depth will enable us for the first time to map the stellar content at large look-back time, across galaxies of different types and star-formation activity. Observations started in December 2014 and are planned to be completed by mid 2018, with early data releases of the spectra and value-added products. In this paper we present the science case, the observing strategy, an overview of the data reduction process and data products, and a first look at the relationship between galaxy structure and spectral properties, as it existed 7 Gyr ago.
  • The Star Formation Rate (SFR) is one of the main parameters used to analyze the evolution of galaxies through time. The need for recovering the light reprocessed by dust commonly requires the use of low spatial resolution far-infrared data. Recombination-line luminosities provide an alternative, although uncertain dust-extinction corrections based on narrow-band imaging or long-slit spectroscopy have traditionally posed a limit to their applicability. Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) is clearly the way to overcome such limitation. We obtain integrated H{\alpha}, ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR)-based SFR measurements for 272 galaxies from the CALIFA survey at 0.005 < z < 0.03 using single-band and hybrid tracers. We provide updated calibrations, both global and split by properties (including stellar mass and morphological type), referred to H{\alpha}. The extinction-corrected H{\alpha} luminosity agrees with the updated hybrid SFR estimators based on either UV or H{\alpha} plus IR luminosity over the full range of SFRs (0.03-20 M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$). The coefficient that weights the amount of energy produced by newly-born stars that is reprocessed by dust on the hybrid tracers, a$_{IR}$, shows a large dispersion. However, it does not became increasingly small at high attenuations, as expected if significant highly-obscured H$\alpha$ emission would be missed. Lenticulars, early-type spirals and type-2 AGN host galaxies show smaller coefficients due to the contribution of optical photons and AGN to dust heating. In the Local Universe the H{\alpha} luminosity derived from IFS observations can be used to measure SFR, at least in statistically-significant, optically-selected galaxy samples. The analysis of the SFR calibrations by galaxies properties could be potentially used by other works to study the impact of different selection criteria in the SFR values derived.
  • Physical conditions of the interstellar medium in galaxies are closely linked to the ambient radiation field and the heating of dust grains. In order to characterize dust properties in galaxies over a wide range of physical conditions, we present here the radial surface brightness profiles of the entire sample of 61 galaxies from Key Insights into Nearby Galaxies: Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH). The main goal of our work is the characterization of the grain emissivities, dust temperatures, and interstellar radiation fields responsible for heating the dust. After fitting the dust and stellar radial profiles with exponential functions, we fit the far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) in each annular region with single-temperature modified black bodies using both variable (MBBV) and fixed (MBBF) emissivity indices beta, as well as with physically motivated dust models. Results show that while most SED parameters decrease with radius, the emissivity index beta also decreases with radius in some galaxies, but in others is increasing, or rising in the inner regions and falling in the outer ones. Despite the fixed grain emissivity (average beta~ 2.1) of the physically-motivated models, they are well able to accommodate flat spectral slopes with beta<= 1. We find that flatter slopes (beta<= 1.5) are associated with cooler temperatures, contrary to what would be expected from the usual Tdust-beta degeneracy. This trend is related to variations in Umin since beta and Umin are very closely linked over the entire range in Umin sampled by the KINGFISH galaxies: low Umin is associated with flat beta<=1. Both these results strongly suggest that the low apparent \beta values (flat slopes) in MBBV fits are caused by temperature mixing along the line-of-sight, rather than by intrinsic variations in grain properties. Abstract truncated for arXiv.
  • We review the main advances brought by the Spitzer Space Telescope in the field of nearby galaxies studies, concentrating on a few subject areas, including: (1) the physics of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons that generate the mid-infrared features between ~3.5 micron and ~20 micron; (2) the use of the mid- and far-infrared emission from galaxies as star formation rate indicators; and (3) the improvement of mid-infrared diagnostics to discriminate between thermal (star-formation) and non-thermal (AGN) emission in galaxies and galaxy centers.
  • We present specific Star Formation Rate (sSFR) radial profiles for a sample of 161 relatively face-on spiral galaxies from the GALEX Atlas of Nearby Galaxies. The sSFR profiles are derived from GALEX & 2MASS (FUV-K) color profiles after a proper SFR calibration of the UV luminosity and K-band mass-to-light ratio are adopted. The (FUV-K) profiles were first corrected for foreground Galactic extinction and later for internal extinction using the ratio of the total-infrared (TIR) to FUV emission. For those objects where TIR-to-FUV-ratio radial profiles were not available, the (FUV-NUV) color profiles as a measure of the UV slope. The sSFR radial gradients derived from these profiles allow us to quantify the inside-out scenario for the growth of spiral disks for the first time in the local Universe. We find a large dispersion in the slope of the sSFR profiles with a slightly positive mean value, which implies a moderate inside-out disk formation. There is also a strong dependency of the value of this slope on the luminosity and size of the disks, with large systems showing a uniform, slightly positive slope in almost all cases and low-luminosity small disks showing a large dispersion with both positive and negative large values. While a majority of the galaxies can be interpreted as forming stars gradually either from inside out or from outside in, a few disks require episodes of enhanced recent growth with scale lengths of the SFR (or gas infall) being significantly larger at present than in the past. We do not find any clear dependence of the sSFR gradient on the environment (local galaxy density or presence of close neighbors).